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  • What are your actual skill sets?

    How many actually know what their skill sets are?
    How many practice what they think their skill sets are?

    I'll start the ball rolling in hopes others join in. Just list them in three words or less for each. List 20, If you can't list 20, It would be a good idea to start studying until you can.
    1. Welding
    2. Forging
    3. Blacksmithing
    4. Canning
    5. Gun Smithing
    6. Metal drawing (wire etc)
    7. Reloading
    8. Basic Chemistry
    9. Metal ore smelting
    10. Hydrolics
    11. Electronics
    12. Mechanic
    13. Leather Smith
    14. Tanning
    15. Machining
    16. Hunting
    17. Fishing
    18. Building trades
    19. Injection molding
    20. plumbing
    21. Basic electrical
    Last edited by cwi555; 11-22-2009, 01:34 AM. Reason: error fixing

  • #2
    Wow, you have some great skills. I would sure love to be your neighbor to borrow some tools. A couple of months back I can remember we had a similar post. It is probobily a good idea to up date our skills. On your list you have #3&#10 as the same thing. What new skill are you going to study?

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    • #3
      So I did. Will have to fix that. 20 is the short list.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Centurion View Post
        Wow, you have some great skills. I would sure love to be your neighbor to borrow some tools. A couple of months back I can remember we had a similar post. It is probobily a good idea to up date our skills. On your list you have #3
        as the same thing. What new skill are you going to study?
        I am working on two actually. Currently working on drawing brass cases, and stamping primer cups/anvils.

        It's turned out to be more of a challenge than expected.
        I am using ASTM B19 - 05 Standard Specification for Cartridge Brass Sheet, Strip, Plate, Bar, and Disks
        and;
        ASTM B129-07 Standard Specification for Cartridge Brass Cartridge Case Cups.

        I am making the Bars for stamping by B19, and B129 for the drawing.
        I made some brass (70 percent copper, .07 lead, .02 iron, and remainder Zinc). No problem so far. I have converted a wood splitter hydrolic ram to serve as the stamping machine, so no problem making the cups.

        The problem I am running into is my machinery seems a bit slow and it's giving me some enlongated grains, and over sized grain structure in the side walls of the final product. If you have ever had a case that split on the axis of the case (I.E. along the length of the case) It's most likely cause is what I am describing.
        I've tried heating them, but still getting back to the same problem.
        The grain size requirements for .30 to .45 caliber for the sidewall is .045mm min, and .120mm max. Thats huge as far as metal grains go, but I am getting around .135mm between the primer cup and the shoulder. Mostly towards the shoulder.

        I think I just need to break down and buy one round of equipment so that I can copy it.

        I've got the powder, primer material, and bullet down. The last piece of the puzzle is the brass cartridge, and it's proving to be a pain in the arse.

        Edit:

        Though maybe I just needed to type that out. I believe I just figured out the problem. The lead is in trace to stabilize the zinc into the correct phase during solidification (face center cubic), but it may be cooking out. I've been putting it in early, I might can get it to stabilize better if i drop it in last.
        Will update when I get it done.
        Last edited by cwi555; 11-22-2009, 02:10 AM.

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        • #5
          Skills list...

          1. Brain-Tanning
          2. Leather working
          3. Hunting
          4. Sewing
          5. Auto Mechanic
          6. Carpentry
          7. Plumbing
          8. Domestic Electrition (not industrial)
          9. Gardening
          10. Animal raising (chickens, pigs, dairy and beef cows)
          11. Food storage (canning, drying, freezing)
          12. Making arrows from scratch
          13. Forge work
          13a. Knife making
          13b. Fire steel making
          13c. Spring making
          14. Blackpowder gunsmithing
          15. Blackpowder Gun-building
          16. Musician(clarinet, saxaphone, lap dulcimer)
          17. Cement work
          18. Writing
          19. Painting (simple enough, but if done wrong you've wasted time and money!)
          20. Plastic extrusion
          21. CNC lathe and endworking mills
          22. Farm machinery machanic
          23. Candle making
          24. Candle lantern making
          25. Sheet metal punching and forming
          26. Handloading
          27. Lead casting

          Working on: bow making, bowstring making, masonry, trapping, fishing, processing said fish, butchering of large animals(quite different from rabbit and squirral!), soap making, tracking, and land navigation with or without the compass...

          Now if I could just master a money-making I'd be all set.:D
          Last edited by ashelocoa; 11-22-2009, 12:12 PM. Reason: forgot two more!

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          • #6
            I am curious how the cement will work without the portland, or the CNC machining without the programming?

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            • #7
              Okay between my Dh and me, these are skill we use on a regular basis

              1.Animal husbandry( cows, horse, poultry, swine, dogs and cat) and vet care( caring for them naturally, with herbs)
              2.Gardening( from starting our own seedlings to saving seed)
              3.Preserving our produce( canning, dehydrating, root cellaring, lacto fermentation, and old time skill such as potting meats)
              4.Hunting and fishing, when meat is needed, not for sport
              5.Sewing, although basic and I do have a treadle sewing machine and am learning to work on it.
              6. Electrical, plumbing and wood working( with electric and manual tools)
              7. Welding( arch, wire feed, plastic, aluminum and brazing)
              8.Smithing
              9.Farrier( for our own animals only)
              10.Hydraulic mechanic( cylinder design, building and repair)
              11. Basic Handyman Mechanic: vehicles to farm equipment, to appliances, 2 stroke engines, etc....
              12.Reloading
              13.Crafts
              14.Candle making
              15. Soap making
              16. Cooking from scratch( with just basic pantry items)
              17. Homeopathics and herbal remedies( tintures, poultices, salves, etc)
              18.Basic Leather craft and tooling skills
              19.Harness/ leather repair( basic, with an awl, not a industrial machine)
              20. Cosmetology( my outside profession before kids)
              21. Metal working ( forge, bending, melting and refabrication of lead in moulds)
              22.Homeschooling Mom( well... we're offically done, but I have 16+ yrs experience)
              23.Butcher( poultry and swine, soon as we get our walk in cooler done, we'll do our own beef as well)
              24.Lumberjack( cutting down trees for our firewood, harvesting lodge pine, for posts, peeling them by hand)
              25.Farmer( irrigation, planting, haying, harvesting, manure spreading(hee, heee!)
              26.Building design( designing, drawing, materials needed list)
              27. EMT
              28.Curing meats( brine and smoking)

              We still have skills to learn, Dh is apprenticing with a gunsmith, I'm learning more frontier type skills( tanning, beading, medicinal, cooking and preserving, etc.....) the type of skills used before the invention of electricity.

              Comment


              • #8
                Cement and Machining

                Maybe I misunderstood the topic, I thought this was an overall list, but for the sake of argument I'll answer.
                Cement, in various forms, is ancient. I have several recipes. Even without the premix you can make your own, but it's proper application, preperation, and consistancy that makes it work. As for machining, these things will run on generators, but for the manually guided lathes the only subtantive difference between those and the lathes and boring machines of the Civil War era is the electric motor. They drove theirs with steam power.

                I guess I'm just not intimidated by a lack of our current system. Mankind has funtioned throughout time at varying levels of industry, and things always seem to come back around eventually. Although I am fighting to preserve our way of life, I am prepared to preserve my family's safety and provide for them no matter what. I think I wandered a bit, I hope that answered your question!

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                • #9
                  1. Firearms
                  2. Edged weapons
                  3. Security
                  4. Self defense (Hand to Hand)
                  5. Survival
                  6. Stalking
                  7. Trapping
                  8. Organizational leadership
                  9. Operations Planning
                  10. Mission Planning
                  11. Logistics
                  12. Intelligence gathering and assessing
                  13. Gardening
                  14. Preserving (dehydrating, root cellaring)
                  15. Hunting
                  16. Fishing
                  17. Sewing
                  18. Basic Handyman
                  19. Crafts
                  20. Candle making
                  21. Soap making
                  22. Cooking
                  23. Homeopathics and herbal remedies( tintures, poultices, salves, etc)
                  24. Basic Leather craft and tooling skills
                  25. Basic metal working
                  26. Butcher
                  27. Lumberjack
                  28. Farmer
                  29. First aid
                  30. Curing meats( brine and smoking)

                  Always learning more and refining current skills
                  "By Failing to Prepare, You are Preparing to Fail" -Ben Franklin

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                  • #10
                    hunting fishin plumbing welding heavy equipment trucks pottery "sewing not a word big saw"skinin cooking tanin construction edged weapons 6 years hand to hand combat training gardeningsmall and large engine repair"hey kid's learn to set points" hydralics boatsmanship more too come
                    the pack that plays together stays together

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                    • #11
                      I live on a ranch and have aquired alot of 'get a bigger hammer' skills. Home and barn building, irrigation, septic, fencing, livestock care, equine care and training, saddle making, moving heavy objects, road building, tree cutting, general staying alive, making things work, type stuff. Wife has her skill set, and looks better doing it.
                      The road to serfdom is paved with free electric golf carts.

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                      • #12
                        This is a list now some of these may be redundant if so I am sorry. Some may not seem like what you think you will need or your cup of tea. I found them important enough at one point in my life to learn so evedently they have helped me survive to this point at least once.

                        (1) sales, commuinication, talk-off con man NLP call it what you want
                        (2) Auto Repair/desiel/ big and small/ and all "southern engeneering" to do without com auto parts
                        (3) gardening
                        (4)carpantry, frame, wire, roof, plumbing, gas,
                        (5) Concrete
                        (6) Housold chemistry (evening at the improv type) i.e. need HNO3? Got H2SO4 I can do it!
                        (7) Energetic Material mfg and handeling and application (improv and commerical)
                        (8) Brewing/ Vintering/Distilling (with and without commerical sugar and yeast)
                        (9) First Aid (way beyond band-aids)
                        (10) Welding/cutting/burning/braizeing/MiG/ TiG/Stik/Oxy: map/acytline/hydrogen
                        (11) Machining manual and CNC and asso mill wright tasks
                        (12) skip tracing baisc investigation interveiw and interrogation
                        (13) basic woods skills hunt, trap,fish,ediable plants, orenteering
                        (14) tools and weapons improv use and repair (sharpening, basic gunsmithing, etc)
                        (15) basic combat skills ,dont walk on roads, preserve night vison different fighting pos etc.
                        (16) Zoopharmacognosy i.e. poppy to pain killer, dyes, medcines, pesticides, poisons,glue etc
                        (17) rigging rope, chain, straps, knots
                        (18) Bi-lingual English Espanol
                        (19) Low life skills, lock picking, beating alarms, sneaking, ambush etc.
                        (20) Fighting, TKD, Savate, rifle, pistol, shotgun, asax (knife,sword,club)

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                        • #13
                          (1) Carpentry
                          (2) Plumbing
                          (3) Electrical
                          (4) Roofing
                          (5) Siding
                          (6) Landscaping
                          (7) Gardening
                          (8) Sewing
                          (9) Brewing
                          (10) Herbal ID/use
                          (11) Fire craft
                          (12) First aid EMT
                          (13) Blade sharpening
                          (14) Knots
                          (15) Hunting
                          (16) Fishing
                          (17) Trapping
                          (18) Field dressing
                          (19) Cooking
                          (20) Harmonica some guitar
                          I only listed barter/trade skills and I am by no means a pro at most of them. Good thread. It really made me sit and evaluate my usefulness should the need arise.

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                          • #14
                            Does getting older count? I'm mostly a jack of all trades and master of none.
                            As Zombie Axe would say...
                            "Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty."

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                            • #15
                              wilderness first aid
                              EMT
                              Fire Fighter 1
                              gardening
                              metal fabrication
                              welder
                              armature gun smith
                              firearms instructor....NRA cert
                              jerky
                              canning
                              cooking
                              sewing
                              carpenter
                              marksman
                              "get it done" engineer
                              Scout Leader
                              a lot of primitive skills...
                              a lot of farm skills....

                              a jack of all trades....master of some...
                              Live like you'll die tomorrow, learn like you'll live forever.

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