Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hunting Skills: A Necessity for Emergency Preparedness

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hunting Skills: A Necessity for Emergency Preparedness

    Hunting Skills: A Necessity for Emergency Preparedness

    Hunting is not for everyone, but everyone should know how to hunt to some extent. If you end up in a survival situation without food, knowing how to find and catch prey will mean the difference between life and death. Learning several different hunting techniques using only items that you would find in nature or have in your survival gear [2] will give you one more advantage when it comes to emergency preparedness [3].

    The most important aspect of hunting is knowing what animals are in your survival area and how to find them. Look for signs that would indicate which animals are moving through and where. Search for trails that they have formed, evidence of bedding down, dens or burrows, markings on the vegetation and scat. Once the types of animals have been determined, think about how and when they eat, drink, sleep, and move. Knowing your prey’s behaviors will greatly increase your odds of capturing them.

    Several hunting methods will be mentioned here. Some require more skill and technique than others. Pick the ones that seem feasible to you and research them. There are vast resources online that cover these methods extensively, including videos that demonstrate how to construct and use them.

    •Gun: You may carry a firearm in your survival kit. If so, you have undoubtedly been trained in the safe operation of the weapon and have practiced its use by shooting at a target. This is clearly the most effective method of hunting in a survival situation.

    •Rocks and Sticks: A heavy object that can be thrown at prey is a very simple method of hunting. It does require getting relatively close to the animal, good aim and the ability to throw quick and hard.

    •Spear: One of the oldest forms of hunting with weapons, spears are versatile and readily available. Spears can be used for thrusting, stabbing, or throwing and can be used to hunt birds, mammals, and fish. They can be as simple as a sharpened stick, or a spearhead can be attached that was fashioned from stone, bone, wood or steel.

    •Throwing stick: Resembling a boomerang, this hard stick has a bend of about 45 degrees in it and is carved on opposite sides of the legs to enable lift. This method requires a great deal of skill and practice and may not be the most practical in a survival situation.

    •Bow and Arrow: Also an effective choice for hunting, this weapon can be fashioned from hardwood saplings, such as oak, maple or ash, and paracord that should be in your survival kit. Boot strings would work in a pinch. Again, this method requires some practice before your survival is dependent on it.

    •Snare: There are many styles of snares with varying degrees of difficulty. They require some research, but can be well suited to hunting in most situations for a variety of animals. Snares need to be set in natural trails and funnels built on both sides so that the prey is forced to walk into the trap.

    Emergency preparedness [3] is about thinking through possible scenarios you may find yourself in and planning accordingly. Take time to consider how you would capture prey if your life depended on it. Add a few items to your survival kit that would make hunting by way of these methods easier. Practice some of them beforehand so that you aren’t trying to figure them out when your survival depends on it.

  • #2
    Focusing on snares,traps,and dead falls will free you up for other activities.Small game,squirrels and rabbits,usually have specific runs and feeding areas and can easily be trapped with the right equipment and knowledge.I would concentrate my efforts here first,then hunt for larger animals such as deer.

    Knowing the area you are hunting in is paramount to success,look for trails,choke points,and holes in fences for snare sets.

    A weekend survival test is a must,honing your skills and actually prepping for a time when you might need to center your survival on these skills

    Comment


    • #3
      i truly think hunting is for everyone knowledge to know not to exercise the ones who do have the skills havve a status quoe hence they are needed everyone has a place
      the pack that plays together stays together

      Comment


      • #4
        when I was younger hunting was a part of growing up a good hunting season meant lots of meat for the table we were not desperate or anything but every little thing helped we hunted deer,rabbit,squirrel,raccoon,opossum,frogs,crayfis h,and all manner of fowl I hope these skills are as sharp as I remember them when I retire from the military haven't had a lot of time to hunt since I enlisted just here and there been pretty successful though.
        NONSOLIS RADIOS SEDIOUIS FULMINA MITTO

        Comment


        • #5
          Getting out and practicing is a very important part. Even if you live in the city and have to wait in line for range time it can make a big difference in the long run. Playing catch in the yard will help with rocks, sticks and other throwing devices.

          Comment


          • #6
            One thing I would like to add;
            If you are in a survival/ WSHTF situation you will greatly improve your chances of acquiring game if you are ready to "hunt" at all times. This means always have some form of hunting tool at hand no matter what you are doing. Always be prepared to take game at anytime. When you are fetching water you may scare up a rabbit or see crawdads. When you are hiking from point A to point B you may spot a deer. If you are looking for a spot to set snares you will very likely spot the very critter you intend to snare and be able to eat while your snares are busy working on the next meal. Etc. I may be wrong but it seems that I see more wildlife when I am doing day to day things than I do when I am actively hunting.
            SQUARE PEG IN A ROUND HOLE

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by nakadnu View Post
              One thing I would like to add;
              If you are in a survival/ WSHTF situation you will greatly improve your chances of acquiring game if you are ready to "hunt" at all times. This means always have some form of hunting tool at hand no matter what you are doing. Always be prepared to take game at anytime. When you are fetching water you may scare up a rabbit or see crawdads. When you are hiking from point A to point B you may spot a deer. If you are looking for a spot to set snares you will very likely spot the very critter you intend to snare and be able to eat while your snares are busy working on the next meal. Etc. I may be wrong but it seems that I see more wildlife when I am doing day to day things than I do when I am actively hunting.
              I think you nailed it. Always have your weapon ready you can always dry it and save it. Also I think RFO probably wanted folks to take the OP and expand on it to broaden there thinking about hunting options.

              Comment


              • #8
                ElmerKeith talked about having a pistol for "targets of opportunity" while in the field... I believe he was right!

                Comment


                • #9
                  It is better to travel to hunt for meat instead of where you are taking shelter. Once an area gets hunted often the game will move out of an area. That way if you get injured or snowed in, or any other emergency, you won't have ran your meals out of that area. Also remember, in a situation where you don't want others to know you are around, only shoot once. That way they won't know exactly which way the shot came from. Rat traps will also catch small game like squirrels, and such.
                  G.I.H.S.O. Going In Hot, Safety Off.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Has anyone ever considered the possibility of using a casting net to catch small land animals. It works so great at catching aquatic animals. I think certain animals in certain scenarios might be vulnerable to it, anyway im a big fan of nets and a good working knowledge of making and using nets could prove very valuable in a survival scenario, it would be good to know how to make a custom net to suite your needs, a large net dropped out of the trees could bring in a lot of game.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Traps and snares will produce more meat than hunting traps and snares work 24/7. The easiest trap trigger to make is the Promontory Peg (I rediscovered its use) all it takes is a stick and a sharp rock.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A thing to consider for cheap easy traps are Rat and Mouse traps. Drill a hole thru them to affix to a tree or something, bait them up and come back later. This is a great tool for catching squirrels BTW.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I carry 3 small cable snares and 3 large cable snares in my survival kit, I also carry snares in my coat pockets.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If you are augmenting your table fare in conditions we are in today, hunting can certainly help you do that. Should the preverbal SHTF event occur and the "normal" means of acquiring food that most are accustomed to has been disrupted, the forest and fields will see a lot of traffic and game will become scarce in a very short time. Deer, wild turkey, bear, elk... whatever... will be pushed into more remote areas or even disappear altogether. Deer in my state were practically wiped long before the Depression ended.

                            I imagine a lot of us will be eating the not so glamorous animals - opossum, coon, groundhog, young crows, song birds, and whatever else you can catch without expending a lot of precious energy. Trapping is much more productive, as someone mentioned. Get yourself some traps and learn how to use them.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Some very good points brought up here that should be focused on:
                              1) Traps and snares do the work for you while you concentrate on other things and if done right will produce more than hunting.
                              2) With that said, always be prepare to hunt while doing the everyday tasks. Whether you carry a throwing stick, sligshot or pack some heat be ready to look up and find a curious critter watching whats going on. Animals are constantly on the alert for predators so, when they spot you trying to slip through the woods, they see a predator and slip away. On the flip side, when you're going about your business and not projecting a threat, curiosity/complacency will get the best of some and present you with a meal.
                              3) Don't actively hunt to close to the homestead. As mentioned, when the local game population percieves you as a predator they'll move on.
                              Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X