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  • #16
    Actually, i like one with a bit of a bend, but I just meant one that is fairly sturdy- I think I can probably kill a coyote with a 1.5" green hardwood stick at least 18" long. I know it works for a bunch of critters under 20 pounds.

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    • #17
      This may be hard for some of you to believe and it cost me $20 but now I'm a believer. I used to work construction with this guy that grew up way, way, way back up in the hills of east Tennessee. He used to tell us that he and his brothers could run a rabbit down on foot and did it all the time when he was younger and we all thought that he was full of s--t. Well one day we gave him a ride home after work and there was a rabbit sitting in his front yard so we tried to get him to chase it down. After the 3 of us agreed to cough up $20 apiece if he could do it, he jumped out of the truck and took off after the rabbit. He didn't catch it with speed but with persistance. He started off after the rabbit and of course it took off hauling a-- but he just stayed on his tail as best as he could and after a couple of minutes he caught it. He splained it this way. The rabbit has great speed for short distances but tuckers out very fast. He will run just a short way then rest. If you can stay close enough to him so that he doesn't get his rest periods, then he tuckers out and you can walk right up to them and catch them. Probably be best for a teen or younger person cause I know at 50 I don't have the wind for it. Hell I didn't have the wind for it 30 years ago when I saw it. Has anybody else ever heard of this?

      P.S. This was done in a residential neighborhood so the grass was mowed and there were no fence rows or blackberry brambles to hide in.
      Last edited by 10eckid; 05-25-2011, 01:27 PM. Reason: spelling
      " If you want to live, treat me good " Peter Tosh

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Curdog View Post
        Turtles, porkypines, frogs, and maybe possums. Anyone who catches a coon or a groundhog with their hands probably will regret it very much indeed. Use a stout stick!
        I had wounded a wild tukey one time with the bow, although I knew it would die I also new if it kept going the direction it did I would never find it so I started chasing it. I did a circle to push it in the opposite direction and finally caught it, but in the end I ended up with 3-4 stitches. One of his spurs left 2 pretty good gashes in my wrist. A throwing stick is a good idea!

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        • #19
          Well, definitely a lot of squirrels around here. Raccoons also, but eating a raccoon don't sound too good. I would if I had to though.
          I guess if I went west towards the burbs, there would be lots of deer. Good deer hunting here in Illinois. Lots of corn for em to eat.

          Edit: lol oh by hand. Yeah, none of those could be caught by hand. A frog would be my first choice then.
          I'll keep my guns, freedom, and money... YOU CAN KEEP THE "CHANGE"!

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          • #20
            In my area at this time of year the easiest land critters to catch would likely be earthworms, and snakes..(if we are allowing water critters, than cray finsh turtles and frogs can all be obtained easily enough)
            Earthworms, and other insects can be find in mass under fallen leaf debris here, and it is easy to amass a good quantity of them while gathering debris for a shelter
            Now its not as dynamic as catching a large warm blooded animal (which would certainly be preferable)
            but there is minimal calorie expenditure, and minimal risk of getting injured or perhaps bitten by a potentially rabid animal. (rabies is fairly common in some areas by me) as far as snakes go I see several of them every time I go out in warm weather.. they can usually be crept up on while basking.. and despite the fact that it is not uncommon to find a 4 foot snake.. around, there are only 2 species of venomous ones here, and they are rare.
            if I;m using my hands to hunt, I want minimal effort minimla risk, and decent pay off. and if that means I might have to choke down a few mouth fulls of roasted nasties.. untill I can fabricate a weapon that will allow me to minimize the risk of taking a larger animal than I guess it will do.
            If we are excluding creepy crawlies than possums would be a good bet... I 've had several just freeze up on my when pursued with any tenacity ..and although i;ve always let them be at that point it would be easy enough to secure a meal with a well placed boot heel at that point.

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            • #21
              Turtle....geese....ground hog.....there are some very trusting mallards around here....

              traps and snares would be a better bet....but it could be done.

              I'm going to buy some more .22lr.....indirectly using hands....:)
              Live like you'll die tomorrow, learn like you'll live forever.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Domdabears View Post
                Raccoons also, but eating a raccoon don't sound too good.
                coons purty good if it is cleaned well- like roast beef, but real rich.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Curdog View Post
                  coons purty good if it is cleaned well- like roast beef, but real rich.
                  Actually, if made right coon does taste awesome. You have to be careful cleaning them though because of their glands.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by bushbum riley View Post
                    In my area at this time of year the easiest land critters to catch would likely be earthworms, and snakes..(if we are allowing water critters, than cray finsh turtles and frogs can all be obtained easily enough)
                    Earthworms, and other insects can be find in mass under fallen leaf debris here, and it is easy to amass a good quantity of them while gathering debris for a shelter
                    Now its not as dynamic as catching a large warm blooded animal (which would certainly be preferable)
                    but there is minimal calorie expenditure, and minimal risk of getting injured or perhaps bitten by a potentially rabid animal. (rabies is fairly common in some areas by me) as far as snakes go I see several of them every time I go out in warm weather.. they can usually be crept up on while basking.. and despite the fact that it is not uncommon to find a 4 foot snake.. around, there are only 2 species of venomous ones here, and they are rare.
                    if I;m using my hands to hunt, I want minimal effort minimla risk, and decent pay off. and if that means I might have to choke down a few mouth fulls of roasted nasties.. untill I can fabricate a weapon that will allow me to minimize the risk of taking a larger animal than I guess it will do.
                    If we are excluding creepy crawlies than possums would be a good bet... I 've had several just freeze up on my when pursued with any tenacity ..and although i;ve always let them be at that point it would be easy enough to secure a meal with a well placed boot heel at that point.
                    You make a great point! You don't want to waste any more energy then necessary. Snakes, worms and turtles are very good choices in my area also. We have a few Timber Rattlers, but nothing else considered poisonous at all. This is why the porqupine makes such an easy target, they are very slow.

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                    • #25
                      Armadillos are starting to show up here in Middle Tennessee. They don't look like they would be hard to catch. Any of yall that live further south, have you ever caught and eat an armadillo?
                      " If you want to live, treat me good " Peter Tosh

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                      • #26
                        [QUOTE=10eckid;42729]Armadillos are starting to show up here in Middle Tennessee. They don't look like they would be hard to catch. Any of yall that live further south, have you ever caught and eat an armadillo?[/QUO

                        Cook the meat well...

                        4. Do armadillos carry diseases, such as leprosy?

                        Wild armadillos have been known to be infected with the bacterium that causes leprosy (Hansen’s disease). The only cases of transmission from armadillos to humans have occurred in rare incidents in which people ate undercooked armadillo meat. If you have a pet (such as a dog, cat, or two-year old) that has recently interacted with an armadillo, you needn't worry about the danger of your pet becoming infected. So long as your dog, cat, or two-year old hasn't been dining on armadillo sushi, you have little cause for concern. Even if your pet does bite an armadillo, the risk of infection is quite low. Your pet is much more likely to be in danger of illness do to encounters with raccoons (prone to rabies), other dogs, cats or children than a (mostly) harmless armadillo.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Snow Walker View Post
                          What is the easiest creature to catch in your area in a survival situation for food? Stictly land creatures and no domestic pets.(That would be cheating!) lol

                          For us it would be the Porqupine, believe it or not it's not as dangerous as some people may think.
                          A "survival situation" and you rule out domestic pets? You do know what happens when domestic "pets" get really, really hungry don't you? You know what feral means? Eat'em before they get to skinny or the meat is awful stringy. Damn, that rhymes.

                          "Aye, dog makes a fine meal." Quoted from Mel Gibson as Benjamin Martin in The Patriot

                          Long Hunter
                          RLTW!

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Long_Hunter View Post
                            A "survival situation" and you rule out domestic pets? You do know what happens when domestic "pets" get really, really hungry don't you? You know what feral means? Eat'em before they get to skinny or the meat is awful stringy. Damn, that rhymes.

                            "Aye, dog makes a fine meal." Quoted from Mel Gibson as Benjamin Martin in The Patriot

                            Long Hunter
                            RLTW!
                            Who said I would rule out domestic pets? I simply stated that because a domestic pet is a give me, it's good to keep the mind working by thinking of the not so obvious.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Snow Walker View Post
                              Who said I would rule out domestic pets? I simply stated that because a domestic pet is a give me, it's good to keep the mind working by thinking of the not so obvious.
                              If we open it up to domestic critters....I'm set around here....:)
                              Live like you'll die tomorrow, learn like you'll live forever.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Echo2 View Post
                                If we open it up to domestic critters....I'm set around here....:)
                                No doubt about that...how do tender little puppies sound? lol

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