Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Kerosene/lamp oil

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    you can also use olive oil
    AAJ

    Comment


    • #32
      Used vegi oil also works. Filter it through an old t-shirt.
      If it was man made it can be man re-made.

      Comment


      • #33
        I would also like to know if Kerosene or lamp oil have a shelf life ( Can they go bad like gasoline )

        Comment


        • #34
          Haymaker, I have used lamp oil that was 7 or 8 years old. The reason gas goes bad is getting water in it from heating and cooling and condensation. It is worse now since we are adding ethanol, which draws water. So your lamp oil sitting in a cool dark place should last a lifetime as far as I know.
          "Oh, America. I wish I could tell you that this was still America, but I've come to realize that you can't have a country without people. And there are no people here. No, my friends. This is now the United States of Zombieland"

          "The constitution does not guarantee our safety, only our liberty!" Robert Steed before congress 3/2013

          Skills Beats Stuff

          Comment


          • #35
            I have never had a problem with lamp oil. I have used some up last year that was over 15 years old. Just wish you could keep gasoline like that, but that just won't work.

            Comment


            • #36
              One of the best oil lamps on the market is from a company called "Aladdin Lamps" They have been around for years.

              Click image for larger version

Name:	VC2312 alexandria-clear-20131004-130514.JPG
Views:	1
Size:	30.4 KB
ID:	187583

              Here is the company link! They have a FAQ or some videos if I'm not mistaken:

              http://www.aladdinlamps.com/

              -Buggy
              I'm not a fatalist. I'm a realist.

              Comment


              • #37
                We run a number of kerosene lamps and lanterns (by choice) and we use #1 diesel fuel. (NOT #2 diesel which smokes badly!). #1 diesel fuel burns relatively cleanly and currenty sells at some gas stations in our area for around $3.00 per gallon.

                If there is a difference in the performance between kerosene and #1 deisel, I cannot detect it; other than the tremendous price difference.

                Comment


                • #38
                  in regard to old kerosene - water tainted from poor storage - here's a handy solution ....

                  http://www.milesstair.com/Mr.Funnel.html

                  if you ever had a question on kerosene - here's your answer

                  http://www.milesstair.com/kero_fuel_primer.html

                  here's Mile's main page - wicks for kerosene heaters & lamps ....

                  http://www.milesstair.com/


                  best of all - Miles is a fellow prepper .... not a hippie dippy Bernie incense sniffer

                  here's his blog - http://endtimesreport.com/ - more good info 4 U

                  here's his prep item shop - http://endtimesreport.com/survival_shop.html

                  been looking for oddball kerosene prep items? ... good chance it's here -

                  http://stpaulmercantile.com/index.ph...afh1o3lv05ssr7
                  Last edited by Illini Warrior; 01-29-2017, 05:36 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    I use several different lights.
                    A candle lantern with liquid candles with citronella to keep the bugs away. Very low light but enuff to get around when very dark. Good for talking and drinking. Does not spill or blow out.
                    Oil lanterns with PURE OIL. A little brighter than the candle. Good for eating and drinking, kinda romantic. Can be hoisted up the forestay and used for an anchor light, won't blow out. Produces a good deal of heat above, so don't get it too close to the top or boom with the cover on, about 9 inches is safe, less if a good breeze.
                    I have two Coleman propane https://bestoutdooritems.com/5-best-...erns-oil-lamp/ lanterns. They are the small single mantle ones that just screw on to the cylinder. They produce enuff light to be able to read by but throw off a lot of heat. They won't blow out and can be used as an anchor light.On YouTube there are a lot of interesting videos on the topic of comparison, so look at this, I hope this helps when choosing
                     

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      another vote for the oil lamps. We keep several at home and camp; when the power goes out, the kids look on the lamps as a time for fun, like camping. I've also modified some of my smaller mason jars, turning them into oil lamps and they have turned out great.
                      Brass-plated, fits regular mouth canning jar. 3/more $1.50 each!
                      Last edited by lalakai; 05-08-2018, 09:41 PM.
                      Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        growing up Mom always kept 2 decorative brass lanterns on top the china cabinet (in fact still there to this day) that we'd grab when the power went out. it was the quick at hand thing ready to go even if it'd been a few years since they were last lit. then we'd get the 'ol Coleman gas lantern out and ready in case we needed extra light. she never liked candles around, said to much risk of a fire.

                        now we have several Larry lights around for a quick grab and some LED lamps that are very bright, totally safe and don't put off heat. I usually still will go grab a propane coleman from our gear as a just in case or in instance it's winter and want a little more warmth. I wondered about those oil lamps in the canning jar but with little bumblers all around the house thought they might not be best for us.
                        I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by lalakai View Post
                          another vote for the oil lamps. We keep several at home and camp; when the power goes out, the kids look on the lamps as a time for fun, like camping. I've also modified some of my smaller mason jars, turning them into oil lamps and they have turned out great.
                          here is the link to the entire kit...

                          https://www.lehmans.com/product/maso...-complete-kit/
                          I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            When my family and I lived in Japan they used portable Kerosene heaters since electrical power is so expensive. You fill it during the day and light it up at dark. they last about 12 hours and keep you warm. Make sure the equipment you plan on buying is usable INDOORS!

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by lazer128 View Post
                              I agree with Brosia. Don't use citronella indoors. You can, however use bio-diesel. You should not have too much trouble finding someone to sell you what you will need. I have a friend not far from you (coast) that I am sure will sell you what you want. I wouldn't be surprised if he didn't give it to you. He makes 40 gallons or so at a time.

                              I found this when I was looking ........

                              http://www.chemistryland.com/Biodies...nBiodiesel.htm
                              Biodiesel will not work in a standard oil lamp. It requires that you change the wick because it won't climb a standard wick that kerosene does. I've tried it, it doesn't work.

                              You can make kerosene at home easily enough however. Its been made by various societies for hundreds of years. The easiest way is to just heat up coal, when it starts to sweat like a cold beer on a hot day, that's kerosene, but you can also pull kerosene from most plastics like grocery bags, plastic milk jugs, plastic 55 gallon drums, and pretty much anything made out of polyethylene.
                              I think 1 Kg of plastic will yield about 1 liter of oil.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Murphy, can you share a little more of the procedure on converting the plastic into kerosene.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X