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Cold weather gear marketing (rant)

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  • prkchp76
    replied
    Originally posted by methusaleh View Post
    Thanks for reading folks.

    You get what you pay for, and when it comes to life being at stake, I believe that absolutely no expense should be spared. Quality gear might have an initial cost offset of anywhere from three to perhaps ten or twenty times as much as low-end gear, however in the long run, survival gear is perhaps the #1 topic in existence where the saying "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" comes into play. Pay $50 for a cheap insulated jacket at a department store, or pay $400 for a North Face or Arcteryx.....one survival situation later, or a few years later, and you would thank yourself for doing your homework and spending more to get a quality piece of gear.
    ok i agree up to the north face point i like'm but i cant see the usefullness in a north face versus a true carhart chore coat unless maybe as an under garment hey thx for the idea

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  • Big_Saw
    replied
    Thanx 4 the bump....I hadn't seen this thread, and I agree 100%....commercialization and cheap mass-production have killed quality in the clothing and gear market....even good money can't buy decent gear, unless one really pays attention and does their research....

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  • methusaleh
    replied
    Bumping this thread for awareness during the holiday shopping season...

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  • methusaleh
    replied
    Thanks for reading folks.

    You get what you pay for, and when it comes to life being at stake, I believe that absolutely no expense should be spared. Quality gear might have an initial cost offset of anywhere from three to perhaps ten or twenty times as much as low-end gear, however in the long run, survival gear is perhaps the #1 topic in existence where the saying "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure" comes into play. Pay $50 for a cheap insulated jacket at a department store, or pay $400 for a North Face or Arcteryx.....one survival situation later, or a few years later, and you would thank yourself for doing your homework and spending more to get a quality piece of gear.

    Leave a comment:


  • prkchp76
    replied
    Woooo thank god i shop at k mart and target had me scared for a minute

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  • HileTroy
    replied
    It is an education session for those who may not be up on this knowledge. I didn't read this as some rant. I get all my extreme cold weather gear from WalMart. Just kidding. Here in the Northwest we have REI stores to shop in. Expensive stuff, but it works. I was an avid mountaineer here on the cascade volcanoes and good clothing is like good gear. Generally you get what you pay for. -30 degree wind chills on Top of Mt Rainier makes you rely on your cold weather gear and knowledge. I think this was a good post.

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  • methusaleh
    started a topic Cold weather gear marketing (rant)

    Cold weather gear marketing (rant)

    Yes yes yes I know, who wants to read another rant? If we wanted to read rants, we would read blogs and seek them out. Well I am ranting here, to you all, in hopes of perhaps gaining some support or learning where I may be right or wrong. It is also a good time of year to approach this topic, as some of our loved ones may be shopping for cold weather gear and we need to tell them what NOT to purchase.

    I'm a jack of many trades, master of a few. But one area I believe I know pretty darn well is cold weather preparedness. Growing up in New England, serving in the MA Army National Guard in both MP and Infantry roles, and eventually with the 10th Mountain Division, I have had my fair share of cold weather training and education. However I am by no means an expert. That's where your opinions come in.

    This thread is not meant to educate about what you should do for cold weather, rather to explore what not to do and what not to purchase.

    What really grinds my gears is how certain so-called "cold weather gear" is marketed toward the ignorant consumer, and how misleading advertising could someday lead to injury or death of someone relying on said gear.

    Prime examples...the myriad cheap items, such as thick socks, sweaters, and gloves, that are made of some mixture of cotton and acrylic, and are being marketed as "Thermal Cold Gear" or something of that nature. AFAIK the winter weather mantra "cotton kills" has not changed-- especially when it's next to the skin in an enclosed space like a boot or glove! And even so, cotton and acrylic are not known for their insulating properties anyhow! Acrylic, I believe, also presents a greater hazard of melting if brought too close to a stove or campfire, compared to many other substances woven into clothing or gear. Cotton retains moisture and is just a poor choice for insulation anyhow.

    Speaking of gloves...sure it is nice to have a textured palm for grip, but at what cost? Some of the junk I've seen in mass merchandising stores has stitching so wide and so poor on the palm grip area, that it is sure to easily come off once it even begins to peel, not to mention stiffen up and crack or break off in cold or when exposed to salt or chemicals. Same things goes for gloves with synthetic or untreated leather.

    Another area that bothers me is cheap footwear. Anything that bears a visual resemblence to wool is used to line a boot and seems to make it automatically some "Arctic Wear" type marketing scheme. Fluffed chemical fiber or cotton is all that is is! Better than an unlined boot, but dangerous to rely on for true insulation in the cold. Boots with any kind of remotely knobby-looking tread being touted for its grip-- when the material in the sole matters just as much-- if not more-- as the tread pattern! (Yes I am a backpacker who is extremely picky about such things, so I know about sole material and treads.) Not to mention all of the brands that will not even quote the material name and weight used in constructing a boot, when it comes to insulation. I'm a man who measures things in grams of Thinsulate, so that is important to me. Although we must not forget the major role that socks play in cold weather survival. Personally I prefer a balance of a moderate weight of insulation combined with a shoe roomy enough for me to vary between one and two pairs of socks with liners. Some folks, like my fiance, prefer a heavier boot with just one pair of the thinner Smartwool socks and liners.

    I digress...this is a rant and not an education session...comments?
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