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Is this woman, and hunters like her, ethical?

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  • Armyjimbo
    replied
    If I don't eat it I don't harvest it.

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  • Cedar
    replied
    My opinion is that anyone wearing that much makeup, including lipstick while hunting bear, then yes, she is a trophy hunter as she is expecting her photo to be taken with that kill. If she was interested in hunting, she would have had that meat processed, not given it to charity.

    I figure it is similar to sport fishing. If I am going to go fishing and hurt that animal, it is going to end up in my frying pan. If I am not hungry for fish, I do not go fishing. If I am craving fish for dinner, I pack my truck with a lunch, head up to my fav little lake, and take just enough for dinner. I take a picture of my catch for the day, but I can promise you I am not putting lipstick on to get the photo.

    Cedar

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  • Cedar
    replied
    Originally posted by jeager View Post
    Eating suckers is not a good idea. Perfectly edible they are but so bony you'd
    likely choke to death.
    I pressure can some fish with the bone (sometimes it ends up that way), and the bones in the pressure canning process are easily edible and are added calcium source which may be a good idea not to overlook.

    Cedar

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  • AxelSurvive
    replied
    That is the problem with the moral of the anti-hunters. They seems to forget that the food they buy in the market was an animal which was killed to feeding them

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  • jeager
    replied
    I don't kill anything I don't eat unless nuisance species like crow, grackles, groundhogs
    and such.
    Even a young half grown groundhog goes in the frying pan.
    Some city people learn I eat squirrels and are down right disgusted.
    They don't have a clue that squirrels are even edible.
    Not only edible but very, very, good eating.
    I fixed a mess for my fiance and she devoured the things with reckless abandon.
    Well that's a stretch but she liked 'em.
    We just now came in from catching really nice bluegills 10 to 12".
    Now I have to clean 'em up for supper.

    It's pretty hard to starve an ol' hillbilly.

    Reminds me of a story that happened decades ago.
    My friend Bob and I were both cops.
    We got permission to fish a creek teeming with big suckers.
    We showed up with rod,real, worms and caught a few.
    The ol' land owner came to see how we were doing and we showed him
    "I thought you were gonna get a bunch" he said as he lit a half stick of
    DYNAMITE!
    He back off and said " Were I you boys I'd run!"

    WE RAN!
    Ka-boom. We picked up a couple dozen really big dead suckers.

    Eating suckers is not a good idea. Perfectly edible they are but so bony you'd
    likely choke to death.
    We cut 'em up for fertilizer.
    Same with carp.
    Makes for big, good tomatoes.

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  • OldCoot
    replied
    I worked for a hunting guide a couple of seasons as a packer (never again brutal work) and the majority of the hunters only concern was a trophy. Most did not want the meat citing it was too expensive to have it processed and shipped yet they do not blink a eye at spending 10k for a guided hunt. Most times the meat was gave to a local native village or divided among the crew. To me this is a total disregard of what hunting is really about.

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  • jeager
    replied
    Originally posted by rabunmom View Post
    Yes I think it was a trophy kill. I hate the idea that people kill animals just for the sport, if you hunt you should eat what you killed.
    Yes. This^^^^^.

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  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by Morgan101 View Post
    Dalewick: You have forgotten more about wildlife management than I will ever know. I always appreciate your opinion. I was under the impression (maybe naively so) that a Green Hunt was the same experience as a real hunt, on the ground as you described it. You just tranquilized the animal rather killing it. I was also under the impression that the animal was not harmed. Maybe this is info put out by the people who are selling Green Hunts. Still, my heart hurt to think of that old Black Rhino being put down. I think there is a soft spot in my heart (maybe in my head) for rhinos in general. If it was in a controlled environment couldn't it have been put out to pasture, so to speak, and spend its last days in peace?

    Thanks for your input and perspective.
    Morgan, Most wild rhino's are currently under 24 hour a day armed guards, to prevent or reduce poaching. It may have simply been a case that the managing agency knew the animal was beyond it's breeding capability or in reduced health and was then worth more as a "custom hunt" where the money is used for managing the remaining population and possibly even purchasing additional land for habitat. Which not only benefits the rhinos but all other wildlife species and then also helping the local citizens by spreading the wealth of visiting tourist and sanctioned hunting. Tourism and hunting are proving themselves to benefit the locals to the degree that the locals are self monitoring and control poachers. Poaching benefits only the poacher, while hunting with all of the people the lodges and professional hunters hire benefits the community. A win, win.

    Dale

    Additional info: http://phasa.co.za/what-is-in-the-ne...n-hunting.html
    Last edited by dalewick; 05-22-2015, 07:10 PM.

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  • Morgan101
    replied
    Dalewick: You have forgotten more about wildlife management than I will ever know. I always appreciate your opinion. I was under the impression (maybe naively so) that a Green Hunt was the same experience as a real hunt, on the ground as you described it. You just tranquilized the animal rather killing it. I was also under the impression that the animal was not harmed. Maybe this is info put out by the people who are selling Green Hunts. Still, my heart hurt to think of that old Black Rhino being put down. I think there is a soft spot in my heart (maybe in my head) for rhinos in general. If it was in a controlled environment couldn't it have been put out to pasture, so to speak, and spend its last days in peace?

    Thanks for your input and perspective.

    Leave a comment:


  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by Morgan101 View Post
    I recently read that some guy paid $350,000.00 to shoot an endangered Black Rhino. According to the report the Rhino was old and not an integral part of a population. The money was going to conservation for the Black Rhino. It still didn't sit well with me. It just seemed wrong. I get both sides of the argument, but why not a "Green Hunt". You go through all of the same processes as a regular hunt, but the animal is tranquilized. Take your pictures, and leave. The animal wakes up with a headache. Why did he have to kill it? Shouldn't the be some dignity for an animal that survives that long?
    Morgan,
    I understand your feelings on what I consider a "canned hunt" but I'm not a fan of "Green hunts" either. It's not the killing of the animal that I object to but the ethics of fair play in the hunt. If you want to hunt dangerous game animals that can kill you, then hunt them on the ground with the animal so it has the opportunity to kill you also.

    The biological and management aspects of hunting though, is to kill and remove those animals from the population. Either for habitat management or for managing the human/wildlife conflict dynamics. Without hunting (human and natural predation) the wildlife is subject to the forces of nature which are very destructive,(disease, starvation, etc.) not only the for the wildlife populations but also for there habitats. Green hunts do nothing to enhance wildlife management and often result in the death of the tranquilized animal anyway after it has been released. Which results in the waste of that animal. Wild animals are often stressed to the point of death when tranquilized, even with the best of after action/capture treatment.
    Just wanted to put the info out there as it's often kept quiet within the wildlife management profession.

    Dale

    Leave a comment:


  • Morgan101
    replied
    I recently read that some guy paid $350,000.00 to shoot an endangered Black Rhino. According to the report the Rhino was old and not an integral part of a population. The money was going to conservation for the Black Rhino. It still didn't sit well with me. It just seemed wrong. I get both sides of the argument, but why not a "Green Hunt". You go through all of the same processes as a regular hunt, but the animal is tranquilized. Take your pictures, and leave. The animal wakes up with a headache. Why did he have to kill it? Shouldn't the be some dignity for an animal that survives that long?

    Leave a comment:


  • Capt Nat
    replied
    It's hard to put my feelings on this into words accurately.

    With the building of highways, cities, farms, etc, we changed the environment. Because of those changes, animal populations now have to be controlled. I think every state has created a department to regulate wildlife and manage those populations. It is through those regulations that hunting now takes place. If the hunting that they license and even encourage did not take place, the ensuing overpopulation would be horrible for both the animals and us people. Therefore, I fully support the states hunting programs.

    That said, I am against cruelty and lack of respect toward animals. All life is sacred and should be treated as such. I think most sport hunters have that respect. All the hunters I have been around take great effort to waste as little of the kill as is reasonable. I think the plight of hunted animals is much better than most "food" animals like cattle, chickens, and pigs.

    From a young boy, I grew up hunting and my Dad taught be about the respect and importance of "waste not". However, I don't hunt anymore. After spending a number of years hunting and taking men, I find no thrill or interest in hunting animals now. If I needed to kill an animal to eat, I wouldn't give it a second thought. I would thank the animal and God for the blessing.

    In a country where nobody is more than an hour to a grocery store, I think all hunters are hunting for sport. As long as they're not cruel or wasteful, I'm glad they are there. If they weren't hunting for sport, I would have to occasionally shoot a bear to be safe. Driving would be hazardous. I would hate to have to see the starving, diseased, and injured animals everywhere.

    The state of Florida seems to be doing an excellent job. I see quite a bit of wildlife. It looks to be very healthy. The territory of predatory animals like bear and panther are actually expanding.

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  • jimLE
    replied
    it'd be understanding if a person has plenty of bear meat,or simply dont like the taste of bear meat.when it comes to donating it..then turn around and show it off,is understandable..people shoot and kill deer for the meat then have it's head mounted to show it off as well,all the time.now why should she do any different?especially if she keeps things right on her part.pluss others are getting to put meat into their stomachs..

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  • Applejack
    replied
    I come from a long line of hunters in my family as well as have a few friends that hunt. They do it to put meat on the table. That woman looks like she killed that bear for sport not for food. I can't see killing an animal unless it is for food. If not for yourself than at least to donate the food for people in need of food.

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  • Paratrooper89
    replied
    I have watched Jim Shockey over the years. I and I know he has traveled the world on hunting trips ,taking his family with him. His son and daughter grew up in that type of environment. He started out as a guide and believes in fare chase and conservation, so I know Eva does also. It was how she was raised. The same way i raised my boys and will help raise my grandchildren. I have taught them, that if your not going to eat it do not kill it and I also taught them to hunt for meat not a trophy. BUT a trophy is in the eye of the beholder. Every animal I have taken is a trophy in some sort of way. And if the meat your taken happens to be the biggest deer, bear, hog or whatever it is your hunting, will that's just more meat in the freezer, and if you have to much, donate it to a good cause. I share my kills with family and friends. I think its awesome that she donates some of the meat to charity. We had a program like that here a few years back, we have a hog problem and what hog meat we ,as in the hunters, keep we gave to the local home less shelters and kitchens to help feed the poor and homeless. But some politician got involved some how and stop that, said it had to be FDA approved meat. I also think this country needs to wake up and look at whats being put in our food at the farms and what not, one day they will see the light. An another thing that gets me, is on a lot of the "hunting " shows. They call themselves " sportsmen" and not hunters. They are the trophy hunters. They don't hunt for meat, and that's given us, the hunters, a bad rap.

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