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  • How many know what plants are edible?

    How many know what plants are edible and which are poisonous where they plan to BO?

    Personally, I doubt many do know because their BO plan is hunt and fish.

    Thoughts and opinions?





  • #2
    I know many for this location. More important is we have some that are FATAL if consumed. Not talking sicker than super sick, but fatal.

    One problem is I can have up to 12 feet of snow.

    I have more food buried then I will likely live long enough to consume
    One day you eat the chicken.....next day the left-over chicken.....next five days you eat chicken feathers, head and feet.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Sourdough View Post
      I know many for this location. More important is we have some that are FATAL if consumed. Not talking sicker than super sick, but fatal.

      One problem is I can have up to 12 feet of snow.

      I have more food buried then I will likely live long enough to consume
      Knowing where they are for your location is a life saver. OTOH, Digging up a cache buried in frozen ground covered up by 12' of snow would be very problematic.

      We have a lot of food here, game and fish; however, supplementing it with vegetables and necessary vitamins is my concern.
      Here's one example:
      https://www.healthline.com/health/scurvy and there are more.

      I've bought a few edible plants books and to be honest, they stink for here.

      This thread requires a lot more thought than a BOB.

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      • #4
        I always try to add to my knowledge , I was watching utube 3am can't sleep. And watching an ozzie ocean fishing channel, and he's consuming cactus fruit. Well added my local cactus plant as edible, the palm is woody fruit isn't fully ripe tart. I can generally source wild onions, cattail roots, the hot dogs they have is horrible. Lots of Marmot in the hood, lol. Have to wait for fall fir the morels and pine mushrooms from the fires last year. There was all sorts of mushrooms in the spring.

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        • #5
          I bury food so that the ground never freezes. The undisturbed ground in the forest here never freezes because there is 10" to 12" of thick woven moss on the forest floor, which acts as insulation

          Last fall I buried 15 cases of 24 cans each (360 cans) of Sockeye Salmon, also called Red Salmon. A great source of healthy omega oils.

          For vitamin "C" I harvest wild "Rose Hips". They are bitter but get the mission accomplished.
          One day you eat the chicken.....next day the left-over chicken.....next five days you eat chicken feathers, head and feet.

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          • #6
            Armyjimbo,
            Aloe is great for burns, we have a few Aloe plants in the sun room.
            Here the swampy area has a lot of cattails; however due to cotton mouth moccasins; harvesting the roots would be a winter harvest. LOL It's a couple of miles from here, currently, we ride bikes there.
            Out of curiosity, I built a V shaped fish and it does catch fish. Someone destroyed it; I'd bet it was a game warden.

            I have a pellet rifle and thousands of pellets; so harvesting chipmunks, squirrels and raccoons etc. Raccoons may carry raccoon roundworms; so the meat must be cooked thoroughly by boiling or BBQ.
            There are numerous turtles here who sun on the rocks. I'm not much for eating turtles or feral hogs.



            Sourdough,
            That's a slick idea! I saw Glenn on "Life Below Zero" build a freezer by digging a hole, putting ice and food inside and covering it with moss. An excavator told me if there was grass or weeds covering the ground; he could dig a foundation. As Maryland's winters are a lot warmer than yours; less "insulation" works!
            Rose hips from the Rugosa variety of roses are considered one of the best sources and they spread. A lot of people plant them for a decorative hedge.


            As we have a lot of game and fish, we stockpile commercial or home canned vegetables. As bedrock is too close to the surface to have a 500 gallon tank of propane; we have two 250 gallons. That will can vegetables longer than we'll be around.
            BTW, due to expansion, a 250 gallon propane tank is filled at 200 gallons.


            At the local Farmer's Market, one of the vendors has a very modest hydroponic garden in a spare bedroom. I've been considering the idea.
            Our sun room is 12' long and 14' wide with a lot of windows. Each sidewall has 3 3'x6' windows and the rear wall has 2 6'x6' casement windows. Water is easily circulated with a solar powered small pump.

            Thoughts and opinions?

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            • #7
              I've grown my own "spices" here, but it was tented. A smaller setup would / could provide lots of food using the vertical grow ladder method.

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FimmmsRxtiQ

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              • #8
                I am in a huge life transition at nearly 76 y/o. I just closed on the sale of one-half of this perfect survival homestead. That was the half with the garden. It was also the half with the crude logging trail up the mountain.
                Last edited by Sourdough; 08-01-2022, 08:32 PM.
                One day you eat the chicken.....next day the left-over chicken.....next five days you eat chicken feathers, head and feet.

                Comment


                • #9
                  https://www.ebay.com/itm/393651672054
                  Somehow, I doubt the above would support 80 tomato plants.
                  As it faces the South, our sun room would not need grow lights. Having enough hydroponic nutrients for long term growing would be the problem. One that I don't see a method for over coming the need for nutrients..

                  There's an ex-pat who lives in Cambodia who has a huge hydroponic setup. He posted pictures; basically he purchased plate glass, built frames for the top and bottom. The corners were sealed a with a certain kind of silicone used to build fish tanks. To supply nutrients, he used fish.
                  I don't know how he fed the fish. However, over there insects are plentiful.

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