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    registror
    Valued Member

  • registror
    replied
    Originally posted by survivalguy View Post
    space blankets are great shelter material and are very lightweight and take up no space at all in your pack only downside is once unfolded you'll never fold it up again so use it for tinder ..burns great. :)
    they suck, bro. They cause condensation if you seal them up and lose your body heat to convection /breezes if you dont. You can't let them touch you, especially not to also touch the ground, cause your body heat will go right thru them. A heavy duty one saved my life one cold, windy, rainy night, but it sucked the big one, you can do MUCH better . Here is the place to go. 2.5 lbs and $150 for the pair. Very compact, Get both the regular and the xl. if it's really cold put the regular inside of the large one and you'll have a layer of trapped air all around you. Get on a pile of debris, hopefully dry, and you'll sleep ok at 40F, in just pants and shirt. you can exercise your way thru a night at 30F, or handle 20F if you've got a BEESWAX candle in the UCO lantern, It helps a LOT if you've got 1 lb of net hammock, a couple of 1/4 lb each full body bugnet bags and 3 of the 2.3 oz each 55 gallon drum liners and a bit of tape. When you've got those items, you can sleep ok at 20F. without any external heat. If you'll take a double layered oval of clear PEVA shower curtain and tie, clamp or tape it around the open end of the bivvies, and then 'aim" the one way projected heat of a Siberian fire lay at the PEVA, from a safe 5 ft away, you can sleep ok at 10F, with just pants and shirt. and if you add the other stuff, the candle or the hot rocks/water bottles, you can get thru some really cold nights without being harmed. You wont sleep much, tho. It almost always warms up 20F degrees by the afternoon, tho, so sleep during the day. if it's that cold. These bivvies are fully zippered and can be worn as ponchos. So I dont bother with heavy winter clothing, except balaclava, shemagh, sockliners, gloves and glove liners.

    https://www.2gosystems.com/products/...ant=5897656453

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  • CountryGuy
    Valued Member

  • CountryGuy
    replied
    Dang that is nice. Someone had some mad sewing skills... good thought on Piterest, I always forget about the cool stuff there.

    Not sure about the printed tyvec; but if you're correct that FrogToggs are tyvek, then it must be in someway dye-able/ printable as I've seen those suits in about every color of the rainbow. A nice OD dye job followed by spray dye or paint for some improvised homemade pattern could work...

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  • dalewick
    Valued Member

  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by CountryGuy View Post

    You know I don't know... But the pack could be a great idea. You could probably sew up lots of things with a heavy thread or heavy test fishing line then wipe the seams with some silicon caulk and wala waterproof. Does give ideas like packs, ponchos, shelters, flys etc... I wonder if when washing if it'd take a dye... hmmm might have to see if I can find a house build and scrounge or check out the lumber yards for some remnants. I think a lot of places use it or a similar for lumber covers now also.
    Country, I'm sure it can be dyed. I just don't know what type of dye or ink it takes for coloring. I've actually been trying to figure out if there is a Tyvek material available preprinted in multicam pattern. Would make a great material for any number of clothing (rain gear) and carry gear (packs & bags). I also included a pic of a DIY pack made from Tyvek (not mine) and you should check out Pinterest for DIY Tyvek projects. Finding scraps for projects in my area is almost impossible. Not much being built.

    Dale

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  • lalakai
    Valued Member

  • lalakai
    replied
    we play an interesting game at work that goes along with this. Once a week someone brings in a common ordinary "thing" (coffee mug, screw driver, tooth brush, etc.), then the rest of us come up with ideas of alternate uses. Most are just ridiculous but with every item there have been at least 2-3 ideas that were very good for alternate uses. Really helps in looking at common ordinary objects in a different light.

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  • CountryGuy
    Valued Member

  • CountryGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by dalewick View Post

    Tyvek is great! If you can sew it makes all sorts of great gear. Aren't frog togs made of Tyvek? I've even seen back packs made from the stuff.

    Dale
    You know I don't know... But the pack could be a great idea. You could probably sew up lots of things with a heavy thread or heavy test fishing line then wipe the seams with some silicon caulk and wala waterproof. Does give ideas like packs, ponchos, shelters, flys etc... I wonder if when washing if it'd take a dye... hmmm might have to see if I can find a house build and scrounge or check out the lumber yards for some remnants. I think a lot of places use it or a similar for lumber covers now also.

    Leave a comment:

  • Morgan101
    Valued Member

  • Morgan101
    replied
    Think like a kid. Didn't we all build forts when we were kids? Seems like we were always out in the desert (Southern Arizona) digging a fort and scrounging whatever material we could find. When you finished the fort became a clubhouse where we could hang out. Brings back some wonderful memories.

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  • dalewick
    Valued Member

  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by CountryGuy View Post
    Something we used to use years ago was a piece of tyvek house wrap. like scraps from house construction. We'd wash it first to make it soft and not all stiff and crinkly. After washing it reminded me of how FrogToggs are.
    Tyvek is great! If you can sew it makes all sorts of great gear. Aren't frog togs made of Tyvek? I've even seen back packs made from the stuff.

    Dale

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  • CountryGuy
    Valued Member

  • CountryGuy
    replied
    Something we used to use years ago was a piece of tyvek house wrap. like scraps from house construction. We'd wash it first to make it soft and not all stiff and crinkly. After washing it reminded me of how FrogToggs are.

    Leave a comment:

  • Mangler
    Valued Member

  • Mangler
    replied
    I am finding photos fail to upload when they exceed the file size limitation. Resize the file size before uploading.

    ON WINDOWS: Right click the image file, choose EDIT. Click on IMAGE; RESIZE. Click on the radio button PIXELS and enter 300 for Horizontal size. The image will resize proportionally. Save the file and exit.

    ON MACINTOSH: Right click the image file and click OPEN. Click on TOOLS| ADJUST SIZE. Enter 300 for width. Click on OK. Click on FILE|SAVE and exit.

    Now the file size will be within the limits allowed on the Forum.

    Good luck.

    Leave a comment:

  • ColoradoMike
    Valued Member

  • ColoradoMike
    replied
    If you want an inexpensive survival blanket.....spend the 6.50 or so to get you a SOL survival blanket......they really work. !100% more effective than the cheap space blankets. Check them out.. a BOB must have. Tried to post a pic......failed.

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  • stairman
    Valued Member

  • stairman
    replied
    Absolutely! The ideal shelter location, if you want to be seen, is just inside the canopy on the edge of a clearing with a southern exposure. You can put out signals in the clearing while having the treeline to shelter in .

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  • RICHFL
    Valued Member

  • RICHFL
    replied
    One thing to remember do you want to be found or not? You should practice both methods.

    If NO: Use available cover for shelter (Blown over tree, tree branches), look for hidden areas like draws and thickets to stay in.

    If YES: Use a space blanket as a lean to cover shiny side out. Stay in the open as much as possible to be spotted from the air.

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  • stairman
    Valued Member

  • stairman
    replied
    Great post. A tarp and some rope usually works out ok, sometimes with a hammock, however IMO hammocks are better for warm weather sleeping. Then you have the mosquitos and tarps dont prevent these from attack. Hard to have a hammock and tent so a mosquito bar that hangs over and touches the ground is useful, or just sleep in your tent. A mist bottle and towel make hot sleeping more bareable. As for primitive shelters, the ones mentioned are the norm with the lean to being the simplest to construct. A double lean to is awesome with a space at the 2 ridges for smoke to escape, and fire within, closing in the side walls but for a small crawl in door the whole shelter reflects heat all around and makes it cozy. Lots of space too for firewood, gear and other campers. In the absense of fire, leaves and moss stuffed in clothes and piled on top of a debris hut being only big enough to lay down in and prop yourself up on your elbows, becomes wilderness insulation and with enough of it, one can remain warm. The squirrels do it. A trashbag stuffed with leaves make a good door plug to hold in the warmth.

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  • JLBIII
    Valued Member

  • JLBIII
    replied
    I've used lean-to's on several occasions over the years and have found these to be the most comfortable. They are easy to make and depending on your needs as basic or sophisticated as you want them.

    Joe

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  • survivalguy
    Valued Member

  • survivalguy
    replied
    space blankets are great shelter material and are very lightweight and take up no space at all in your pack only downside is once unfolded you'll never fold it up again so use it for tinder ..burns great. :)

    Leave a comment:

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