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  • Catching food by hand

    What is the easiest creature to catch in your area in a survival situation for food? Stictly land creatures and no domestic pets.(That would be cheating!) lol

    For us it would be the Porqupine, believe it or not it's not as dangerous as some people may think.

  • #2
    Well if its only by hand I can't think of many land creatures that could feasibly be caught with just bare hands, but im guessing groundhogs would probably be the best in our area, stake them out and and then position yourself over the hole and wait or whistle to draw them out, then grab them, never actually tried it but it could probably work, i've actually caught several moles by hand, but not much to eat there, oppossum are also pretty prolific and not very fast. I'd still try to ambush some groundhogs by barehand first as they taste pretty good.

    Also I'd like to know just how one would go about catching a porqupine by bare hand, that seems like it could be a little tricky.

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    • #3
      This is why I wanted to post this thread so we could get an idea of what other parts of the country have available to them in this aspect. You don't have porqupines down there?

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      • #4
        I hate raccoons. We have tons around here. Most the hippies in the neighborhood think its cute to feed them. I disagree. I have babies to look after, and they stroll up on the porches looking for handouts. Sometimes they are aggressive, and if I could, Id grab it and wring its little neck. But, since I cant, ....well Ruger takes care of them for me.
        We have tons of wild duck and geese. Rabbits are pretty common too. Never tried to catch them, but the ducks would be easy.. :) I may be wrong, but I never have come across a porcupine in Ohio.
        If the zombies chase us, Im tripping you!!!

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        • #5
          Yeah I've never seen a porcupine around here either, the geese would be quite easy to catch around here they'll run right at you

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          • #6
            Originally posted by maric View Post
            I hate raccoons. We have tons around here. Most the hippies in the neighborhood think its cute to feed them. I disagree. I have babies to look after, and they stroll up on the porches looking for handouts. Sometimes they are aggressive, and if I could, Id grab it and wring its little neck. But, since I cant, ....well Ruger takes care of them for me.
            We have tons of wild duck and geese. Rabbits are pretty common too. Never tried to catch them, but the ducks would be easy.. :) I may be wrong, but I never have come across a porcupine in Ohio.
            I agree with the concern for your children! Here is a little something I found for you...all it takes is a kid putting their hands in their mouth so be careful and I hope you find this helpful

            Most common way people catch it: "Dirty" hand touches mouth. Put contaminated object directly into mouth.

            Worst-case scenario: Death.

            How common in the Northeast? Although the worm is common in raccoons, few people contract the disease.

            Most vulnerable groups: Young children.

            This disease is caused by a parasite, a roundworm called Baylisascaris procyonis. The roundworm larvae cause problems as they travel through the person's muscles and various organs, including the liver, brain, lungs, and eyes. The severity of the infection depends on how many of the parasite's eggs were ingested, and where the larvae migrate. Although serious infections are rare, raccoon roundworm can be fatal in people.

            Raccoons are the primary host of this roundworm, which is commonly found in their small intestines. The parasite has also been found in mice, squirrels, rabbits, birds, woodchucks, and dogs.

            How do you catch it?
            Raccoons shed millions of the microscopic roundworm eggs in their feces. It takes about a month for newly deposited eggs to develop to the infective stage. The eggs can only develop into worms when they're in an animal's body, but the eggs are hardy and may survive for years in soil, sand, or water.

            People may encounter the eggs through direct contact with raccoon droppings or by touching a contaminated area or object. If they don't wash their hands, they may later transfer the eggs to their mouths. Small children are particularly vulnerable because they tend to put their hands, and other objects such as bark, wood chips, toys, soil, or even droppings, into their mouths.

            Other animals may become infected by eating an infected animal or through contact with the feces of an infected animal.

            Symptoms
            Symptoms in people may include nausea, skin irritations, tiredness, liver enlargement, loss of coordination and muscle control, blindness, inattentiveness, and coma.

            Raccoons rarely show symptoms of the disease but the species that don't usually play host to this worm (such as woodchucks, squirrels, birds) tend to show abnormal behaviors when infested. They'll tilt their heads and have difficulty walking or climbing. They may lose their fear of people, circle, roll on the ground, fall over, lay on their sides and paddle their feet, or fall into a coma.

            Treatment
            If someone's been exposed, or even suspects exposure to raccoon roundworm, seek immediate medical care. If the worms can be killed before they migrate through the body, there's a very good chance that the disease will be prevented. But if the condition is not treated early, recovery is less assured. Raccoon roundworm infections are very difficult to diagnose in people.

            Protection on the job
            If you're working in an area that's contaminated with raccoon feces, wear a proper respirator, rubber gloves, rubber boots, and disposable coveralls. Because the eggs are resistant to common disinfectants, the feces and any contaminated materials should be burned. If that's not feasible, double-bag the materials and bury them deeply.

            Contaminated clothing can be double-bagged and discarded, or washed in boiling water with bleach. Scrub rubber boots with bleach and a scrub brush. Clean traps before storing, to remove feces while they are fresh. Traps and other equipment that can withstand the heat can be flamed. If that's impractical, clean with boiling water and bleach.

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            • #7
              Snow Walker! I really appreciate the info! The little ones often play on the porch where the coons tend to come. There are times that they (the coons) will come across something that was left out like a snack bag or something... My daughter is always putting something in her mouth, so yes, I do need to be very careful! It actually makes me sick just thinking about it! Thanks for posting!
              If the zombies chase us, Im tripping you!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by collector View Post
                Yeah I've never seen a porcupine around here either, the geese would be quite easy to catch around here they'll run right at you
                lol.. I know! They come "spitting" at us all the time! I bet I could take 'em though, well I dont know. :)
                If the zombies chase us, Im tripping you!!!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by maric View Post
                  Snow Walker! I really appreciate the info! The little ones often play on the porch where the coons tend to come. There are times that they (the coons) will come across something that was left out like a snack bag or something... My daughter is always putting something in her mouth, so yes, I do need to be very careful! It actually makes me sick just thinking about it! Thanks for posting!
                  Your Welcome, we all have to watch out for the little ones. I always had to watch my daughter like a hawk and still do!

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                  • #10
                    @Snow walker great info on the racoon round worms. Thanks.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PT945 View Post
                      @Snow walker great info on the racoon round worms. Thanks.
                      Glad to see it could help. Your Welcome!

                      One thing that I wanted to mention was about this guy who had lived with wolves for a long time studying them. He actually was accepted by the pack and would even sleep with them. Anyway, one of the interesting things was he never picked up any type of a disease, infection or parasite while doing it.

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                      • #12
                        Around here we can easily catch rats, mice, and Canadian geese and probably several other small animals I am not thinking of right now.
                        Mountain Man J :cool:

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                        • #13
                          Turtles, porkypines, frogs, and maybe possums. Anyone who catches a coon or a groundhog with their hands probably will regret it very much indeed. Use a stout stick!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Curdog View Post
                            Turtles, porkypines, frogs, and maybe possums. Anyone who catches a coon or a groundhog with their hands probably will regret it very much indeed. Use a stout stick!
                            A stout stick... is that like a bent stick, kinda like a.. boomerangish type thing?? lol.
                            If the zombies chase us, Im tripping you!!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by maric View Post
                              A stout stick... is that like a bent stick, kinda like a.. boomerangish type thing?? lol.
                              Good Lord, that was a blonde moment, sheese.. you just mean a thick, sturdy stick, right? Ive seen survivalism videos where a bent like stick is used to "wack" smaller prey.. Sorry, my bad.. :)
                              Last edited by maric; 05-24-2011, 03:35 PM. Reason: spelling mistakes and general brainfart
                              If the zombies chase us, Im tripping you!!!

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