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  • Newbie to bows...

    I have an older compound bow and i am debating whether or not to spend the money to fix it up to use. What do I look for as far as potential problems and what is a good supplier of archery gear that won't destroy my meager budget. It needs a quiver, arrow shelf and sights. The bow is camo and has "Force II" printed on one of the limbs and the draw weight is set VERY high (75#?). Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Originally posted by MadScotsMan View Post
    the draw weight is set VERY high (75#?). Thanks in advance.
    Can you draw this bow comfortably, repeatedly? If you have to struggle with this your accuracy will suffer and you're gonna work your way to an elbow / shoulder injury.

    Try to locate a bowyer or take the bow to an archery shop and have your bow looked at.

    O.W.
    Things are seldom what they seem.

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    • #3
      i would suggest that you look into traditional archery and make your own bow... trust me, you'll never look at archery the same again...;)

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      • #4
        I hve been shooting traditional bows for about twenty years now, but have never attempted to make my own.I love shooting traditional bows and shoot pretty much year round. We even shoot areials in my back yard.

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        • #5
          To be honest, my only experience with bows is with traditional bows. I prefer them, but I picked this one up at a yard sale a couple of years ago for next to nothing. It is my intent to use it to hunt, particularly in a post SHTF situation where ammunition will be in short supply. The bow I have is uncomfortable to draw but I understand the draw weight is adjustable. Where I in a position to purchase a traditional bow, I would.

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          • #6
            I would take it to a bow shop to get it looked at if it has a weak area they will find it they will also be able to adjust the draw for you until your comfortable if it breaks in your hand 75# can really hurt you so be careful
            NONSOLIS RADIOS SEDIOUIS FULMINA MITTO

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            • #7
              I hadn't considered that possibility, Iron Mike! I'll have it checked out ASAP. Thanks for the advice everyone.

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              • #8
                If you are not familiar with compounds the best thing to do is to have a qualified archery pro shop look over the bow. I have had a compound bow blow up on me, and it is not fun. Gave me a nice cut down my face, and made me bow shy for a couple weeks. I was lucky I didn't loose an eye or worse!

                Some of the things that you can check for are similiar to a traditional, laminated bow. Check the limbs to see if they are delaminating. Also check to see if you can see any cracks in the limbs. After that look at the riser for any cracks, chips, points of weekness. Finally check the string/cables for anything that looks worn, ie fuzzy string, strands that have been cut, if the cables are metal is any of the rubber missing, cable frayed if they are made from string material they should not show any fraying, or broken strands. The final thing to check is that the cams (wheels) are not leaning one way or the other, they should be straight up and down and they should not have any damage, dents, chips, cracks, etc.

                Compound bows are not an ideal survival bow, they require much more maintence and care than a traditonal bow and are much more sensitive to rough treatment than is a recurve or long bow. The trade off is they are much more accurate. The analogy I make to a new archer is a compound is like the sniper rifle, it is great for taking very accurate, long range (relative) shots, where as the tradional bow is more like the shotgun, it comes up quicker but generally doesn't shoot as far. Both will require a mastery of skills, and many of them will transfer from one to another.

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                • #9
                  I myself prefer a recurve bow. I just purchased an all fiberglass bear recurve. It only has a draw weight of 35 lbs. but that is more than enough to kill a rabbit and other small game. I like bows for the simple reason they are quiet. Hunting with a bow also makes you a stronger hunter as you have to get closer to your prey. In a shtf situation the less noise you make the better off you are in my opinion.

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                  • #10
                    for all the people who posted on this thread i am getting my first compound bow this weekend! I have been wanting one for sometime... at first i leaned towards the crossbow, well needless to say i went to bass pro and held one, and i tried to run down the isle as fast as i could with one.. and well lol im 5"2 and the bow was just as tall as me and probably weighed more, that is why i have decided on the compound, its lightweight and easy for me to carry, i also prefer to have that over a gun i will let the husband handle the ammo, i dont need to be running rampid with a gun hehe, but i hear you guys talk of this recurve bow.. would it be harder to learn how to shoot it? i would like details please, because i havent gone and bought my bow yet. what would be best? thanks guys :)

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Hippiehomemaker View Post
                      f .... but i hear you guys talk of this recurve bow.. would it be harder to learn how to shoot it? i would like details please, because i haven't gone and bought my bow yet. what would be best? thanks guys :)
                      Recurves are simple bows .... simple in that there are no moving parts. However when drawing the recurve bow you sustain the the force / resistance / weight of the bow from the beginning of the draw until you release.

                      With a compound there are at least two cams with cables connected to the string. The cams are "timed" or synchronized, the draw weight is somewhat adjustable. The pro here is that there is initial resistance at the beginning of the draw until the cams roll over, then the resistance is reduced by as much as 70 percent or more which allows you to "rest" while acquiring your target.

                      The compounds can send heavier arrows down range faster and farther, which is not to say they are better than a recurve .... just different.

                      Read or re-read Eric Stanaway's post number 8 in this thread .... great info.

                      I have a couple of compounds .... if I could afford one I'd buy a recurve.

                      O.W.
                      Things are seldom what they seem.

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                      • #12
                        Some of you know I am a pro staff shooter for a whole bunch of archery companies and I work in a archery pro shop part time and have done this off and on since 1984. I will always say if you have a pro shop by you go and see them to at least get fitted. I shoot both traditional and modern equipment and proper fit is the most important part of being safe and accurate.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Omegaman View Post
                          Some of you know I am a pro staff shooter ....
                          Thanks for the reminder OmegaMan, now that you've mentioned it .... the memory fades quickly.

                          O.W.
                          Things are seldom what they seem.

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                          • #14
                            Definitely take it to a pro and get fitted properly, he'll measure your draw length, help you match the weight of your arrows to the weight of your broadheads. Also lower the draw weight, usually 65lbs. is plenty enough. I draw back at full draw. and then hold it for a minute. If I can do that without shaking or loosing track on the target then it's set properly for draw weight.

                            Joe
                            SEMPER PARATUS

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                            • #15
                              Compound bows

                              I agree with most of what was said as far as checking the risers, cams and strings/cable as far as adjusting the draw weight it is fairly easy to do. Disclaimer: I am no pro bowshop guy but I have had multiple compounds over the years. Having said that I do adjust my bows draw weight myself it's fairly easy to do. On your limbs you will find 2 limb bolts, 1 on the top limb and 1 one the bottom limb. These should accept some size Allen wrench. First I would begin by tightening these bolts clockwise as hand tight as possible. Then begin by turning each bolt approximately the same distance counterclockwise to lower the draw weight until comfortable. I'd start with about an eighth of a turn and then testing the weight. Do not rotate more than a couple full turns or you will compromise the integrity of the bow. By then you have let off enough weight for it to be comfortable anyway. Your bow if its set at 75lbs now should let down to 60lbs
                              Failing to plan is essentially planning to fail.

                              Once more into the fray
                              To the last good fight I'll ever know
                              Live and die on this day
                              Live and die on this day
                              from "The Grey"

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