Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New to hunting

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New to hunting

    I am looking to not only buy a rifle but any other things I might need as well such as a game hoist , bag , ect.
    but everywhere I go ( like Cabela's , sportsmans warehouse , ect. ) every salesman has a different ( and more expensive ) list of needed items .
    The rifle I have in mind is the .270 Savage Axis , mostly because the cost is low and from what I have read and heard it is a decent choice for a first game rifle but the rest of the items I might need I am pretty much in the dark , can anyone offer any advice ?
    Two in the head and you know they are dead :cool:

  • #2
    Welcome to a great new sport / protein gathering. Remember SAFETY FIRST. Good luck!
    Last edited by snake35; 04-29-2012, 08:31 PM. Reason: spelling error

    Comment


    • #3
      Admittedly, I am not the world's leading authority on hunting. I do what I do, and it works for me. But I think I can offer a small insight.

      First thought is, what do you see yourself hunting? If it is small game, rabbits, etc, then some items won't be needed, (game cart.... etc) If you want to stalk, or sit in a tree stand then that will make a difference.

      But for me, I just went stalking hog hunting, and here is what I took:
      Small backpack with 4 bottles of water, weapon (in this case crossbow) ammo (most beginners carry way too much. You will only be pulling the trigger once or twice while looking for big game like deer)
      Field glasses (binoculars, but not 10x 50's, something small just for scoping out large fields)
      Now I was near my truck, but in the bed in case I made a large kill I had a fold out game cart.
      Rules about whether you can field dress a kill and leave the remains are specifiv to your hunting area.
      I also carry a small pistol for a mercy kill on a wounded animal, and for self protection if I am run up on a monster boar who takes exception to my presence.

      I am lucky. A friend of mine is an avid hunter, and really respected by everyone I know who hunts. While I had hunted as a kid, I don't consider myself an expert by any means. So I asked him to let me tag along and to give me any pointers. He obliged, and I have learned alot. Maybe you have a friend who could do the same?

      Lastly, I use a Savage 270 when I carry a rifle hunting, and have been very happy with it.

      Good Luck!
      "Oh, America. I wish I could tell you that this was still America, but I've come to realize that you can't have a country without people. And there are no people here. No, my friends. This is now the United States of Zombieland"

      "The constitution does not guarantee our safety, only our liberty!" Robert Steed before congress 3/2013

      Skills Beats Stuff

      Comment


      • #4
        Sorry, forgot sharp knives and a compass on the list! I have a fillet knife like in a tackle box, and a fat curved knife with a hook on the back called a "gameripper".
        There might be a few odds and ends i forgot, but I am sure there are some very experienced voices on here that will cover what I missed.
        "Oh, America. I wish I could tell you that this was still America, but I've come to realize that you can't have a country without people. And there are no people here. No, my friends. This is now the United States of Zombieland"

        "The constitution does not guarantee our safety, only our liberty!" Robert Steed before congress 3/2013

        Skills Beats Stuff

        Comment


        • #5
          +1 on the idea of tagging along with an experienced hunter if possible. There are a million tips and tricks, depending on the game and area you're hunting, that can only be gained through time in the field. An experienced hunting partner can shorten the learning curve for you. As for equipment...I assume with the 270 you're going after deer sized game. With that in mind, in addition to what myakka mentioned, I carry a field dressing kit in my pack. They can be picked up at Walmart for a couple of bucks and contains gloves, bags etc. I also have a pack of wipes, like Wet Ones, for cleaning up any blood from knives and/or myself. Topo and aerial maps of the area you're hunting can also be a big help. Not just for keep track of where you're at but I like to make notes on mine. I mark the game trails and any sightings I have to include time/date and weather conditions. Hope this helps and Happy Hunting!
          Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading.

          Comment


          • #6
            Well first I would suggest you get a copy of your state hunting regulations, so you know what caliber rifle is the minimum allowed and if there are any restrictions as to where you can use them. Plus read all the rules and regulations associated with each animal you plan on hunting, If you haven't taken a hunter education course I would suggest that as your next step, I think most states require it now for new hunters getting their first hunting license. Next get U.S.G.S. topographical maps of the areas you plan on hunting and a good quality compass, and learn how to use them. Don't rely on electronics alone, that is a recipe for disaster.

            As far as rifles go, if you can rent different calibers and models at your local range you may want to go that route, or hopefully you have a few friends with different models who would take you out to try theirs. My first deer rifle was a Winchester model 94 lever action .30-.30, it was a great starter rifle and I used it for years and still have it. I now use my Remington Model 700 BDL L.A. 30-06 bolt rifle and have for many years. I also have an Armalite AR-10 .308 that I use occasionally but usually I stick with my Remington.
            It all comes down to what you are comfortable with.

            As for the rest, their are plenty of books and websites out there to help you, and hopefully you know someone willing to be a mentor, nothing beats knowledge and experience. Good luck, safety first and I hope you have a wonderful time learning and enjoying your new pastime.

            Joe
            SEMPER PARATUS

            Comment


            • #7
              Dean, I'm assuming you considering hunting big game, (Deer, Elk, Moose, antelope, bear, etc.). For the rockies personnally I used a rifle of the right caliber (270 win, 308, 30-06, 300 mag., etc.) with a good scope, a good sharp belt knife, folding saw, cheese cloth (to wrap gamemeat in), rope (20-25ft.), and a way to pack your game out (Good pack frame, ATV, Horse/preferred), Good pair of Bino's. That should easily get you started.

              Another great thing for a young hunter to do without family members to learn from is get to know some respected local hunters especially farmers or ranchers. More can be learned from your states big game biologist and game wardens/Conservation officers.

              Hope this helps.

              Comment


              • #8
                The bare necessities, A rifle and ammo, good knife, sharpener of some sort, Someway to attatch the tag to your kill ( I use electrical tape) some way to cut out the date on the tag, Some way to get your kill from the kill spot to your vehicle or camp ( rope, sled, cart, muscle) and a hunting license.
                Some "luxuries" include a survival kit, map, compass, firestarter, appropriate clothing and footwear, water, food, medicine, hand sanitizer, rubber gloves, bone saw, binoculars, bear spray, handgun, etc.

                So much depends on what you are hunting and where you are hunting at. If you could give us more details I am sure there are all kinds of good advice from all the hunters on this site.
                SQUARE PEG IN A ROUND HOLE

                Comment


                • #9
                  I don't hunt but my husband used to and is unble to hunt now. but my neighbor hunts wild boar and bear. first time i have eatin these and they where great eating. he also hunts deer and fishes. we wil be having a lot of neigbors getting together for barbaques again this summer. and he helps us fill our freezer with meat. We are blessed to have a few great neigbors here. we have a garden and another neighbor also has one and we share this also. we have already canned a lot and my neighbor the hunter wants me to teach him to make salsa and can it. He can't get enough of it.
                  Applejack

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm not exactly like a hunting guru but I can suggest a couple of things: basic knowledge on hunting (read up some materials and know your state regulations on hunting), grab some gear which would include knives, rope (anything similar you can use to tie your kill), compass, binoculars, camo or dark clothing, communication equipment (just make sure that you know how to use them/switch on and off, you don't want to scare those animals away, I use radios and I always bring two way radios along for emergency purposes, you'll never know what will happen when you're out there), lots of muscle (to help you carry what you've hunted to your vehicle), and perhaps, if you can find help from somebody(someone experienced) if it is your first time to hunt, the better.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      always check your states laws,some times they have some pretty strage laws.For example you can shoot or kill a deer in New Hamp.(where I'm from) with a .22 cal. center fire,but you can't kill a deer with a .22 cal rimfire,in other words if you hit a deer with a legal cal. weapon and it's down and you want to put it out of it's misery you can't use a .22cal. rimfire. l think that's #1 on my list of stupid. I taught hunter's safety th N.H. for about 15 years but can't figure out why you shouldn't be able to finish off a deer with a .22 rimfire

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Everyone here has given good advice. Let me add one other thing. Get to know your firearm.
                        you purchase your .270 Savage Axis, learn all the safety regs, take your hunters ed course and find an experienced hunter to take you out Somewhere in there, learn your firearm. Take it to the range. Shoot it a lot! Sitting, Standing, Prone, & Braced At least 5 to 10 shots from each position Then sight it in. Then shoot it some more. At least 3 or 4 more trips if you haven't shot before. If you have expertice in a firearm you will need only 1 or 2 more trips.

                        Hunting in enjoyable and rewarding. It should be respected. No messing around, no acting stupid, no drinking until the firearm is unloaded and safely stored.

                        Have fun, enjoy and be safe.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well lots of good advice here. Savage makes goods rifles, although I have not tried the Axis, but it should be fine.

                          What I would recommend is you go to the library and read every gun/hunting/game cooking-butchering book they have, and check out any back issues of all the gun/outdoor magazines (Outdoor Life, Field and Stream, Sports Afield, Hunting, etc) they have too.

                          Read the hunting regs a couple of times, sometimes they make little to no sense at first (or on the tenth read for that matter).

                          Contact the local DNR and see what THEY recommend as far as gear, most are very helpful.

                          You will ALWAYS need a good knife, and that isn't cheap, but it will last a lifetime.

                          You will ALWAYS need good footwear, and that isn't cheap either, but low quality junk will cripple you, if you are lucky, that is all that happens to you.

                          Compass and map.

                          Hope this helps.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Your rifle should be up to the task, .270 is a solid choice. However, if it came with a scope, I would remove that and replace with a Leupold, Nikon, Burris, 3x9x40 or 3x9x50 scope. In conjuction with your rifle and ammo a qualty scope is a must, unless you have adequate iron sights.

                            The rest of the stuff:

                            1. Quality binoculars for searching the area. You should not use the scope for this. Remember saftey lessons, only point the weapon at things you are prepared to shoot.
                            2. Good boots and adequate clothing for the environment. You don't have to have cammo, or spend alot here. Scent and movement will give you away.
                            3. Good knife, fixed or folder. 3-4 inch drop point blade is all you need.
                            4. Backpack or fannypack to carry gear, food, water.
                            5. Small flashlight or headlight. Get into the woods early, stay late.
                            6. Fully charged cell phone, map compass, or GPS.
                            7. That's mainly it, the following are nice to haves, TP, Marking tape, drag rope,snacks, bug repellant, small first aid kit, and PSK. Tell someone where you're going and when you'll be back.

                            Have fun.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Glad I came across this thread--I'm thinking of someday trying hunting. Thanks to all who posted info--very glad to listen in on this discussion.
                              Been there, done that. Then been there again several times, because apparently I never learn.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X