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Odds & Ends you may need

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  • Odds & Ends you may need

    The loss of the ground prong from the plug of my 50 ft heavy duty outside extension cord sent me to the local hardware store to buy a replacement. As I entered my truck to return home a thought hit me. What if this had happened when in the middle of a power loss due to an ice storm and I needed to replace it? Given the terrain and roads from my house to the hardware store It very well may be impossible to make that trip. So there I sit with a generator & fuel but no cord to run to the one thing I need to keep running, say the fridge or freezer. I went back inside and bought 3 sets (plug and receptacle). I have 3 of these extension cords, one for everyday use, one dedicated for the generator and one just in case. So now I have replacements on hand in case of emergency. They are not hard to put on. With the right tools, about 5 - 10 min. With only a good sharp knife and a bit of patience It would take me about 15-20 min. Delicate work without a wire stripper to cut ONLY the rubber/plastic casing without severing more than one or two of the fine copper wires. Cut to many and you have to start over or risk overheating and thus really ruin either the cord, generator or fridge.
    Anything else anyone could think of like this that would you need to keep on hand, just in case? Things like replacement handles for shovels, hoes, axes, splitting malls, sledge hammers.

  • #2
    You couldn't be more right about having extra of some things. We have been going through stuff and found we really need to replace our tiller soon and also some of our old garden tools such as a new rake.. shovel etc. Our tiller is about 30 years old and not without some issues. Need to get it replaced before things happen.

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    • #3
      Z - plumbing items be it pipe, tubing fittings etc... if your house and property are old enough to have copper, you'll need copper pipe, fittings & valves (think if pipes pr valve freezes and busts. Or if you have PVC or PEX have those needs covered too. Maybe some spare electrical breakers, outlets & switches in case one shorts or just goes bad.
      I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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      • #4
        I've had to do a good bit of plumbing over the past 20 years. They now make replacement plumbing joints (Shark bite & others) that work on any pipe of that diameter by compression. No need for soldiering, gluing, etc. You can also get PEX pipe in the diameter of your plumbing to replace any possible breaks in the future as it's easy to install since it's flexible and withstands freezing (will expand up to 10X) better than any other plumbing. Just a thought.

        Dale
        Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

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        • #5
          Great point Dale. I hadn't mentioned them as they are on the pricey side but your spot on that they are quick and easy and PEX is definitely the way to go.
          I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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          • #6
            JB Weld...I like to keep on hand several of every kind of "flavor" they sell!

            https://www.jbweld.com/
            Genius is making a way out of no way.

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            • #7
              6 or 7 years ago I had a leak under the slab of the original part of the house. That part was plumbed with copper, but instead of using continuous runs they had a lot of elbow and other joints. Whoever did the original plumbing did a poor job.Was a load of fun breaking through the slab in 4 places to re-plumb. The plumber fished PEX through these 4 holes to the kitchen, 2 bathrooms and the utility room. As a result I do happen to have on hand repair kits for both sizes used (main line from well to house and in house).

              I do keep a couple of electrical switches and outlets on hand, the main part of the house was built in 1986 so some of these older switches and outlets are starting to wear out. Never thought about breakers. My electrical expertise is limited to replacing light fixtures, switches, outlets & fixing/replacing electrical cords. I know a lot of theory and have observed and helped with quite a number of different wiring tasks but frankly I have to much respect for the power of electricity to rely on myself to work on anything involving anything more complicated than what I have mentioned. Black to black, white to white and ground to ground pretty well covers what I am willing to tackle!

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              • #8
                Well and with this thread taking on more of the long term home maintenance items don't forget the roof. A gallon or 5 of roof cement, a bundle or 2 of shingles (matching color or not), or pieces of metal for those roofs should you have a windstorm or other mess up your roof, roof nails, tar paper or ice-gaurd, etc....

                Keep either a large heavy duty tarp or get a full or partial roll of house wrap; if a large area of roof is compromised you can cover the roof to help eliminate or at least minimize leaks.

                Also keep some tubes of silicon caulk around. good for windows, doors, tubs, sinks etc...

                Oh and Grizzy, I've found the Marine grade of JB does it about all and I love it as it will cure under or in water.
                Last edited by CountryGuy; 09-09-2018, 11:30 AM.
                I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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                • #9
                  Thanks, CG. Good to know!
                  Last edited by GrizzlyetteAdams; 09-09-2018, 02:39 PM.
                  Genius is making a way out of no way.

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