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it's very amusing to me to see "experts"

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Dorobuta View Post
    Really? based on your posts and ideas, I personally find this very difficult to believe. Especially since you're a convicted felon, and firearms are off the table for you, legally.
    Registror must be well funded to be at the range and out hunting on his off days whatever those might be.

    That being said too many felons have firearms and use them to commit crimes..







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    • #47
      Originally posted by Tugaloo View Post

      Registror must be well funded to be at the range and out hunting on his off days whatever those might be.

      That being said too many felons have firearms and use them to commit crimes..






      He habitually uses either a wife or girlfriend of his as a straw woman instead of a straw man to obtain firearms that are "hers".
      That and rudimentary machine shop skills to finish out 80% receivers or pistol frames.

      Give him time and eventually he'll either be back at club Fed or the looney bin wing of it.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by BigEd63 View Post

        He habitually uses either a wife or girlfriend of his as a straw woman instead of a straw man to obtain firearms that are "hers".
        That and rudimentary machine shop skills to finish out 80% receivers or pistol frames.

        Give him time and eventually he'll either be back at club Fed or the looney bin wing of it.
        Judging by the local newspaper and reality TV shows, LE is always willing to add a weapons charge to convicted felons arrested for anything else.
        Finishing an 80% with a hand drill and a Dremel ought to be a sight to see..

        IMO, he is a bag of wind filled with bad advice. It takes all kinds and he is in the wrong kind column.

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        • #49
          Tugaloo....

          this here...


          The firearm froze up because "they" were clueless that one lubricant does not work at every temperature.
          You got me to remembering something I read about the experiences of a German Ace operating in Russia during WW2...and flying an ME 109 fighter airplane.
          His name was Eric Hartman and he holds the record for aircraft shot down to this day...352.


          Now what I found of interest is that they solved their problems with the Machine guns in their aircraft from a captured Russian Mechanic...as to how the Russians could get their aircraft in the air and machine guns working when the Germans were often grounded in the winter.

          The mechanic showed them that to keep the guns working ...they just cleaned them and removed the grease....lubricant...and then next sortie repeated the process.

          This mechanic also showed them to put a drain pan of fuel under the plane and ignite it for pre heat...in getting the engines started in the bitter cold winters.

          But I found it very interesting that in the biting bitter cold the solution was to clean and remove the grease/lubricants...


          Orangetom
          Not an Ishmaelite.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by orangetom1999 View Post
            Tugaloo....

            this here...

            You got me to remembering something I read about the experiences of a German Ace operating in Russia during WW2...and flying an ME 109 fighter airplane.
            His name was Eric Hartman and he holds the record for aircraft shot down to this day...352.

            Now what I found of interest is that they solved their problems with the Machine guns in their aircraft from a captured Russian Mechanic...as to how the Russians could get their aircraft in the air and machine guns working when the Germans were often grounded in the winter.

            The mechanic showed them that to keep the guns working ...they just cleaned them and removed the grease....lubricant...and then next sortie repeated the process.

            This mechanic also showed them to put a drain pan of fuel under the plane and ignite it for pre heat...in getting the engines started in the bitter cold winters.

            But I found it very interesting that in the biting bitter cold the solution was to clean and remove the grease/lubricants...


            Orangetom
            Not an Ishmaelite.
            It would depend on the type of grease they were using. Potentially, how much they used.

            Even as late as the late 1970s, the science of tribology didn't exist. They'd select a mechanical engineer to be the lubrication engineer. My last and second to last employers employed engineers who studied tribology.
            From Wikipedia:
            Tribology is the science and engineering of interacting surfaces in relative motion. It includes the study and application of the principles of friction, lubrication, and wear. Tribology is highly interdisciplinary, drawing on many academic fields, including physics, chemistry, materials science, mathematics, biology, and engineering.
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tribology

            I don't know much more except in today's engineering, tribology is not pick an engineer from a "hat"
            In all fairness to the engineers who were arbitrarily chosen or just guessed. They invented hydrodynamic lubrication of engines where a shaft "floats" on a film of oil between steel journal and a bushing. Some examples are a camshaft, crankshaft etc.

            The Nazis may have used a grease that solidified at sub zero temperatures.

            I've read field reports where gear oil in the differentials would solidify in northern Canada causing the gears to fail in a mile or so from the truck yard.. As it was 30 years ago, I'm not sure what weight gear oil.

            I rebuilt my 12 year old Davis weather station. I replaced a small solar panel, a battery, tipping spoon (measures rainfall) and wind vane.
            n today's throw away world, they make replacement parts and even offer updated designs that fit exactly. Rather refreshing. ;)

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            • #51
              Certain Items I will throw away....others I keep and try to maintain them running or keep a spare in storage...

              Got that from my Father.

              Agree about the lubricants. Many we use in this shipyard are industrial in nature....not what one gets at Wal Mart..or even the auto parts store.

              Often they have the temperature limits posted on the package..so one needs read carefully.

              But I am aware that there are better lubricants available than was the case 30 or 40 years ago...better machine designs as well as seal technology. When I came up you did not see many cars going 200,000 miles. It is rather common today. I suspect better lubricants and seal design/technology has helped.

              Orangetom
              Not an Ishmaelite.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by orangetom1999 View Post
                Certain Items I will throw away....others I keep and try to maintain them running or keep a spare in storage...

                Got that from my Father.

                Agree about the lubricants. Many we use in this shipyard are industrial in nature....not what one gets at Wal Mart..or even the auto parts store.

                Often they have the temperature limits posted on the package..so one needs read carefully.

                But I am aware that there are better lubricants available than was the case 30 or 40 years ago...better machine designs as well as seal technology. When I came up you did not see many cars going 200,000 miles. It is rather common today. I suspect better lubricants and seal design/technology has helped.

                Orangetom
                Not an Ishmaelite.
                Same here and downsizing has added to the throwaways. Our last home was ~2 times as big as where we are now. So yes, we have done some major divesting.

                Some things are worth maintaining. One of my examples is a Grundig AM/FM/SW radio that I bought at a yard sale. The 1950s paper capacitors are shot with no replacements. To me even though the radio has seen hard times; it is worth replacing them with modern ones to enjoy it.

                If you wandered back decades in the shipyard's files; you would notice a serious change in lubricants. One company I was employed by offered two warranties; if the user used dino (fossil) oil it was 250K and synthetic oil was 500K.
                OTOH for many applications, both cold and warm weather lubricants are offered.

                As you said lubricants and seal technology have greatly improved and so has machining capabilities. Which is the reason why so many rifles are sub MOA accurate with quality ammunition.


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                • #53
                  Wow Tugaloo.....you got me to going down memory lane...here..

                  Some things are worth maintaining. One of my examples is a Grundig AM/FM/SW radio that I bought at a yard sale. The 1950s paper capacitors are shot with no replacements. To me even though the radio has seen hard times; it is worth replacing them with modern ones to enjoy it.
                  We grew up listening to my mothers olde vacuum Tube Grundig AM/FM short wave radio and if I recall it was very close to this model here..

                  Grundig 5040W 3d | Antica Radio

                  I remember it because of the green tuning light next to the large left side knob.

                  We would spend time listening to the Lone Ranger in the place we lived outside of Paris, France for 4 years.

                  I still have it up in my garage but agree...at that age many of the capacitors are shot.


                  Wow!! Thanks for the trip down memory lane..

                  Orangetom
                  Not an Ishmaelite.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by orangetom1999 View Post
                    Wow Tugaloo.....you got me to going down memory lane...here..



                    We grew up listening to my mothers olde vacuum Tube Grundig AM/FM short wave radio and if I recall it was very close to this model here..

                    Grundig 5040W 3d | Antica Radio

                    I remember it because of the green tuning light next to the large left side knob.

                    We would spend time listening to the Lone Ranger in the place we lived outside of Paris, France for 4 years.

                    I still have it up in my garage but agree...at that age many of the capacitors are shot.


                    Wow!! Thanks for the trip down memory lane..

                    Orangetom
                    Not an Ishmaelite.
                    We are made of our memories.
                    Living in Pars must have some wonderful memories.

                    Grundig made so many high quality radios. As they are all kind of similar; it is difficult to identify which one you remember or which one you own, LOL!
                    I have two Grundig Satellite 800s I picked up for peanuts. Same as all German made Grundig radios, the audio is fantastic.

                    My Grundig has the same tuning light. It has seen hard times. In spots, the veneer is peeling. OTOH, You can buy replacement capacitors; they are exact replacements and more importantly, they will bring it back to life without the hum.
                    IMO, it is easiest to use the shotgun technique or replace all of them to save the S&H charges.

                    I have one of these, I'm going to restore:
                    http://vintageelectronics.betamaxcol...model2325.html
                    The problem are those beautiful blue backlighting lights. There aren't any direct replacements; LEDs can be used by building adaptors to supply the LEDs the correct voltage.
                    Originally it was advertised at 125 watts RMS per channel; however, almost all can be peaked over 150 watts RMS per channel.

                    So many things to do. :D


                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Wow....Marantz....that was the one to have back in the day....Thanks again for the trip down memory lane...

                      Just got home from work...going to raid the fridge...and check my mail..


                      Thanks ,

                      Orangetom


                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by orangetom1999 View Post
                        Wow....Marantz....that was the one to have back in the day....Thanks again for the trip down memory lane...

                        Just got home from work...going to raid the fridge...and check my mail..


                        Thanks ,

                        Orangetom


                        I was an audiophile and for that matter, I still am.
                        Same as everyone who was stationed in Vietnam, we were introduced to component stereo systems. Back in the "world," most people had a system that had AM/FM, a turntable and 2 speakers.

                        We had 2 rib pork chops..

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