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  • Celox???

    Bought a few packs of this yesterday to keep in my IFAK's and the family kit. It's supposed to work on people using blood thinners to. Hope I don't have to find out but it makes for a better piece of mind. Has anyone here used this or have any experience with this product? Would love to hear any reviews or testimonials anyone has. Especially before I purchase more. Thanks,

    Dale

  • #2
    Celox is a good product. It does contain shrimp shells. So if someone is allergic to shrimp even though it is being used for wound care, I don't know if it could effect some ones allergies from shrimp if they are allergic. It has about a three year shelf life but has been known to last longer than that. I would try to put a few months between purchases on this item. My husband is on Plavix and I have a small amount here for him.

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    • #3
      Did you purchase the powder, solution, or impregnated gauze, Dale? I've never used or even had any. But, like you, I'm going to get some for the IFAK. I'm stunned as to how much it costs, and am equally stunned that it only stores for three years as AJ says!

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      • #4
        jez,

        I bought the powder form for ease of use for me. Like AJ's husband, I'm now on blood thinners (Effient) and need something for even minor injuries. The 3 year shelf life bums me out but like a lot of things, I figure it's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. Actually got mine in a small IFAK kit for sportsmen at Wally World for around $10.00.

        Dale

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dalewick View Post
          jez,

          I bought the powder form for ease of use for me. Like AJ's husband, I'm now on blood thinners (Effient) and need something for even minor injuries. The 3 year shelf life bums me out but like a lot of things, I figure it's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. Actually got mine in a small IFAK kit for sportsmen at Wally World for around $10.00

          Dale
          I recently bought a new, unissued, military IFAK, and would you believe IT DID NOT COME WITH CELOX! I'm ashamed to say what I paid for it. (Has about everything else, though.) I'll be adding some Celox.

          You made a good score.

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          • #6
            What about using Quikclot?

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            • #7
              Same stuff, Amy.

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              • #8
                Atleast Quikclot doesn't have an expiration date....

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by NRAamy View Post
                  Atleast Quikclot doesn't have an expiration date....
                  Celox and Quikclot actually aren't the same thing. Quikclot has a thermic reaction which if used improperly can be severe enough to cause burns in the wound area. Celox has no thermic reaction. I have been told that the military is moving away from using Quikclot and moving towards Celox and similar products.

                  Dale

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dalewick View Post
                    Celox and Quikclot actually aren't the same thing. Quikclot has a thermic reaction which if used improperly can be severe enough to cause burns in the wound area. Celox has no thermic reaction. I have been told that the military is moving away from using Quikclot and moving towards Celox and similar products.

                    Dale
                    Well, I learned something. I thought they were the same substance just different retail names. Thanks, Dale.

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                    • #11
                      Dale,

                      I believe that the thermic reaction you are talking about doesn't occur anymore. They changed the formula in 2008. I am NOT an expert on this topic, but was trying to read up on it, and found an article that claims this anyway.

                      ( http://www.z-medica.com/healthcare/H...orks/FAQs.aspx )
                      "Oh, America. I wish I could tell you that this was still America, but I've come to realize that you can't have a country without people. And there are no people here. No, my friends. This is now the United States of Zombieland"

                      "The constitution does not guarantee our safety, only our liberty!" Robert Steed before congress 3/2013

                      Skills Beats Stuff

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by myakka View Post
                        Dale,

                        I believe that the thermic reaction you are talking about doesn't occur anymore. They changed the formula in 2008. I am NOT an expert on this topic, but was trying to read up on it, and found an article that claims this anyway.

                        ( http://www.z-medica.com/healthcare/H...orks/FAQs.aspx )
                        Myakka,

                        Your right, the new "third generation" Quikclot doesn't have the burn issues. It's made of Kaolin clay. I should have done my research better. Thanks.

                        Speaking of research. I just recently watched the movie "Lone Survivor" and was surprised when it showed the seals shoving dirt into there wounds. Definitely not something I was trained to do. Does anyone know if this is an actual practice or is this strictly Hollywood?

                        Dale

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                        • #13
                          I will let the experts decide if it is military, but is certainly a southern redneck tradition.

                          When a kid gets a skinned knee down his mom doesn't say any "poor baby" or "I'll kiss it make it better" stuff. Nope, her first words are "rub some dirt in it.".... and "don't bleed on the shag rug." Or maybe that was just my house.
                          "Oh, America. I wish I could tell you that this was still America, but I've come to realize that you can't have a country without people. And there are no people here. No, my friends. This is now the United States of Zombieland"

                          "The constitution does not guarantee our safety, only our liberty!" Robert Steed before congress 3/2013

                          Skills Beats Stuff

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by myakka View Post
                            I will let the experts decide if it is military, but is certainly a southern redneck tradition.

                            When a kid gets a skinned knee down his mom doesn't say any "poor baby" or "I'll kiss it make it better" stuff. Nope, her first words are "rub some dirt in it.".... and "don't bleed on the shag rug." Or maybe that was just my house.
                            Good grief! I never heard that before. But thinking about it, it makes sense to pack the wound and staunch the blood loss in order to stay conscious and in the fight in the short-term. If you survive the fight medical care would battle any infection later. Still.....

                            I haven't seen the movie but I did read Marcus's book right after it came out. I don't remember anything about the dirt.

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                            • #15
                              Don't know about the 'rub dirt in' thing--didn't hear that here in Michigan, but wondered if the versions of celox you all are talking about include this 'syringe'-type applicator:

                              http://www.chinookmed.com/cgi-bin/item/05169/search/-CELOX-A-(Applicator,-6-gr--------------------

                              Click image for larger version

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                              I've seen it discussed/mentioned online as a way to treat gunshot wounds (and other deep, penetrating wounds). It delivers the clotting agent deep inside the wound, so it can act at the source of the bleeding.

                              From the bit of background mentioned for why celox is now being kept on hand, I'm guessing this applicator isn't part of what you all are dealing with, but given the kinds of issues discussed here more generally, if this version isn't part of your-all's awareness, thought it might be a good item to bring into this thread.

                              Here are a few articles I came across on these applicators. The first one seems to be for medical-pros but maybe it's plain english enough to be of use:

                              http://medicalhemostat.blogspot.com/2010_09_12_archive.html

                              http://www.escapistmagazine.com/news/view/131966-This-Sponge-Syringe-Can-Seal-a-Gunshot-Wound-in-15-Seconds

                              Also, here's a discussion thread with a lot to say--and a lot of back and forth--on the advisability of closing a wound or leaving it open, when/if there's a risk of infection. Seems like that's something to consider when using celox or similar product, but I'm asking that more than saying it as a fact as I don't have any experience with big wounds OR with celox. Of course, if there's serious bleeding, stopping it is the priority.

                              But does anyone know if using a clotting agent like quickclot or celox makes subsequent treatment more difficult? Long ago (3-5 yrs, I'm guessing) I asked an EMT buddy about these kinds of products and his advise was generally to NOT use them as once the injured person was as the hospital, getting that clotting-agent stuff out of the wound was difficult and could cause as much trouble as the original wound.

                              Again, though, to stop someone from bleeding out would obviously justify using the stuff.
                              Been there, done that. Then been there again several times, because apparently I never learn.

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