Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What are your actual skill sets?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    I know how to
    1. cook
    2. garden
    3.can
    4. hunt and gut and cut up deer, rabbits, goats. cows, pigs birds
    5.sew quilts, clothes
    6. spin yarn, dye yarn
    7. knit
    8. crochet
    9. some basic woodwork
    10. basic electrical stuff
    11.soap making
    12. candle making
    13. fish


    My husband can
    1. hunt.
    2. fish
    3. meat cut
    4. smoke things
    5. weld
    6. some car and tractor repair
    7. build things


    Might have to add to these lists later

    Comment


    • #47
      I like to have a large skill set. One thing i have not heard mentioned is making your own shoes. This is something i have been learning more about recently. This once was a a very prominent profession and now there are only a few with this skill set. If you are interested here is a site on how to make your own custom made shoes. healthyhandmadeshoes.com

      Comment


      • #48
        Making shoes is a good. I'll have to check that site out.

        Comment


        • #49
          I tell jokes. however, I only know five and only two of those are funny.

          - Buggy
          I'm not a fatalist. I'm a realist.

          Comment


          • #50
            Ummmm about those 2 "funny" ones big guy.........

            We didn't want to hurt your feelings but...............................

            :p
            "Oh, America. I wish I could tell you that this was still America, but I've come to realize that you can't have a country without people. And there are no people here. No, my friends. This is now the United States of Zombieland"

            "The constitution does not guarantee our safety, only our liberty!" Robert Steed before congress 3/2013

            Skills Beats Stuff

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by myakka62 View Post
              Ummmm about those 2 "funny" ones big guy.........

              We didn't want to hurt your feelings but...............................

              :p
              What he said. Sorry bout that. LOL.

              Dale
              Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by johnnie l. View Post
                Because I am very lazy my best skill is figuring out how to do things Easier!
                I have always said, laziness is the mother of invention.

                Will
                CITIZEN by BIRTH
                AMERICAN by CHOICE
                NRA PATRON MEMBER by NECESSITY

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by wac220 View Post
                  I have always said, laziness is the mother of invention.

                  Will
                  And you're correct...in a way.

                  I spent a significant portion of my working life as an engineer and I've often said that being lazy is what made me a good engineer.

                  When a solution is complex, expensive, time consuming or labor intensive, it's rarely the best solution and it usually means that you have yet to ask the correct question.

                  The "best" solution" is almost always simple and elegant. What I mean by "lazy", is thinking more and doing less...ie, working smarter, not harder.

                  More to the point regarding survival is that the conservation of time, resources and effort are all important in survival and self sufficiency.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Sharing the Skills and learning. Enjoying every available opportunity to make a fool out of myself having fun with all of the skills. It seems to dispell the tension for other folks and accelerates the learning curve for all involved.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Class 8 truck operation (been around them all my life & 20+ yrs behind the wheel on & offroad & adverse weather & mountains)
                      Auto/Truck repair (former auto tech & still have valid credentials)
                      HVAC (licensed & certified)
                      Basic Electrical
                      Building Trades
                      Construction Equip operation
                      Tree service
                      Basic gunsmithing
                      Primitive Camper
                      11 yrs martial arts experience
                      Hunting
                      Fishing
                      Experienced swimmer & tread for long periods of time
                      Former motocross racer
                      Experienced ATV rider
                      Trailing & mudding, winching, etc of offroad vehicles
                      Mig, Arc, Spot weld & braze
                      Metal fabrication
                      Sewing
                      I have a few other skills, I think this good enough for now. I've been on my own since I was 17 & learned to take care of me & picked up other things along the way.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        I am thinking post TEOTWAWKI now. We will start a school. Have all the materials and experience to teach K thru 12.

                        We will revert back to the old one room school house.
                        The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

                        Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          I was talking to a friend a couple days ago and it reminded me of this post. The discussion was skill sets and muscle memory and do all skill sets require practice and repetition to be retainable. His opinion was that all skill sets require enough practice that muscle memory is set. I don't believe that's true. Some skill sets like hunting require that associated skill sets like shooting (either a gun or bow) be practiced to maintain a level of proficiency, but other skill sets, (like casting metal), only require the retention of knowledge to remain viable. I also argued that some skill sets need no muscle memory to retain in the first place (such as producing improvised explosives) and can be viable a persons entire lifetime as long as the knowledge is retained and your ability to physically function is present.. I agreed with him that many skill sets from such areas as the military need muscle memory to be retained and viable at the reaction speeds they require, but an equal number (if not more) of civilian skill sets need no muscle memory.

                          Am I looking at this wrong? Thoughts?

                          Dale
                          Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Dalewick: I think I would be leaning toward your side. The statement by itself is an absolute: "all skill sets require practice and repetition to be retainable" and I don't think that is true. There are many things that we retain without practice. Riding a bicycle is the first one that comes to mind. Others have to be repeated constantly or they are forgotten. Personally, this is where I would put computer skills. To me they are "use-it-or-lose-it" skills. If I don't do something frequently I forget. I would include tying knots in this category. I do think it is beneficial to practice occasionally. Your body will revert to what it is trained to do, especially, in a stressful situation. I guess I would say it depends on the complexity of the skill. Some require constant repetition, and some don't.
                            The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

                            Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Professional Skills:
                              Electrical Engineer by education. Have spent 25 years as an industrial process engineer.
                              Computer geek (Build, repair, some programming) Fluent with Photoshop, Autocad, Excel, Access, etc)
                              Mig Welding, Tig, Brazing, Soldering
                              Machining (vertical mill, lathe, grinder, etc)
                              Robotics and automation
                              Carpentry and Roofing
                              Plumbing and Pipe Fitting on a residential or industrial scale.
                              Electrical work on residential or industrial scale
                              Familiar with almost all flame heating burner/ignition systems.
                              Marksmanship award in US Military service.
                              Some industrial chemistry
                              Concrete work.
                              Hydraulics
                              Filtration, reverse osmosis systems, DI systems, Ultra-Filter systems.
                              Heavy equipment operator (Backhoe, loader, fork lifts, etc)
                              Rebuild of almost any kind of pump (centrifugal, rotary vane, diaphragm, gear, piston, etc)

                              Homesteading Skills:
                              Successful gardener
                              Raised pigs, butchered, smoked and processed all meat.
                              Skilled hunter (bow and firearm)
                              Basic and Advanced first aid.
                              Water Bath as well as Pressure Canning
                              Dehydrating
                              Renewable energy
                              Hardwood flooring install
                              Any kind of wood working

                              I've learned how to make biodiesel, ethanol, beer, wine, whisky as well as wood gas.. currently working on pulling petroleum oils from plastics.

                              The biodiesel knowledge also taught me how to make soap from scratch... (although I do require a large dead animal for that or at least some vegetable oil)

                              Hobbies:
                              Astrophysics - just can't get enough.
                              Quantum Physics
                              Learning what kind of cool things can be done with common and easily found chemicals such as home products, pool maintenance stuff, or things found at a hardware store. I make my own cleaners, etchers, explosives, incendiaries, smoke bombs and even solid fuel rocket motors.

                              Future projects:
                              Learn to tan a hide and basic leather working skills.
                              Learn how to make cheese
                              Learn how to make sausage.. I've done it before but it never comes out right.

                              I also wanted to learn how to grow poppy plants and make my own opioids. I'm not a drug user, not even a drinker, but being able to make opioids in a long term SHTF situation would go a long way and be very valuable.

                              I also wanted to learn how to make insulin even though I'm not diabetic.








                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by dalewick View Post
                                The discussion was skill sets and muscle memory and do all skill sets require practice and repetition to be retainable. His opinion was that all skill sets require enough practice that muscle memory is set. I don't believe that's true. Some skill sets like hunting require that associated skill sets like shooting (either a gun or bow) be practiced to maintain a level of proficiency, but other skill sets, (like casting metal), only require the retention of knowledge to remain viable. I also argued that some skill sets need no muscle memory to retain in the first place (such as producing improvised explosives) and can be viable a persons entire lifetime as long as the knowledge is retained and your ability to physically function is present..

                                Am I looking at this wrong? Thoughts?

                                Dale
                                Not wrong, but differently.

                                I agree it takes muscle memory.. but remember,although the brain is not a muscle but it behaves as a muscle. The more you work it, the more you can actually do things oin 'autopilot', aka 'muscle memory'.

                                Part of the reason I respond to questions and take the time to answer them is to retain the muscle memory in my brain so I do not forget the skills that are often like breathing to me.

                                Cedar

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X