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Buying a generator

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  • Buying a generator

    Been looking for a generator for a while and found this one on craigslist. Would this be sufficent to power a small cabin?

    http://winstonsalem.craigslist.org/for/976706882.html
    Diplomacy is the art of saying "nice doggie" while picking up a big stick.

  • #2
    Should be able to do a small cabin. I have a 5500W that powers all my lighting load in the home as well as the wellpump.

    I can also use window AC units for AC in the summer if needed. However it will not power my heat pump which is not a problem in the winter as I have wood heat if needed :)

    So yes, 5600 should be a plenty for a cabin, but not for a central air or heating system unless if is a gas/oil system that only has a 120V blower motor...


    To help calculate loads, I highly suggest looking at the Kill A Watt Meter... this device measures the wattage of items that are plugged into it to help calculate loads... http://www.p3international.com/produ.../P4400-CE.html
    73

    later,
    ZA

    Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to
    beat you to death with it because it is empty.

    The faster you finish the fight, the less shot you will get.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Zombie Axe View Post
      Should be able to do a small cabin. I have a 5500W that powers all my lighting load in the home as well as the wellpump.

      I can also use window AC units for AC in the summer if needed. However it will not power my heat pump which is not a problem in the winter as I have wood heat if needed :)

      So yes, 5600 should be a plenty for a cabin, but not for a central air or heating system unless if is a gas/oil system that only has a 120V blower motor...


      To help calculate loads, I highly suggest looking at the Kill A Watt Meter... this device measures the wattage of items that are plugged into it to help calculate loads... http://www.p3international.com/produ.../P4400-CE.html

      Thanks for the info.

      I just really need it to take care of lights,small fridge and maybe a well pump so this looks like it should do the trick.
      Diplomacy is the art of saying "nice doggie" while picking up a big stick.

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      • #4
        I have a 8300 peak, 6600 cont.

        I can run our electric oven, electric dryer, etc. one at a time. We are dropped off the grid about once a month and it gets plenty of exercise. I converted it to propane but can still use gasoline. I have a 500 gal. buried propane tank. We don't even notice the difference to our power supply when it is running. I LOVE winter storms that isolate me from the rest of the area. Best of times!
        JUST CURIOUS? PRUNES ARE DEHYDRATED PLUMS. SO WHERE DOES PRUNE JUICE COME FROM?

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