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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    Originally posted by OneBadPig View Post
    I wasnt going to mention sugar......but this salt thread reminds me that i should have long term supplies of cooking spices.
    50 lbs of Tony Chachere's;)
    I am a good cook. Probably chef level. Spices are muy importante!! I have Saffron, Pepper, and many other spices stored.

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  • OneBadPig
    replied
    I wasnt going to mention sugar......but this salt thread reminds me that i should have long term supplies of cooking spices.
    50 lbs of Tony Chachere's;)

    Leave a comment:


  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    Originally posted by PHR View Post
    Rusty...please don't mention sugar because there will be 4 pages of replies

    How about uses for sugar?

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  • PHR
    replied
    Rusty...please don't mention sugar because there will be 4 pages of replies

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  • Omegaman
    replied
    Good thing with living by the sea is that in bad times I could make seasalt if needed. And there is the fresh supply of sushi and seaweed:D

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  • lazer128
    replied
    Almost laughed RR...almost! :D

    Good stuff guys. Thanks!

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  • Ragnar Redbeard
    replied
    A tidbit of Salt History - Back in ancient Greece, when a person caused grief by his painful verbiage, he could be punished by being tortured with salt. The individual that was verbally injured, by Greek law, could have the person who hurt his feelings placed in large deep pits of salt.
    The greater the pain caused, the deeper the salt pit. The pure Grecian salt stung the individual unmercifully and caused great pain. By this person, hurting the feelings of another Greek, it was classified as a "verbal crime" worthy of being placed “in salt”, or “in salted”.
    Thus depending on the depth of the in salt, it could be termed as “deeply in salted”.

    The word was later coined by the murderous French monk Jacques Clement as Le In-Solti.
    The early English, mid 16th century, harshly translated this French terminology as the word insult or insulted.

    Note: All of this is of course made up, I know very little of salt and I just wanted to sound as knowledgeable as the rest you guys, I hope I did not “in salt” any of you.;)

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    Just some additional info, kelp and shellfish are good sources of natural iodine. I prefer good shrimp sushi, but that's me. Guaranteed no goiters here, just the chance of a double chin. :D

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    Goiters used to be a major problem among folks in areas where the soil was low in iodine. But, in general, peoples diets have changed. Not sure why they still put iodine in salt.

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  • kenno
    replied
    well I'm glad there was someone that knew what the heck Iodized salt was for!

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    Originally posted by kenno View Post
    I agree; The only reason to consume iodized salt is to prevent Gout, and I belive, Rickets. If I am correct both of these maladies can be prevented by consuming fresh fruits or veggies, Rose-hip tea, vitamins, as well as sea-weed/seafood and or fresh red meat or just plain old sea-salt.

    Nope. Iodine prevents Goiters. You can buy rock salt in the canning aisle of the store. Good for curing fish or meat. Make sure to remove fatty parts of the meat. It cures better. Also kills parasites and keeps bugs off the meat. Plus, a burger is just not a burger without salt and pepper.

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  • kenno
    replied
    I agree; The only reason to consume iodized salt is to prevent Gout, and I belive, Rickets. If I am correct both of these maladies can be prevented by consuming fresh fruits or veggies, Rose-hip tea, vitamins, as well as sea-weed/seafood and or fresh red meat or just plain old sea-salt.
    Last edited by kenno; 10-10-2008, 05:05 PM.

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  • TheUnboundOne
    replied
    Kenno, Thanks for the added bits of knowledge on the subject. Although I haven't yet totally kicked the fast-food habit, one thing I always do (in addition to ordering from the value menu) is to pick up extra condiments, including salt. Those things pile up big after a while.

    :)

    One thing I wouldn't get, however, is iodized salt. The stuff makes food smell and taste like motor oil to my palate, and with a proper diet, isn't even necessary. Pure salt is best hands down.

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  • kenno
    replied
    The latin word 'salary' is derived from the word salt. Large quanities of salt are required for curing meat and canning some other foods. Bulk corse ground salt is available through feed stores packaged in paper 20 lb, or larger bags place these bags inside plastic bags to protect from moisture and leakage.

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  • TheUnboundOne
    replied
    Diesel, I should add, Mayor Johnston on Jericho confirmed what I previously read about the Romans using salt as currency.

    Jericho is not only a fantastically entertaining series, but it's good to take notes from as well. You can get a smattering of history as well as some techniques from the show as well.

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