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Saltine Crackers

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  • CountryGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by Morgan101 View Post
    CG: I have watched several of his You Tube videos. They are excellent. Very interesting. The methods he demonstrates are a lost art.
    Indeed, if you get a chance check out the ones done at Mt Vernon. The history lesson on the way things were done and just on life in general were awesome. He also has one on roasting you're own green coffee beans over a camp fire with a rein-actor friend of his who also happens to own a coffee shop where they roast their own beans.

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  • Morgan101
    replied
    CG: I have watched several of his You Tube videos. They are excellent. Very interesting. The methods he demonstrates are a lost art.

    Leave a comment:


  • CountryGuy
    replied
    Have you all ever checked this guy out? he does reenactment types of stuff and has business selling equipment similar to around the revolution. But the biggest thing his videos center on is the food, recipes and issues they often faced with food. Lots of great vids and One of these weekends I'm gonna get the kids together and work on doing some of the simpler dishes over a camp fire in the back yard. I find he's a load of wealth to garner things from. I believe he's out of Iowa? Somewhere out in the mid-west. A few months back he did a series at Mt Vernon with some of the people that worked there doing different of Washington's favorite foods and common meals they'd have had. I'm a bit of a history geek so I find it interesting. I'm telling you, we don't know the first thing about hard living compared to what our forefathers did on a daily basis.

    A channel dedicated to exploring the 18th Century lifestyle. Subscribe for hundreds of videos on 18th century living, cooking, clothing, and much more. Our W...

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  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by Morgan101 View Post
    . Put honey and peanut butter on them, and they might be palatable.
    I tried peanut butter and chocolate on them and it didn't help. Still thought I was going to bust every tooth out of my head. After my first experience, I leave hardtack alone and make bannock or biscuits. LOL!

    Dale

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  • Applejack
    replied
    Don't be fooled. I have had saltine crackers to go stale. And that is after trying methods to keep them long term. Both oven canning and mylar bags with 02 obsorbers. They did keep a good year past the exp. date but that was it on both ways to preserve them. Better to make hardtack. That will keep forever. I have several recipes for making hardtack somewhere in my stash of books and papers.. Will have to get them out again

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  • Illini Warrior
    replied
    saltines and hardtack are just distant cousins with no real relationship ....

    if you want hardtack just pick up some matza from the ethnic section of the bigger stores or wait for the after season sales - they sell it for ceremony and that's about all ...

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  • Buggyout
    replied
    Morg! You should make some. It's really easy. I wanted to vacuum seal a bunch when I made them, thinking that it would be a great way to preserve flour in general. I can't imagine them not lasting forever if they were sealed.

    I think I'll make another batch! hhaha!

    -Buggy

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  • Morgan101
    replied
    Buggy: I almost fell off the chair laughing. The general consensus during the Civil War was soldiers were pretty sure that hardtack would stop a bullet. It gives new meaning to the term 'stale'. I know they won't win any culinary awards, but will they last for very long periods of time. Put honey and peanut butter on them, and they might be palatable.

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  • Buggyout
    replied
    BAHHAHAHA! :

    "Eating one will make it difficult to imagine how any human being could consume that many hardtacks each day. The dryness sucks out any moisture from your mouth. The heavy wafer in your hand feels just as heavy in the stomach. They are so dense, soldiers used to use them as small plates. And, of course, the flavor is incredibly uninteresting – you’re basically just eating flour. And that, of course, is the point of making them. Where other food blogs often just post old recipes, I’ve always insisted on making whatever I post – firmly believing that much about what you can learn about the history of the food comes from the actual making and eating of it."

    Funny stuff.

    -Buggy

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  • Buggyout
    replied
    Can't find the recipe I used, but this link is awesome:

    History and recipe of Hardtack, a dense Civil War-era cracker that was rationed to Union and Confederate troops.

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  • Buggyout
    replied
    I made hardtack a few years ago after finding an authentic 1800 era recipe. They are MOST definitely not saltine crackers! LOL!

    To say that you had to soak them before eating them is an understatement. Seriously, you could spend an hour gnawing on them. I'll try to dig up the recipe I used for you.

    Saltines do get stale. Hardtack, in my experience, are born stale! Hahhha!

    -Buggy

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  • Morgan101
    started a topic Saltine Crackers

    Saltine Crackers

    A few questions for everybody. Aren't Saltine Crackers the modern day equivalent of Hardtack? Same as what they ate in the Civil War? Do you include them in your food preps?

    I have included them in mine, and time will tell if they are a forever food. Do they really have an expiration date? What ingredient in them will go bad? Your thoughts.
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