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Depression Era Recipes - Save $$$$$$

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  • Depression Era Recipes - Save $$$$$$

    http://prepperswill.com/great-depres...urvive-famine/


    check out the onion and peanut butter combo - it was a Depression fav ... ?????????

  • #2
    Never say never. I can't imagine eating onions stuffed with peanut butter. Vinegar Cobbler doesn't sound to pleasing either. If you are starving I guess it doesn't matter. The Great Depression probably affected at least three generations after it. We have been very blessed to have such plenty for such a long time. The Recession in 2008 was no where close.
    The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

    Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Morgan101 View Post
      Never say never. I can't imagine eating onions stuffed with peanut butter. Vinegar Cobbler doesn't sound to pleasing either. If you are starving I guess it doesn't matter. The Great Depression probably affected at least three generations after it. We have been very blessed to have such plenty for such a long time. The Recession in 2008 was no where close.


      the Depression Era and the following WW2 era foodsaver recipes are nothing new to me - but that PB & onion was a new one and was supposedly a big fav of the time - ?????

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      • #4
        Never heard of the PB and onion recipe. Heard of a number of the others and grew up eating some of them. I just thought that was part of growing up Appalachian. I remember looking forward to spring because I loved fresh mustard greens right out of the garden and fields and other family members would be picking Polk greens along with dandelions, watercress, wild violets and fiddleheads. Hunger has a funny way of altering the appetite and things people turn there noses up at now, may be considered fine dinning after a SHTF event. My Mom told stories about how her and her sisters would fight to see who got to eat the chickens egg sack fried up with scrambled eggs and how Grandpa preferred squirrel brains scrambled with his eggs for breakfast to any other.
        Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

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        • #5
          I remember my mom talking about that time. She said that the CCC would come around once a month and give out can goods always one type of food. So one month it was green beans another month it was corn or flour. So they learned to trade with other towns for items they had a lot of for the items they needed. She was born and raised on a dairy farm, just like me.

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          • #6
            So glad my grandparents had a farm. I never really went through having to rely on any of that. We always had veggies from the garden, eggs and my grandfather and uncles hunted. My grandmother canned veggies and jellies and they smoked most of the meat. I know it was hard on many, many folks back then. In today's world, it will be the biggest wake up call we will ever see. So many people have no idea what is happening in this country. Let alone in other countries. Time to get their heads out of the sand because I really believe things are going to start happening fast. And with Toys are us going out, they said 33,000 people will loose their jobs. Just another reason to stock a food pantry. Also things are about to happen with Farm Fresh. Kroger, Harris Teeter and Food Lion are in process of buying all of the Farm Freshes up with maybe 20 closings. What is happening to all these stores that I see closing like this is not a good sign for the economy. What's next?
            And also my grandparents sold food to the local markets and traded for things they needed as well. Never thought of it as a bartering system back then but when I watched my grandmother trade stuff and went to the markets with my grandfather to sell veggies from the farm. I guess in a way I was learning bartering. Though I really think it will be different today..

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            • #7
              I followed an awesome lady who unfortunately passed away a few years ago. CRAZY recipes:

              https://www.youtube.com/user/DepressionCooking

              -Buggy
              I'm not a fatalist. I'm a realist.

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