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  • survivalguy
    replied
    heres something similar take 2 space blankets (they are made of mylar and are waterproof) open one up and place a ton of dry leaves on it then take the second space blanket and lay it on top of the leaves lie on one edge of it grabbing the edges and roll like a burrito instant sleeping bag and shelter also you can be seen from the air due to the shiny mylar.

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  • Stitch
    replied
    Take a nylon net dish scrubbie and put in your canteen to lessen the noise of water sloshing when trying to move like a ghost.

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  • tommyboy4090
    replied
    One thing i learned as a kid that helps in all cold environments is put a pair of dress socks on then put on a normal pair of socks and that will keep your feet toasty.

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  • Centurion
    replied
    I generally wear long underwear so as not to be cold in the winter. This avoids the temptation to want to camp to close to the open fire. In a SHTF environment were safety and security are at stake you will have to have a cold camp which means no fire. Might as well get used to it now. " As you train so shall you fight".

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  • nakadnu
    replied
    Weatherproof sleeping bag liner.
    I took 2 6x8 tarps and weaved them together on 3 sides with paracord and duct taped the edges then turn it inside out and duct tape the edges again for a weatherproof seal. Leave the corner grommets exposed so you can stake it down. Put your sleeping bag inside and crawl in for maximum comfort. This can be used to keep anything dry that will fit inside. I am thinking I could use a shortened tent pole to prop the front open to let in the heat from a fire.

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  • Centurion
    replied
    great post about wd-40

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  • tommyboy4090
    replied
    I use silicone lube. for my fishing reels. Lubes them up and keeps dirt and trash from sticking. Also if you do any salt water fishing keeps salt from messing up reels by corrosion(as bad). I also use it to lube up the barrel(outside) and slide rails on my guns.

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  • Oatmealer
    replied
    I'm curious to try it on fishing lures. However, I would not want to find out that I killed the entire eco-system of the fishing hole lol. Just does not seem safe to me! Don't use it too often to clean your hands of grease or glue. My business partner sustained pretty substantial liver damage from cleaning his hands with solvents, mostly WD40 and the like. (He is a non drinker).

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  • tommyboy4090
    replied
    Good post about WD 40 that is like the rednecks best friend. I like to use silicone lubricant to protect shoes works a little better I think. Also if you carry a gun with a leather holster and it gets a little hard drawing and re holstering the gun spray a little silicone lub. in it and let it dry. Silicone lub. also helps waterproof anything you put it on, tent, socks, shoes, hats, and about anything else far and between.

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  • Oatmealer
    replied
    Here is the link... Many many more uses from Readers Digest...

    http://www.rd.com/home-garden/extrao...icle24059.html

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  • Oatmealer
    replied
    WD40 Uses :) I don't know about you, but I keep a can in my truck, my workshop, my kitchen and a really small one in my pack. (This is not authored by me)

    Treat your shoes
    Spray WD-40 on new leather shoes before you start wearing them regularly. It will help prevent blisters by softening the leather and making the shoes more comfortable. Keep the shoes waterproof and shiny by spraying them periodically with WD-40 and buffing gently with a soft cloth. To give the old "soft shoo" to squeaky shoes, spray some WD-40 at the spot where the sole and heel join and the squeaks will cease.

    Free stuck Lego blocks
    When Junior's construction project hits a snag because some of the plastic blocks are stuck together, let WD-40 help get them unstuck. Spray a little on the blocks where they are locked together, then wiggle them gently and pull them apart. The lubricant in WD-40 will penetrate into the fine seam where the blocks are joined.

    Tone down polyurethane shine
    A new coat of polyurethane can sometimes make a wood floor look a little too shiny. To tone down the shine and cut the glare, spray some WD-40 onto a soft cloth and wipe up the floor with it.

    Remove strong glue
    You didn't wear protective gloves when using that super-strong glue and now some of it is super-stuck to your fingers! Don't panic. Just reach for the WD-40, spray some directly on the sticky fingers, and rub your hands together until your fingers are no longer sticky. Use WD-40 to remove the glue from other unwanted surfaces as well.

    Free stuck fingers
    Use WD-40 to free Junior's finger when he gets it stuck in a bottle. Just spray it on the finger, let it seep in, and pull the finger out. Be sure to wash Junior's hand and the bottle afterward.

    Loosen zippers
    Stubborn zippers on jackets, pants, backpacks, and sleeping bags will become compliant again after you spray them with WD-40. Just spray it on and pull the zipper up and down a few times to distribute the lubricant evenly over all the teeth. If you want to avoid getting the WD-40 on the fabric, spray it on a plastic lid; then pick it up and apply it with an artist's brush.

    Exterminate roaches and repel insects
    Don't let cockroaches, insects, or spiders get the upper hand in your home.

    * Keep a can of WD-40 handy, and when you see a roach, spray a small amount directly on it for an instant kill.
    * To keep insects and spiders out of your home, spray WD-40 on windowsills and frames, screens, and door frames. Be careful not to inhale the fumes when you spray and do not do this at all if you have babies or small children at home.

    Keep wooden tool handles splinter-free
    No tools can last forever, but you can prolong the life of your wood-handled tools by preventing splintering. To keep wooden handles from splintering, rub a generous amount of WD-40 into the wood. It will shield the wood from moisture and other corrosive elements and keep it smooth and splinter-free for the life of the tool.

    In the Great Outdoors

    Winterproof boots and shoes
    Waterproof your winter boots and shoes by giving them a coat of WD-40. It'll act as a barrier so water can't penetrate the material. Also use WD-40 to remove ugly salt stains from boots and shoes during the winter months. Just spray WD-40 onto the stains and wipe with a clean rag. Your boots and shoes will look almost as good as new.

    Protect your boat from corrosion
    To protect your boat's outer finish from salt water and corrosion, spray WD-40 on the stern immediately after each use. The short time it takes will save you from having to replace parts, and it will keep your boat looking like it did on the day you bought it for a long time to come.

    Remove barnacles on boats
    Removing barnacles from the bottom of a boat is a difficult and odious task but you can make it easier and less unpleasant with the help of some WD-40. Spray the area generously with WD-40, wait a few seconds, and then use a putty knife to scrape off the barnacles. Spray any remnants with WD-40 and scrape again. If necessary, use sandpaper to get rid of all of the remnants and corrosive glue still left by the barnacles.

    Spray on fishing lures
    Salmon fishermen in the Pacific Northwest spray their lures with WD-40 because it attracts fish and disguises the human odor that can scare them off and keep them from biting. You can increase the catch on your next fishing trip by bringing a can of WD-40 along with you and spraying it on your lures or live bait before you cast. But first check local regulations to make sure the use of chemical-laced lures and bait is legal in your state.

    Untangle fishing lines
    To loosen a tangled fishing line, spray it with WD-40 and use a pin to undo any small knots. Also use WD-40 to extend the life of curled (but not too old) fishing lines. Just take out the first 10 to 20 feet of line and spray it with WD-40 the night before each trip.

    Remove burrs
    To remove burrs from a horse's mane or tail without tearing its hair out (or having to cut any of its hair off!) just spray on some WD-40. You'll be able to slide the burrs right out. This will work for dogs and cats, too.

    Protect horses' hooves
    Winter horseback riding can be fun if you are warmly dressed but it can be downright painful to your horse if ice forms on the horseshoes. To keep ice from forming on horseshoes during cold winter rides, spray the bottom of the horse's hooves with WD-40 before you set out.

    Keep flies off cows
    If flies are tormenting your cows, just spray some WD-40 on the cows. Flies hate the smell and they'll stay clear. Take care not to spray any WD-40 in the cows' eyes.
    Last edited by Oatmealer; 09-03-2010, 09:35 PM. Reason: Incorrect Paste

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  • tommyboy4090
    replied
    I didn't see this posted anywhere so here it is take a business card and wrap duct tape long ways on a business card. It is a real space savor plus lets you put duct tape in different compartments or kits.

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  • tommyboy4090
    replied
    One thing i learned from my papa as a kid was wrap snare wire, and para cord around knife sheath then put tape over that. then get some ranger bands and put on there tight and put fishing line and hooks and razor blade(in paper package) under that.
    Last edited by tommyboy4090; 08-30-2010, 08:02 PM. Reason: spelling error

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  • tbkbtk123
    replied
    Didn't use the axe, a cold chisel worked well!

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  • nakadnu
    replied
    Get out your axe!
    Originally posted by tbkbtk123 View Post
    Nakadnu, Thank you for the tip on the magnesium rod in the water heater.
    I happened to have an old one that I just changed out and I dug past the insulation and found the nut that you are talking about.
    Now with the old water heater being older than dirt, all I need is a cheater pipe to attach to my 1/2 breaker bar to break the nut loose! LOL

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