Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

primitive fire starting methods.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Stitch
    replied
    The hand drill always kicks my butt. I have gotten a wisp of smoke, but never an ember.

    http://www.primitiveways.com/pt-fire.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Iron mike
    replied
    I have used the fire thong and bow drill flint and Steel methods all with success how ever I cant start a fire with a magnifying glass to save my life it is a horrible thing to watch my trying to do it would try the patients of a special needs teacher

    Leave a comment:


  • PT945
    replied
    Originally posted by J40SW View Post
    I never thought to use a thong, but then again I have never worn a thong either...
    You don't know what your missing, you try it.

    Leave a comment:


  • J40SW
    replied
    Originally posted by PT945 View Post
    The methods i know of are bow drill, hand drill, fire plow , and fire thong .
    I never thought to use a thong, but then again I have never worn a thong either...

    Leave a comment:


  • bcauz3y
    replied
    Originally posted by PT945 View Post
    Don't feel bad, I haven't yet had a successful fire with the bow drill.
    About 8-10 minutes.

    Leave a comment:


  • PT945
    replied
    Originally posted by slowz1k View Post
    I'm curious... What's the best time anyone has had getting flame (not ember or smoke) from a bow drill. I know there are more variables than one could count affecting the outcome (humidity, location, tinder, drill materials, etc...)
    From the first twist of the spindle to an actual flaming tinder pile what's your best time? average time?

    I've never done it so count me out.:mad:
    Don't feel bad, I haven't yet had a successful fire with the bow drill.

    Leave a comment:


  • slowz1k
    replied
    I'm curious... What's the best time anyone has had getting flame (not ember or smoke) from a bow drill. I know there are more variables than one could count affecting the outcome (humidity, location, tinder, drill materials, etc...)
    From the first twist of the spindle to an actual flaming tinder pile what's your best time? average time?

    I've never done it so count me out.:mad:

    Leave a comment:


  • Stitch
    replied
    The most effective combination I have found in my area is a Yucca spindle and a Cottonwood hearth. A lot of the books and videos out there show putting your tinder bundle underneath the hearth. In my experience this causes my tinder bundle to either compress or self destruct. Cody Lundin taught us in Aboriginal Living Skills to use a leaf, piece of bark, etc. underneath the notch. Once you have a good coal going tap the hearth with the spindle to free the coal. Then transfer the coal to your tinder bundle. I have had better luck with a straighter as opposed to curved bow. Dry Cottonwood cambium of dry Juniper bark make good tinder bundles.

    Leave a comment:


  • PT945
    replied
    Originally posted by Snow Walker View Post
    This last fall I played with an idea of using 2 corncobs tied together for a fire board along with a cedar drill and it worked great.

    Give it a try!
    What a unique idea for a fire board. Thanks for the tip.

    Leave a comment:


  • PT945
    replied
    Originally posted by Oatmealer View Post
    For the fire bow drill You don't really need a "curved" stick for a bow, it just makes it a bit easier if you have not had a lot of practice. Dry mullein makes a great "drill" very soft and it turns to ash very quickly. Hardwood can be used for the "hand hold" but you may notice it will squeak loudly once the wood starts to heat up. Take your finger and wipe the oil from the side of your nose and apply it to where it meets the drill, it will quiet it long enough. Bone or a stone, with a carved divit works best in my opinion. Primitive fire starting is one of my favorite subjects. I have not started a fire with a match or a lighter in several years. It's just the common way to do it for me.
    Maybe you can post a few pictures of your bow drill in action.I haven't yet perfected the method and any help is appreciated.

    Leave a comment:


  • Echo2
    replied
    Originally posted by Snow Walker View Post
    This last fall I played with an idea of using 2 corncobs tied together for a fire board along with a cedar drill and it worked great.

    Give it a try!
    very slick...I like it...:)

    Leave a comment:


  • Snow Walker
    replied
    Corn Cobs

    This last fall I played with an idea of using 2 corncobs tied together for a fire board along with a cedar drill and it worked great.

    Give it a try!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jamman
    replied
    use shavings of birch or pine, and willow to make the bow. hard wood on the spindle oak works well. and softer wood for the drill and wood base. pine also works really well for those.
    and a good piece of flint and a rock work extremely well with straw and birch shavings.

    Leave a comment:


  • Oatmealer
    replied
    For the fire bow drill You don't really need a "curved" stick for a bow, it just makes it a bit easier if you have not had a lot of practice. Dry mullein makes a great "drill" very soft and it turns to ash very quickly. Hardwood can be used for the "hand hold" but you may notice it will squeak loudly once the wood starts to heat up. Take your finger and wipe the oil from the side of your nose and apply it to where it meets the drill, it will quiet it long enough. Bone or a stone, with a carved divit works best in my opinion. Primitive fire starting is one of my favorite subjects. I have not started a fire with a match or a lighter in several years. It's just the common way to do it for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Oatmealer
    replied
    Dryer lint catches a spark like crazy. Followed up with some birch bark and it's a no-fail. Birch bark will light even when wet due to the oils it contains.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X