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Why Would You Hunt?

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  • randyt
    replied
    I don't really hunt, I carry a firearm while checking the trapline

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  • Liam7856
    replied
    Hunting in the era of consumerism is entertainment or game, as you like. The main thing to this is true, for example, sometimes hunters are needed.

    There was a village near my town and foxes began to breed in the forest. Then he had rabies.

    As a result, after the official order to shoot the foxes, they were forced to hire hunters and eliminate this problem, otherwise, not only people but the whole forest could have suffered.

    If you have permission to shoot certain animals, you can do this, you take your meat and restore balance in nature.

    For me, it's adrenaline and a way to challenge yourself :)

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  • Sierra 173
    replied
    To gather food. To gather intelligence about what's going on around me. To see if I am in any potential danger from approaching threats. Any number of reasons.

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  • grumpygremlin
    replied
    post TEOTWAWKI I intend to mainly trap and snare, hunting take up too much time and I will have plenty of other things to be getting on with.

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  • ZAGran
    replied
    Originally posted by Buggyout View Post
    Why would I hunt?

    To eat.

    -Buggy
    And because of the cycles of feast or famine we can't count on hunting as our main protein source all the time. Learn to make jerky & cure meat (the smoked kind that keeps longer) and use trapping to back it up or visa versa.

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  • RICHFL
    replied
    White tail deer are targeted for hunting by raising plots of grass, sugar beets and slat licks to get them to come to eat at a certain location.

    After SHTF I expect that this practice will continue.

    We have 3 small game plots on our farm that are used to keep the animals out of our gardens and crops. It works.

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  • Buggyout
    replied
    Why would I hunt?

    To eat.

    -Buggy

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  • whisper
    replied
    I am going to ask my friend who Bow hunts deer to take me along. I have never hunted and I need to know how to kill a deer properly and how to dress it in the field. I know I'm late in the game, but with all that's going on in this world, better late than never.

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  • m38
    replied
    Just because you can't hunt over bait, does not mean you can't use the bait to see what it will bring in. Experiment. Especially if you can put up a game camera to watch over the bait. That will tell you what is coming in on it, and what you have in the area. If you can't get a game camera, then use smooth sand, or smooth dirt to capture footprints of the animals coming by. A trick I learned in Scouts was to sprinkle flour around a feed-site to see the tracks. Only problem with that is some animals will lick up the flour. I still haven't learned how to track a tongue!

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  • mtnlioness
    replied
    Forgot to get back to this thread. Air headitis sometimes. It is NOT legal to bait animals in this area but when TSHTF I'm not worried about what the law has to say as I believe they will be to busy with their own problems to notice. Now to gather up some of the things we will need and find out what will not go bad while storing it for future use. Thanks.......also ordered the catalogue from the other link. Can't wait to see it.

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  • mtnlioness
    replied
    Thanks Dale......will be doing a bunch of the above. More questions to drive you crazy as they come up. Once again, thanks a million.

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  • ctdcb18b
    replied
    increased chances of food intake depending on how big your group is ie if it where just 2 people i know you can probably sustain with trapping and foraging buy for larger groups you might have to throw hunting and farming into the mix as there is a larger food demand imo

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  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by mtnlioness View Post
    Dale, you are a huge help. I need to find a trapper around here to help me learn first hand. Being new to this area I guess several trips to th local shooting range might net someone of that calibur. If not, maybe have to resort to the yellow pages or google. I know there are guides and others available in Maine but it is a long trip now for me. Not sure the hubby is up to doing some of this stuff but I will do anything to keep fresh meat around to supplement what we already have. I'm kinda bummed in some ways, no boar up here yet. I know they cause all kinds of trouble but at least they are a ready source of meat if cooked properly. Bigger game is my thing. Do have a way to store a sizeable amount of meat and of course if it is winter just do what the great grandparents and grandparents did hang it in the safest place possible and cut of junks as needed. Have been thinking about building a small smoke house but might be biting off more then I can chew. Have a tendency to do that kind of thing. Haven't mentioned it to my better half yet. He already thinks I'm a nut at times. Rough carpentry is another thing I'm pretty good at so it just might work. Thankfully he is fully on with prepping in so many other ways. I'm just an old fashion country girl who is a jack of all trades and master of not much. Thanks again for all your wonderful help.
    mtnlioness,
    If your interested in finding a trapper or 2 in your area to learn from I might be able to get you headed in the right direction. 1 - Contact your district wildlife biologist and explain to him your interest in learning to trap, they are often very helpful. 2 - Contact your states trappers association and as a lady they may know of someone in your area who would be willing to show you the ropes. Most state associations are always trying to draw women to the sport. 3 - Contact your states USDA - Wildlife Services office as they do this kind of work and your tax dollars pay there saleries. You may even be able to volunteer for the agency as a learning experience.

    Hope these help.

    Dale

    Leave a comment:


  • mtnlioness
    replied
    Dale, you are a huge help. I need to find a trapper around here to help me learn first hand. Being new to this area I guess several trips to th local shooting range might net someone of that calibur. If not, maybe have to resort to the yellow pages or google. I know there are guides and others available in Maine but it is a long trip now for me. Not sure the hubby is up to doing some of this stuff but I will do anything to keep fresh meat around to supplement what we already have. I'm kinda bummed in some ways, no boar up here yet. I know they cause all kinds of trouble but at least they are a ready source of meat if cooked properly. Bigger game is my thing. Do have a way to store a sizeable amount of meat and of course if it is winter just do what the great grandparents and grandparents did hang it in the safest place possible and cut of junks as needed. Have been thinking about building a small smoke house but might be biting off more then I can chew. Have a tendency to do that kind of thing. Haven't mentioned it to my better half yet. He already thinks I'm a nut at times. Rough carpentry is another thing I'm pretty good at so it just might work. Thankfully he is fully on with prepping in so many other ways. I'm just an old fashion country girl who is a jack of all trades and master of not much. Thanks again for all your wonderful help.

    Leave a comment:


  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by mtnlioness View Post
    Thanks Dale.....currently trying to suck up the information on that website you provided. Deer, bear and moose are my favs followed by rabbit, fish (almost any kind) and if really really hungry........anything that walks or crawls or makes a noise. I've fished like crazy most of my life and have the knowledge and equipment to tie flies to match whatever the fish are biting. There are a couple of small ponds not to far from me but I think they are mostly hornpout (catfish) and pickeral. Definately want to get the bigger game in close.....don't care how damn smelly the bait is. Hell.....grew up on a farm and had to stick my arm up a cows tail end to help deliver a calf.......takes alot to gross me out.
    mthlioness,
    Outstanding. If your really wanting to get mostly big game in close, that mineral lick works great. While you can add a feeder to the area with corn and soybeans for deer and moose. Take 55 gallon drums and board or log the fronts up and put in alfalfa cubes with molasses and anise oil on them to attract bear (if bear baiting is legal). Coons, fox and others will come after the bears have torn the front open. If you can get a beer brewerys remains, silage or other celluose type feeds and treat them the same way they will also work as will old pasteries, etc. For survival food gathering I would also recommend that you learn how to snare animals with modern steel cable snares. Cable as light as 1/8 inch will hold and dispatch animals as large as black bear, wolf, hogs and deer in a survival situation. Smaller animals use smaller cable and you should have an ample supply of beaver and muskrats in your area. Beaver is excellent eating and taste similar to beef (the tail meat above the paddle and the back legs are the best.) If your serious about collecting fish in a survival situation, buy or make yourself a gill net. Fastest way I know to catch a lot of fish. A really good skill to have as well since you can also make hoop fish traps with the same skill set.

    As far as the smell goes, I guess I got used to it even though the wife never did. But I worked animal damage control for 5 years for USDA and after opening up enough animals after being maggot blown and lying in the hot summer sun for 3 -5 days, not even a skunk smells that bad. LOL. Did hate it after doing a necropesy on something totally maggot blown going home and having rice for dinner. Never said a word to the wife though. LOL.

    Dale

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