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    Nik
    Valued Member

  • Nik
    replied
    Originally posted by dalewick View Post

    Nik, Thanks for the heads up on licorice. The wife worked for years on getting her asthma under control without medicine or herbals and she's made it. Good to know to be careful with licorice if she ever had to fall back on it. You have to be careful with herbals the same as you do with pharmacy medicines.

    Dale
    Saw this and thought of you...
    http://www.cmaj.ca/content/191/21/E581

    Hypertensive emergency induced by licorice tea
    Jean-Pierre Falet, Arielle Elkrief and Laurence Green
    CMAJ May 27, 2019 191 (21) E581-E583; DOI: https://doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.180550


    Fair Use Quote:
    KEY POINTS
    Licorice-induced pseudohyperaldosteronism is an unusual but important cause of hypertensive emergency.

    Common findings of licorice-induced pseudohyperaldosteronism include signs of sodium retention, such as hypertension, hypokalemia or metabolic alkalosis, with low serum aldosterone levels.

    Given Canada’s multicultural population, physicians should consider screening for licorice root intake in patients with difficult-to-control hypertension.

    An 84-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a hypertensive emergency. He reported a 1-week history of persistently elevated measurements, taken at home, of systolic blood pressure (between 180 and 210 mm Hg), along with symptoms of headache, photophobia, chest pain and fatigue. On presentation to the emergency department, his blood pressure was 196/66 mm Hg. He had signs of volume overload on physical examination, including pulmonary crackles on auscultation and pitting edema of the lower extremities up to the knees. Chest radiography was consistent with mild pulmonary edema.

    The patient’s initial laboratory results in the emergency department showed a low potassium level of 2.5 (reference range 3.5–5.0) mmol/L, an elevated bicarbonate level of 31 (reference range 23–29) mmol/L and an increased troponin level of 0.14 (upper limit of normal 0.04) μg/L, with no signs of myocardial ischemia on the electrocardiogram.

    The patient had long-standing hypertension. A blood pressure measurement taken 4 months earlier showed adequate control (125/60 mm Hg). He also had a history of coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia. His medications included irbesartan, hydrochlorothiazide, acetylsalicylic acid, metformin, empagliflozin, insulin, ezetimibe and atorvastatin. He took furosemide on alternating days for mild venous insufficiency causing pitting edema of the feet.

    On admission, the patient was started on a combination of amlodipine, metoprolol and hydralazine. Irbesartan was initially held to avoid altering tests of endocrine biochemistry and later resumed. Hydrochlorothiazide was held until the end of his hospital stay to avoid aggravating the hypokalemia. The patient’s presenting symptoms resolved over the next 24 hours, except for orthopnea and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, which improved after several days of diuresis with intravenous furosemide.

    On further questioning, the patient volunteered that he had been ingesting 1 to 2 glasses of homemade licorice root extract called “erk sous” daily for the 2 weeks leading up to his presentation. Although he knew of the potential association between licorice consumption and high blood pressure, he did not think of it when he noticed his blood pressure starting to rise.
    ...

    /

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  • varuna
    Valued Member

  • varuna
    replied
    Originally posted by myakka View Post
    I have mentioned my thoughts that herbal/ natural medicine is (to me) the most overlooked skill for prepping.
    Doctors can diagnose, but then how will they treat?

    So I have been touting herbalism heavily. Now that I am studying it, I learned something disappointing. It seems that the majority of herbalists are "apothecary herbalist", that is, they purchase dried herbs and prepared oils, and use these to make their home remedies. But there are very few people left who can identify a plant, pick the correct part, prepare it, and then when the need for it arises, make the tea or tincture that they need.

    This is still commonly done in other countries. I am going to go as far as I can here, but I may have to travel to ever get the level of ability I would like to possess. My instructor goes to other countries for this reason, so I may have to see if I can tag along at some point.
    The main reason for that is CULTURE. Harbalism has always exist throughout the world as a matter of tradition rather than science.

    However even in a place where herbalism (as in planting the relevant plants yourself, and know which plant has what benefits) is a continuous tradition & practice for over 1000 years maintaining sufficient diversity of medicinal plants is a work of a small community, and not something you could do it yourself.

    Leave a comment:

  • Nik
    Valued Member

  • Nik
    replied
    Been researching some 'organic synthesis / extraction' stuff for background for tales-in-progress. Bumped some old memories, remembered tricks of the trade etc...

    Amazon etc will happily sell you complete mini-kits for distillation of essential oils. The 'tube and bung' variety, familiar from school labs, is just about within a home-workshop's tech range to modify / repair. If Soda glass, is scary-fragile, must be cosseted...


    Borosilicate with ground-glass tapered joints is 'semi-pro'. Working / re-working such will be hard. Matching that taper is non-trivial.

    So, spend a few $ at lab suppliers to get Teflon sleeves in matching taper / size. Prevents joints seizing, re-usable, hygienic...

    High-end small-batch or semi-pilot plant often use 'spherical' joints with neat clips. It's a joy to work with, but private purchase may draw unwanted attention as such often equips 'serious' meth-labs etc.
    ==

    For my next-but-one WIRS tale, I plan to blow up something larger than my fume-hooded synthesis at uni...
    ;-)

    Leave a comment:

  • dalewick
    Valued Member

  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by Nik View Post
    Dale, I've only used lab equipment in labs.

    At Uni, I used short distillation columns and careful temperature monitoring to 'fractionate' the complex mix from arcane organic syntheses.

    At work, the nearest I came to 'production' of alcohol was when a batch of methanol (certified analytical grade !!) was shipped to us in 25-litre drums lined with the *wrong* varnish. This went into solution. Its high UV absorption totally screwed many of our tests, left intransigent gunk in a lot of our instruments. I 'modded' our big rotary evaporator with a feed pipe, must have vacuum-distilled 20~30 gallons of solvent that first week, litre by litre, even more the second. I barely kept ahead of consumption until a new consignment arrived, now in glass demijohns at thrice the price...

    Eventually, metal drums went out of fashion, and were replaced by *lovely* plastic drums, which were eagerly recycled by staff...

    Finally, when the labs were refurbished, our supply went 'industrial', and our methanol came 'on tap'...

    My cautions over distillation temperatures and pressures are because of the many, many horror stories of blindness and death from incautious Moonshine, Potcheen and 'Garage Vodka' production. There is a narrow margin between discarding too much of the 'first cut' with its methanol aka 'wood alcohol' and poisoning the drinkers...

    IIRC, engines don't mind a bit of methanol in their mix, but livers and retinas are intolerant...

    May I also caution you over licorice ? Long ago, We incorporated some as flavouring and for cough mitigation, but it is a potentially potent drug in its own right. IIRC, there are significant interactions with kidney and liver function, and their medications.
    Due care, please ??
    Nik, Thanks for the heads up on licorice. The wife worked for years on getting her asthma under control without medicine or herbals and she's made it. Good to know to be careful with licorice if she ever had to fall back on it. You have to be careful with herbals the same as you do with pharmacy medicines.

    Dale

    Leave a comment:

  • Nik
    Valued Member

  • Nik
    replied
    Dale, I've only used lab equipment in labs.

    At Uni, I used short distillation columns and careful temperature monitoring to 'fractionate' the complex mix from arcane organic syntheses.

    At work, the nearest I came to 'production' of alcohol was when a batch of methanol (certified analytical grade !!) was shipped to us in 25-litre drums lined with the *wrong* varnish. This went into solution. Its high UV absorption totally screwed many of our tests, left intransigent gunk in a lot of our instruments. I 'modded' our big rotary evaporator with a feed pipe, must have vacuum-distilled 20~30 gallons of solvent that first week, litre by litre, even more the second. I barely kept ahead of consumption until a new consignment arrived, now in glass demijohns at thrice the price...

    Eventually, metal drums went out of fashion, and were replaced by *lovely* plastic drums, which were eagerly recycled by staff...

    Finally, when the labs were refurbished, our supply went 'industrial', and our methanol came 'on tap'...

    My cautions over distillation temperatures and pressures are because of the many, many horror stories of blindness and death from incautious Moonshine, Potcheen and 'Garage Vodka' production. There is a narrow margin between discarding too much of the 'first cut' with its methanol aka 'wood alcohol' and poisoning the drinkers...

    IIRC, engines don't mind a bit of methanol in their mix, but livers and retinas are intolerant...

    May I also caution you over licorice ? Long ago, we incorporated some as flavouring and for cough mitigation, but it is a potentially potent drug in its own right. IIRC, there are significant interactions with kidney and liver function, and their medications.
    Due care, please ??

    Leave a comment:

  • dalewick
    Valued Member

  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by Morgan101 View Post
    Does anyone know any herbal remedies for asthma? I have not been able to find anything.
    Hadn't seen your post before Morgan. My wife has asthma and my oldest daughter had childhood asthma so years ago I researched this, just in case. The most used herbal that I could find out about is Licorice root. My wife tried it in a tea and said it actually worked for her. The only other treatment I remember was turmeric, but I don't remember how it had to be used. Hope this helps.

    Dale

    Leave a comment:

  • dalewick
    Valued Member

  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by GrizzlyetteAdams View Post
    I am so low-tech that I would probably McGyver it with a heavy farm jack...something that will outlast me, hopefully!
    GrizzlyetteAdams, After looking at that picture closely I'm thinking your right. Weld up the frame and a $20 hydraulic jack has most of the working parts taken care of. I'm thinking a section of 6 inch schedule 80 PVC (can be sterilized) only leaves the plunger and sieve/strainer material. I guess that can be purchased fairly cheap from Grainger Tools, Fisher Scientific or OnlineMetals.com Might be something good to have on hand.

    Dale

    Leave a comment:

  • dalewick
    Valued Member

  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by Nik View Post

    An important point: A LOT of these extractions and tests rely on high quality ethanol or ether. The tech to make these solvents is non-trivial, and the results are potentially very valuable. The specialised thermometers and hydrometers to run a good still will be priceless. Discarding that 'first cut' with its toxic methanol is what turns moonshine into the good stuff. Didn't a bad batch of hooch recently clobber hundreds in Iran ??
    The small temperature difference between toxic and safe will vary depending on atmospheric pressure, so change with weather and altitude. You'll need a barometer and conversion tables, too...
    .
    Nik,

    I've never produced moonshine with anything glass or with the equipment (hydrometers, conversion tables, etc. ) you have mentioned. I learned from family members and they were very good at what they did. My grandfather could easily run 2, 4 or 8 cylinder engines on what he made and cut down on pinging by adding motor oil to his mix. I've seen his test out at 180 proof to 200 proof pure but that was many years ago. I remember what I was taught but would love to learn how to run a still in a scientific method. Can you recommend any good books on the subject. I would appreciate it.

    Dale

    Leave a comment:

  • GrizzlyetteAdams
    Banned

  • GrizzlyetteAdams
    replied
    I am so low-tech that I would probably McGyver it with a heavy farm jack...something that will outlast me, hopefully!

    Leave a comment:

  • Nik
    Valued Member

  • Nik
    replied
    Just looked on that link...
    Ooh, that's a BIG Booger, looks hydraulic. Garage gear...
    Speaking of which, a diamond-shaped manual car jack or small hydraulic jack could probably do the trick. Think wine-press, but smaller...
    ( I'm sure I saw that in a 'WholeEarth' directory, way-back when... )

    The trick beyond the hefty frame would be the sieve and piston. Um, do some cars have sleeved cylinders ??

    Leave a comment:

  • GrizzlyetteAdams
    Banned

  • GrizzlyetteAdams
    replied
    Nik, that would be 100% my dream job!

    You are right about extracting plant essences being a valuable trading asset... In fact, your post reminded me of something that is on my wish-list, a tincture press:

    https://strictlymedicinalseeds.com/p...cture-presses/

    That is SO out of my price range, so I will have to resort to the next best thing, and "make do" with other resources.

    Leave a comment:

  • Nik
    Valued Member

  • Nik
    replied
    Hi ! It's been a while but, when I started work in the mid-1970s, a lot of our pharmaceutical ingredients were 'natural' rather than synthetic. We'd run mini-extracts on the purchase sample to determine how much active ingredient was in the crop, check for adulterants, pests etc.

    As we worked on a 'Trust but Verify' basis, we also tested representative samples of the bulk materials which subsequently arrived...

    For eg the hyoscine that went into cough mixtures, we'd steam-distil and report the few percent of essential oils. We'd also ash a quantity, check there was no added salt, clay or whatever. In the production area, they'd mash a suitable quantity with an alcohol blend, then pressure filter the juice. Thing was there could be a 50% variation of drug content between crops, often only partly due to the moisture content. which we also determined, and for which the production area also allowed. A wetter crop needed a stronger alcoholic extraction...

    Other drugs needed 'hot mashing' and/or centrifuging...

    Liquorice for flavouring came as gnarly twigs with, IIRC, drug content ranging from ~1% up to 6~7% of dry. Again, we had to determine the active content, and the production people factored this into their mix...

    We also did a lot of 'Thin Layer Chromatography' to check for 'look alike' contaminants...

    Some plants often 'took up' arsenic and heavy metals from ground water, we tested for such...

    Must be said that extracting perfume essences from flower petals could be a valuable trading asset. A few drops added to simple soap or candles will multiply their value. A small bottle of wild-rose essence may charm your son's sweet-heart's reluctant mum...

    An important point: A LOT of these extractions and tests rely on high quality ethanol or ether. The tech to make these solvents is non-trivial, and the results are potentially very valuable. The specialised thermometers and hydrometers to run a good still will be priceless. Discarding that 'first cut' with its toxic methanol is what turns moonshine into the good stuff. Didn't a bad batch of hooch recently clobber hundreds in Iran ??
    The small temperature difference between toxic and safe will vary depending on atmospheric pressure, so change with weather and altitude. You'll need a barometer and conversion tables, too...

    And, yes, ether allows for surgical intervention with less risk of pain-induced shock...

    The glass-working skills to contrive these mini-stills will be valuable, too...

    Leave a comment:

  • GrizzlyetteAdams
    Banned

  • GrizzlyetteAdams
    replied
    This might help:

    https://www.motherearthliving.com/he...tay-healthy-38

    https://www.drweil.com/health-wellne...asthma/asthma/

    https://restorativemedicine.org/jour...atory-illness/

    To purchase herbs:

    https://www.mountainroseherbs.com

    https://www.frontiercoop.com/

    https://www.vitacost.com/

    Leave a comment:

  • Morgan101
    Valued Member

  • Morgan101
    replied
    Does anyone know any herbal remedies for asthma? I have not been able to find anything.

    Leave a comment:

  • CountryGuy
    Valued Member

  • CountryGuy
    replied
    Here are a few items to take a look at. I'm going to pick up the books and I want to check in to the course as something to do this winter.

    I've heard this referred to as the one book to have if you can only have one on herbal medicine

    https://www.amazon.com/Herbal-Medici...18fa2e288d36eb

    and this lady, Cat Ellis is to have some great books and an online herbal course. Cat is a prepper and comes at life with that mentality and the course is to be designed to take a complete novice and fairly quickly give them a substantial level of skill and understanding. Her website is:

    https://www.herbalprepper.com/

    2 of her books:

    https://www.amazon.com/Prepping-Pand...26665d4adcc8cf

    https://www.amazon.com/Preppers-Natu...sap_bc?ie=UTF8

    I also have a book I have in my collection, though I've not read thru it all but seems to have a lot of great and fairly simple info. It's by Bradford Angier so like his other books a load of common sense wisdom

    https://www.amazon.com/Field-Guide-M...al+wild+plants
    The Herbal Medicine-Maker's Handbook: A Home Manual [James Green, Ajana] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. THE HERBAL MEDICINE-MAKER'¬?S HANDBOOK is an entertaining compilation of natural home remedies written by one of the great herbalists

    Leave a comment:

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