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How do you choose/scope out a camp ground?

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  • #16
    I frequent the 'Landslide Blog' over at... https://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/

    Current article is 'Landslides and road damage from am atmospheric river event in British Columbia'. Infrastructure has taken a big hit, may take a while to stabilise before geo-technic 'remediation' can begin.

    If you're in 'dry land' area, previous article is on big dust-storms in Iran spawned by a #6.3 shaking down cliffs...

    ( Sadly, seems epicentre was too far from coast to send a tsunami through IRG's naval facilities...)

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Nik View Post
      I frequent the 'Landslide Blog' over at... https://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/

      Current article is 'Landslides and road damage from am atmospheric river event in British Columbia'. Infrastructure has taken a big hit, may take a while to stabilise before geo-technic 'remediation' can begin.

      If you're in 'dry land' area, previous article is on big dust-storms in Iran spawned by a #6.3 shaking down cliffs...

      ( Sadly, seems epicentre was too far from coast to send a tsunami through IRG's naval facilities...)
      Interstate 40W of Asheville, NC has had a few mud slides closing I-40 a few times. Local people advise travelers to ignore their GPS and follow the detour signs because there isn't a signal in the deep valleys.

      Often catastrophic events can be a good thing.. LOL






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      • #18
        I 've camped for over 50 years now. Most camp sites have a web site. Good information including camping sites, restrictions, attractions, and photos. Most state / federal parks give a lot of information. Start with spring/fall campng. Weather is cooler so equipment is cheaper. Once you have experience in camping then move to more primitive sites.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by RICHFL View Post
          I 've camped for over 50 years now. Most camp sites have a web site. Good information including camping sites, restrictions, attractions, and photos. Most state / federal parks give a lot of information. Start with spring/fall campng. Weather is cooler so equipment is cheaper. Once you have experience in camping then move to more primitive sites.
          We started camping with a tent, then a popup and finally a 29'-6" tail wagger. Although no fault of the campgrounds we had a few unpleasant experiences. The worst was a drunken couple screaming at each other. By the time camp ground security woke up and silenced them; we were wide awake.

          To see the Brown Mountain lights, we primitive camped.
          http://brownmountainlights.com
          I don't know if primitive camping is still allowed, but if it is; the lights are something to see.

          The first couple of times, we didn't see anything that we couldn't explain; then, we did.
          Search for Brown Mountain Lights and click images..

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