shelter, clothing and sleeping bags cannot GENERATE heat. They can only help to conserve the heat that YOU generate. In order to generate heat, you have to EAT. The Alone contestants have all frozen inside of their sleeping bags and shelters because they were STARVING. A fire DOES generate heat, but most of it is wasted cause it's not aimed at YOU. By putting head sized hot rocks in the fire for half an hour, then putting said rocks in pits under your debris-stuffed pole-box, surrounding the rocks with wood ashes, means all of the rocks' heat is TRAPPED in the sealed, insulated shelter with you. By having the rocks IN the flames, they get a lot more of the heat than you would standing next to the flames and you'd have to be out in the cold wind to get even that much heat.

Fire inside of a debris-hut is an invitation to disaster, as Amos, Nikki (twice) Mark, Nathan and probably others have found out (but never admitted to it). With a stone fire place, or even dumber, a stone 'cabin" they've all admitted to having ice right next to their fire. So their shelters SUCKED, man. If you need fire inside of your shelter, at temps above -20F, it's cause your shelter/sleep gear /clothing suck. Which means you dont know what you're doing. None of them have even had brains enough to build wind breaks around their shelters/fires, when doing so only takes one day. and doesn't have to be done until snow is imminent. Snow can be insulation and a wind-break, too, if you get enough of it.

I've had dummies try to claim that you cant add water to dry snow to make it "pack". They've never even made a snow-ball apparently! The fire can't burn unless you've got ventilation holes and your heat all leaks out of those holes. So the fire inside of the shelter is an overall loss of calories. You have to go find, cut, haul and process that wood down to a size that lets you use it in your fire place. A siberian log fire needs no cutting or splitting of wood, other than to a size that you can drag it to your shelter. Since you''ll only need the fire for cooking fish and boiling your drinking water, you'll need very little firewood.

Use the ashes to snuff the alternative Swedish torch as soon as the Siberian is burning well and use the ashes to snuff the Siberian when you're done with it. put the Swede in the protection of your shelter. The Siberian forms its own protection from rain/snow, if you'll trench around it and have wind breaks around it. The charred ends ignite easily from the Swede's intense flames, even if they do get wet. So you can use both fire lays many times before you have to make more. Dont waste wood and calories by having the fire burn any more than you need it to at the moment. Bury some coals and charcoal in the ashes and the fire will remain "re-ignitable" for 12+ hours. You'll be using it to cook and boil water every 7-8 hours anyway.