Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

pine sap

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • pine sap

    Hey we all know that pine sap is good for fire starter, I'm a trapper and I came across some pines that a beaver had chewed on so I took some of the sap well a lot of it I put it in a zip lock bag. my question is will this sap last for a while or is there a time limit on how lone you can keep it. just want to know thanks. shotgunpapa.
    : https://www.facebook.com/groups/Georgiahangs/

  • #2
    I think it will last a long time. (Years)

    Comment


    • #3
      Sap still comes out of boards cut before the Revolutionary war and works fine. In a few million years you'll have amber. :)


      Dale
      Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

      Comment


      • #4
        I believe it is to be good as an antibacterial in a pinch. Similar to triple antibiotic. Think a bunch of other uses like glue and I'm sure many others.
        I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

        Comment


        • #5
          thanks I hate that the tree got ate but I wanted to put it to good use again thanks for the info.
          : https://www.facebook.com/groups/Georgiahangs/

          Comment


          • #6
            Pine sap has anti bacterial properties and when mixed with ash makes a epoxy like glue (Native Americans used it for fletching) as well as a good fire starter when dried.

            Comment


            • #7
              pine sap has lots of uses besides fire starter ,good for wounds melt it on cuts ,use for glue and water sealer always keep a little in pack and saddle bags

              Comment


              • #8
                Just curious, was the pine sap you collected in the crystallized form or still sort of liquid? My granddad would have us kids collect it a couple of times a year and warned us to stay away from the non crystalized for fear of wrath of our mothers. Getting it off of kids and out of their clothes was a pain.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ZAGran View Post
                  Just curious, was the pine sap you collected in the crystallized form or still sort of liquid? My granddad would have us kids collect it a couple of times a year and warned us to stay away from the non crystalized for fear of wrath of our mothers. Getting it off of kids and out of their clothes was a pain.
                  Some years ago, I got into a fight with a pine tree and ended up with a mess of pine sap in my long hair. Peanut butter took it right out!

                  That fight involved an embarrassing story of me trying to overcome a stooopid fear of heights, but I was determined to overcome it so I could bow hunt from a tree stand instead of on the ground. After I got situated, the wind started to blow like hell and the tall pine tree began to sway crazily...with me in it. I was afraid of being blown out of the tree! Even squirrels dared not move... I bear-hugged the tree for a good while before the wind finally died down. By the time I inched my way down from the tree in my Amacker climbing tree stand, I was covered with sticky sap and bits of pine bark. Peanut butter got it off my hands, clothes and hair like magic.
                  Last edited by GrizzlyetteAdams; 10-01-2018, 07:55 AM.
                  Genius is making a way out of no way.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GrizzlyetteAdams View Post

                    Some years ago, I got into a fight with a pine tree and ended up with a mess of pine sap in my long hair. Peanut butter took it right out!

                    That fight involved an embarrassing story of me trying to overcome a stooopid fear of heights, but I was determined to overcome it so I could bow hunt from a tree stand instead of on the ground. After I got situated, the wind started to blow like hell and the tall pine tree began to sway crazily...with me in it. I was afraid of being blown out of the tree! Even squirrels dared not move... I bear-hugged the tree for a good while before the wind finally died down. By the time I inched my way down from the tree in my Amacker climbing tree stand, I was covered with sticky sap and bits of pine bark. Peanut butter got it off my hands, clothes and hair like magic.
                    My guess is........that it is the (Peanut Butter) oil that released the pine sap. I use WD-40 for releasing sticky stuff for the same reason. That hand cleaner that is used by many mechanics, that has a lanolin primary ingredient is also great releasing agent. I wonder if maybe "Any" light or thin oil probably works well.
                    One day you eat the chicken.....next day the left-over chicken.....next five days you eat chicken feathers, head and feet.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Sourdough View Post

                      My guess is........that it is the (Peanut Butter) oil that released the pine sap. I use WD-40 for releasing sticky stuff for the same reason. That hand cleaner that is used by many mechanics, that has a lanolin primary ingredient is also great releasing agent. I wonder if maybe "Any" light or thin oil probably works well.
                      Google-fu says YES it will. Good to know because mineral oil and cooking oils are cheaper to use than peanut butter. Come to think of it, I have used cooking oil to release stuff (like my foot, or a harmless snake) from sticky glue traps.

                      Genius is making a way out of no way.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This is a good thing to know. And to think we cut down 28 pine trees in our yard because of daughter's allergies to them.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Pine resin melted and powdered charcoal added to the resin in a 50/50 mixture makes an excellent adhesive/glue with examples of it being used being found by archeologist and dated to 1000's of years old.

                          Dale
                          Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Nature's super glue, dat!
                            Genius is making a way out of no way.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Our neighbors still have pine trees so I will have to get some sap and try this out.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X