Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cheap Shelters

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by rancher View Post
    A very good point for all. If you have the property and can do it without hiring it out. Once you hire that project out the knowledge of it is now known to others. Best to rent the back hoe and do it yourself.

    We did our own under ground concrete lined room. It also houses the main generator and stoers a lot of food as it has the perfect temperature for that.
    Rancher can you give a little insight about the construction concerns and any/all problems you’ve had with an underground shelter…

    Is ventilation a problem?
    Is it always damp?
    Leakage and drainage?

    I’d be interested in anything you had to say about the construction and up keep of this underground room
    ~ Awesome ~

    Comment


    • #17
      Just some thoughts....

      Happy to...

      First know your land...are their seasonal springs or extra wet spots which gather water in the wet season. If so don’t go there.

      Next a hillside is best. Backhoe makes life more enjoyable and you live longer.

      Have a plan or blueprint of your mission. I drew one up and a complete materials list before I replaced our 14 x 14 covered shooting area. Then I built it myself in two days time. Just four days ago.

      We have a poured 4" cement floor with re-bar. About 10' wide and 14' long. Walls are cement building blocks with re-bar and then filled with cement. About 6.5' high.

      Just buy a cement mixer and do it yourself. That way no one knows what you are doing. Like the cement truck driver...

      Frame up a ceiling with 4x4 posts and plywood to form a bottom to pour the ceiling. Use a lot of re-bar. Steel spanners every couple feet are very good to hold it together. Get help from and engineer on that.

      Mix cement and pour until the cows come home :-)

      The door on our is over 36" wide.

      Design 4" vertical air vents at the rear or the room. Have a louvered air intake in the lower portion of you door. You can also add a secondary intake piped to a rock pile of some other hidden location. Paint the outlet pipe black and cut it at a 45 degree slope on top. Cover with fine mess screen. No bugs, very little water. Or just put a vented cap on top. The black will draw warmth from the sun and begin a drafting effect. Colder air will come in via the low intake louvered door opening, cross the room gather moisture and exit the top vent. You can add a powered intake or exhaust fan.

      There are solar powered small flat fans we used on our wooden boats. 3-4 inches across and they begin spin the impeller once the sun hits them. Could be placed on top or the exit pipe. These will vet the place during the daylight times.

      If possible run underground power to the building. The exterior walls can be painted with a special waterproofing material while being built. So can the ceiling. Cover ceiling with a foot of dirt or so. Crown it to provide run off slope. One can also lay down a couple layers of plastic first to help divert rain water. It takes many years for the soil to re-ompact again.

      Gently refill open areas with dirt. One can lay a drain field pipe around the outside wall bottom and slope in towards the front. Thus draining any water leaking down during the rains and giving it a quick way out.

      We cemented the approaching sloping walls to the door and then covered them in light weight fake rocks. Planted vegetation and grass back in place.

      It never freezes in there even when it gets down to minus 20 outside. Is always cool in the summer...almost cold and chilly on a hot day. With some fore thought it can be made into a shelter bunker. But then you are stuck in there if found out? Whatever you heart desires I guess.

      One can wire it for a back up generator like we did and vent that correctly. Or not...

      This is a project. A pre-mde storage unit is faster but will require delivery and install. Other then know. I have heard of using huge metal drain pipe? But round is not fun to load stuff in. A well design basement room when building a home is cheaper by far.

      We have that as well.... Good luck.

      Comment


      • #18
        Thank you thank you . :)

        Originally posted by Omegaman View Post
        I watched some show on HGTV that showed houses made from these cargo containers. The house that they showed were different sizes and they all cost a 1/4 of what the same size house to build. The houses were also in different parts of the country, from Maine to Texas. You treat the containers like modules, they are rated to be stacked on top of each other. A couple of them had huge great or common rooms created by placing the containers 26ft or more a part from each other and then capping the open space with enginered roof trusses. I have seen a work shop / welding shop made from 4 of the 20 footers being stacked. The containers in most places are avilable in 10x8x8, 20x8x8 and 40x8x8. I have been looking at buying some remote land for a hunting camp and putting a cargo container home on it. The great thing is that they are fire proof and pest proof. The big cost would be stacking them because you need a crane or excavator.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by rancher View Post
          Happy to...

          First know your land...are their seasonal springs or extra wet spots which gather water in the wet season. If so don’t go there.

          Next a hillside is best. Backhoe makes life more enjoyable and you live longer.

          Have a plan or blueprint of your mission. I drew one up and a complete materials list before I replaced our 14 x 14 covered shooting area. Then I built it myself in two days time. Just four days ago.

          We have a poured 4" cement floor with re-bar. About 10' wide and 14' long. Walls are cement building blocks with re-bar and then filled with cement. About 6.5' high.

          Just buy a cement mixer and do it yourself. That way no one knows what you are doing. Like the cement truck driver...

          Frame up a ceiling with 4x4 posts and plywood to form a bottom to pour the ceiling. Use a lot of re-bar. Steel spanners every couple feet are very good to hold it together. Get help from and engineer on that.

          Mix cement and pour until the cows come home :-)

          The door on our is over 36" wide.

          Design 4" vertical air vents at the rear or the room. Have a louvered air intake in the lower portion of you door. You can also add a secondary intake piped to a rock pile of some other hidden location. Paint the outlet pipe black and cut it at a 45 degree slope on top. Cover with fine mess screen. No bugs, very little water. Or just put a vented cap on top. The black will draw warmth from the sun and begin a drafting effect. Colder air will come in via the low intake louvered door opening, cross the room gather moisture and exit the top vent. You can add a powered intake or exhaust fan.

          There are solar powered small flat fans we used on our wooden boats. 3-4 inches across and they begin spin the impeller once the sun hits them. Could be placed on top or the exit pipe. These will vet the place during the daylight times.

          If possible run underground power to the building. The exterior walls can be painted with a special waterproofing material while being built. So can the ceiling. Cover ceiling with a foot of dirt or so. Crown it to provide run off slope. One can also lay down a couple layers of plastic first to help divert rain water. It takes many years for the soil to re-ompact again.

          Gently refill open areas with dirt. One can lay a drain field pipe around the outside wall bottom and slope in towards the front. Thus draining any water leaking down during the rains and giving it a quick way out.

          We cemented the approaching sloping walls to the door and then covered them in light weight fake rocks. Planted vegetation and grass back in place.

          It never freezes in there even when it gets down to minus 20 outside. Is always cool in the summer...almost cold and chilly on a hot day. With some fore thought it can be made into a shelter bunker. But then you are stuck in there if found out? Whatever you heart desires I guess.

          One can wire it for a back up generator like we did and vent that correctly. Or not...

          This is a project. A pre-mde storage unit is faster but will require delivery and install. Other then know. I have heard of using huge metal drain pipe? But round is not fun to load stuff in. A well design basement room when building a home is cheaper by far.

          We have that as well.... Good luck.
          You are such a Dear,
          Thanks for all the input, sounds like you have given this type of thing Lot's of thought and then went out and did it,I know who I would go to for help with my hidy hole, if I was doing it in your area.
          If I had my way I would only hire those from this site that we're serious about Survival Tech: probably could trust most of you on this site.
          Thanks again for your input.

          Comment


          • #20
            Rancher is right. I have a cargo container that is used for storage, the cost to insulate,and add a bathroom and kitchen facilites would far exceed the cost of a used camper.
            As for burying one....while the walls are built to hold the weight of several more stacked on top, the roof is not load bearing and would need reinforcement to support a direct load.
            A poured concrete structure is the best,(for burial) i have seen great things done with 10 to 15 ft diameter stainless culvert pipe as well. (the arched structure will support tons of weight)
            For books about earth bermed/sheltered houses or other alternative building methods check out the bookstore at MotherEarthNews.com
            CTHULHU/Dagon 2012

            Comment


            • #21
              Buddamom: Look at a septic tank. May be big enough for what you want. Makes a good storm shelter (must be buried) and root seller. Easy to water proof and cheap. Lots of people use them, they just don't talk about it. I've seen two or more of them connected for a bigger shelter. They can be used exactly as you describe.

              Comment


              • #22
                As far as protecting the metal, about the best thing I know of would be the same stuff we spray on all our Space center projects. It is a zinc chromate spray that must be applied to a sandblasted "white" surface. It is expensive but once it dries you can't hardly sandblast it off. It protects all the launch pads out at the space center as we speak. Only problem is I am not sure John Q. Public can buy it unless you are a contractor. I will try to find out.

                Comment


                • #23
                  [I am not sure John Q. Public can buy it unless you are a contractor. I will try to find out.]

                  Its available through automotive paint suppliers.
                  O.W.
                  Things are seldom what they seem.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Ok I'm now expert but I have built houses since I was knee high to a brarhopper. This is an absolute great idea. It possible to build. All you need is a strong back and the will power to do it. I have looked into this for awhile now . Just be sure to put it at least 36 inchs below ground. This way you are protected from fallout. Air filteration and water are the hardest part of the build. And prehaps the most expensive. If you have questions ask away.
                    Last edited by kentuckyshiner85; 04-03-2011, 10:54 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      if your thinking of burying them use the paint they use on mobile home roofs its latex it is waterproof and it gives. i built a house with ice blocks. ok iceblock are styrifom form and you fill with concret.they recominded this stuff and beleive me it works it was year before i back filled and water was standing up on the wall no leaks non. later i got around to putting in drains and back fill still no leaks. been in the building trade for 30 + years

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Shipping containers are absolutely a good investment. Burying one requires it to be painted with epoxy paint on all sides to protect from rusting. Also to get good r value without having to add insulation to the interior of the container it must be at least 4 feet underground from my understanding. Only other concerns would be a good sorce of air and natural light and at least two exits. Don't want to build a tomb for yourself.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I thought about that for 1 bug out location but my question was how could I get water and heat. And location is everything. Once there, you can't move it easily. For half that money I have a pop-up that I just LOVE. Sleeps 6, has fridge, stoves, sink, easy water, heat. Runs on gas/battery/elec. And being cranked down, it's so easy to hitch it on & move and camouflage.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X