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Jobs/Skills for tough times

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  • Jobs/Skills for tough times

    Doesn't matter to me whether you call it a recession, depression, adjustment or whatever, let's just call it the tough times that are coming.

    What jobs/skills would you find useful in the long run. Not just to survive, but dare I say prosper? I've heard suggestions like mechanic, welder, and medical field.

    What do you think that an individual of average intelligence should learn not only to survive, but also provide for the family?
    ENJOY AND STAY SAFE

    TEOTWAWKI happens to all of us everyday. Always be prepared!

    P.A.W.T. = PROUD AMERICAN WHITE TRASH

  • #2
    Everyone can and should learn: basic carpentry, simple first aid, orienteering, game preparation, cooking, fishing, basic vehicle maintenance, group communication, fire making, comprehension of basic math/english/science and simple herbology/agriculture. If everyone learned the basics they would definetly increase their survival rate drastically.
    Perfer et obdura; dolor hic tibi proderit olim.
    ~ Be patient and tough; some day this pain will be useful to you.-Ovid

    Mus uni non fidit antro.
    ~ A mouse does not rely on just one hole.-Plautus

    Non semper erit aestas
    ~ It will not always be summer.

    Comment


    • #3
      I would like to break each of these rather broad categories down into specific knowledge tasks. As an example I know how to frame a wall and install a roof but I have only done so while helping a friend build a shed outside his house. Does that mean I have basic carpentry skills? No it doesn't.

      Similar I have made a fire on dozens of occasions including with some rather interesting low tech methods but at what point do I consider myself competent enough for a survival situation?

      If we had a way to know I would feel more comfortable in my skills. As it is the four times I can sneak away each year to camp often becomes more of a test of my patience with the family than a real learning experience.

      I try to test the gear and skills I have learned but if you are anything like me there are only so many excuses you can come up with for testing your knot tying skills before you start to get funny looks from friends and family.

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      • #4
        My desire was to break down these skill sets into two categories.

        Those "survival" skills utilized should the big balloon really go up. Something where you and yours are forced from your home and required to live in the out of doors (sort of like a real long camping trip). Ya, after 35+ yrs. of camping with the Scouts and the family I am relatively confident with my camping skills. However, I realize that on all of those outings we've slept in tents and ate the food we brought with us (except for the wilderness survival week ends). Eventually, that stuff will run out so the hunter/gatherer skills need to be developed.

        The "tough times" skills for when you are still in your home and most everything is still functioning (except possibly the economy). Say you are a welder and "John" breaks his gizmo. You are able to weld/repair it for John for some type of compensation. People are always getting sick/injured, so skills in the medical field working at a hospital or care center for compensation would be good. I'd like to hear what skills you all think would be an asset.

        I was lucky enoough to be a Scout leader, so practicing skills never raised an eyebrow. As the Scouts would be off doing their thing at the campouts, the leaders would sit around (we called it a cracker barrel) and literally practice skills. It was our form of relaxation. Never raised an eyebrow (except for the guy whho did nothing but sharpen his knives) haha.
        ENJOY AND STAY SAFE

        TEOTWAWKI happens to all of us everyday. Always be prepared!

        P.A.W.T. = PROUD AMERICAN WHITE TRASH

        Comment


        • #5
          I agree that is a good idea. Physical conditioning and mental toughness cannot be ignored in either scenario. If like me you have returned from a three day camping trip excited but physically tired you know there is a long way to go if you find yourself in a true survival scenario.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by das View Post
            I would like to break each of these rather broad categories down into specific knowledge tasks. As an example I know how to frame a wall and install a roof but I have only done so while helping a friend build a shed outside his house. Does that mean I have basic carpentry skills? No it doesn't.

            Similar I have made a fire on dozens of occasions including with some rather interesting low tech methods but at what point do I consider myself competent enough for a survival situation?

            How does knowing how to frame not make you knowledgeable of basic carpentry? All you have to do is put on some siding and install that roof and you have an uninsulated building. And anyone can staple insulation between the beams. Framing also means you had to measure and cut the wood and then nail it into a frame. What else is there to wood working? Basic knowledge. Also if you can make fire with low tech methods wouldn't you think you have the basic ability to make fire. If you had to use your basic skills in a survival situation over and over for months you would then become skilled at it. It doesn't take much to survive at all. Your body can take a lot more than you think, just because you haven't had to do it yet.
            Last edited by Legionnaire; 10-08-2008, 07:06 AM.
            Perfer et obdura; dolor hic tibi proderit olim.
            ~ Be patient and tough; some day this pain will be useful to you.-Ovid

            Mus uni non fidit antro.
            ~ A mouse does not rely on just one hole.-Plautus

            Non semper erit aestas
            ~ It will not always be summer.

            Comment


            • #7
              You are correct I am not worried about my ability to build with lumber but in a survival situation I have no experience with making lumber, treating lumber or really any hand tools beyond a square, saw, hammer, crowbar and a push drill my grandfather used.

              I guess my point is that it wasn't that I couldn't build a small structure but that I am unsure of my ability to do so in an emergency situation.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by das View Post
                You are correct I am not worried about my ability to build with lumber but in a survival situation I have no experience with making lumber, treating lumber or really any hand tools beyond a square, saw, hammer, crowbar and a push drill my grandfather used.

                I guess my point is that it wasn't that I couldn't build a small structure but that I am unsure of my ability to do so in an emergency situation.
                Fair enough, for survival construction I would recommend looking at a few history books. Check out what local Native Americans did or early settlers. They didn't have nearly as much as us to work with and they thrived for the most part.

                Also everyone should snag a copy of this to help with a simple but very important skill.

                http://www.nols.edu/store/product.ph...8&cat=0&page=1
                Perfer et obdura; dolor hic tibi proderit olim.
                ~ Be patient and tough; some day this pain will be useful to you.-Ovid

                Mus uni non fidit antro.
                ~ A mouse does not rely on just one hole.-Plautus

                Non semper erit aestas
                ~ It will not always be summer.

                Comment


                • #9
                  That does look good. I will request it via interlibrary loan then buy it if it is as good as it looks.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here are some skills that are listed. How many skills do you have or might be able to learn?

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