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my lean-to shelter

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  • my lean-to shelter

    http://ridgid1tacktics.blogspot.com/
    :cool:
    proper preparedness prevents poor performance

  • #2
    Nice. Hope the rain doesn't start blowing!

    Looks like very good practice!
    JUST CURIOUS? PRUNES ARE DEHYDRATED PLUMS. SO WHERE DOES PRUNE JUICE COME FROM?

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    • #3
      You did a good job on your lean-to, I just wanted to chime in and say we built one similar to this on down on the farm meny years ago, my dad is a smart old guy and to get us to drag limbs he started this lean to it was made out of mostly ceader and oak and had 2 sides so it look kind of like an "A" frame. He got us all jacked up to have a place to camp out, he got his limbs and small trees dragged into the woods and guess what?

      That the darn thing is still standing and has probblY 2-3 feet of leaves and limbs on it and inside is really dry.

      I think dad used nails for the frame and it does have good sized ceader trees for the main supports but we are taking 20 years now mabe more. I was amazed anything or any part of it would still be standing.
      Its a little squished but in an emergency I could sleep in it.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BARRACUDABILLY View Post
        You did a good job on your lean-to, I just wanted to chime in and say we built one similar to this on down on the farm meny years ago, my dad is a smart old guy and to get us to drag limbs he started this lean to it was made out of mostly ceader and oak and had 2 sides so it look kind of like an "A" frame. He got us all jacked up to have a place to camp out, he got his limbs and small trees dragged into the woods and guess what?

        That the darn thing is still standing and has probblY 2-3 feet of leaves and limbs on it and inside is really dry.

        I think dad used nails for the frame and it does have good sized ceader trees for the main supports but we are taking 20 years now mabe more. I was amazed anything or any part of it would still be standing.
        Its a little squished but in an emergency I could sleep in it.
        Really neat story. Any chance you could post a pic? I, for one, would like to see it.
        JUST CURIOUS? PRUNES ARE DEHYDRATED PLUMS. SO WHERE DOES PRUNE JUICE COME FROM?

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        • #5
          Cool lean-to Ridgid, how long did it take with a hatchet?

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          • #6
            Cool another blog to read :)

            Nice lean to, how to :)
            73

            later,
            ZA

            Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to
            beat you to death with it because it is empty.

            The faster you finish the fight, the less shot you will get.

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            • #7
              dibs too ya man i too built one as a child there is a neighbor hood there now though dam city people any way good job
              the pack that plays together stays together

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              • #8
                yea i thought if I was to really use it I would build another side for but make it detachable.....cutting wood with the hatchet didnt take long...just chop in a v patern all the way around the log then break it off when the center is all thats left just a couple minutes it takes to chop each log with a sharp hatchet.... I like to carry a hatchet with me cause I can also use the other end as a hammer, multi tool!! The whole thing prob. took me like 6-7 hours, but it was fun and worth the experiance...the rocks really help heat up the bed too...I thought that was really cool .... hopefully I will never have to build one to actually stay in ...I carry a hamock and tarp in my BOB anyways.... :cool:
                proper preparedness prevents poor performance

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                • #9
                  wodering what to do 4 my next one? off to the drawing board!:rolleyes:
                  proper preparedness prevents poor performance

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