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freezing and thawing fresh egg plant

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  • RICHFL
    replied
    You know you can CON it using the same water bath that you use for all other vegetables.

    If canning you can make everything from a sauce to go with it to a eggplant soup. It will last for a maximum of 3 years if kept in a cool dark place. How long in a freezer with no power?

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  • Applejack
    replied
    I made 4 pans of eggplant parmasan and froze it. Hubby and the grandkids love it.
    AJ

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  • Chefsimms
    replied
    Egg plant is kind of hard to keep from turning brown,so another good way is to make egg plant parmsen or Ratatouille , and just freeze thank

    I will but a Ratatouille recipe in the recipe thread.

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  • Chefsimms
    replied
    I blanch everything before I freeze it; I put a little acid (Vinegar, white wine, lemon juice etc…) in the water with a little salt after it comes to a boil. Once the water has come to a boil I put the product in the boiling water, wait for it to come back to boil and then boil it for 2 minutes. Remove it from the boiling water and shock it so that it stops cooking. (Shock it = submerge it in ice water) Then put it in your freezer bags Lay the bags on a sheet pan flat till they are frozen. That way they will stack real well in your freezer.

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  • Applejack
    replied
    use lemon juice on the egg plant after you blanch them and they will never turn black. I always use lemon juice for things like this that I am going to freeze and have never had a problem.
    AJ

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  • Lil Bear
    replied
    I like reading old posts. Seems like I learn something new all the time. Thanks guys for the info. I am having the same problems with my squash. Will know better next time. Do you guys role any of your stuff in flour etc before freezing?

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  • rsanders
    replied
    Originally posted by Mungo View Post
    We find that after blanching, we lay the peices out on a cookie sheet and freeze them separated. Then vacuum seal them. This prevents them from becoming a big pile of mush when thawing. This method works with many vegetables and berries too.
    I've been vacuum packing for a few years now,and I finally figured out this spring, what you just said about the freezing. It makes it go so much smoother when what ever your packing is flat and frozen. I've only had the vacuum packer for about five years now,so it didn't take too long to catch on.:D

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  • Mungo
    replied
    We find that after blanching, we lay the peices out on a cookie sheet and freeze them separated. Then vacuum seal them. This prevents them from becoming a big pile of mush when thawing. This method works with many vegetables and berries too.

    Leave a comment:


  • BARRACUDABILLY
    replied
    Thanks for the help, very usefull info

    I guess I will just have to fry up what I have frozen now and will
    add this to my "lessons learned" but at least I grew it my self and I am
    still learning.

    Thanks again

    BB

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  • The Oracle
    replied
    Usually you need to blanch it for about 2 minutes ( put them in a cold bath after blanching to stop the process) . You can add what ever spices you want to the water. Potatoes need blanching before you dehydrate them or they'll turn black.

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  • BARRACUDABILLY
    replied
    Thanks Oricle,

    How long do I need to "blanch" it? and should I use just water or add any salt and pepper to the blanch?

    And as a follow up, last night the wife fried the blackened egg plant and it lightened up and tasted fine, down right tastey!

    BB

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  • The Oracle
    replied
    You need to blanch it before you vacuum pack it

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  • BARRACUDABILLY
    started a topic freezing and thawing fresh egg plant

    freezing and thawing fresh egg plant

    I need some help, I harvested and cut up some egg plant, vacuum sealed the bags and put them in the freezer. All was well and I was proud.

    This weekend I thought I would thaw a pack out and eat some, The eggplant was still just as beautiful as the day I froze it but as it thawed it got dark and fiannly turned black dark black THE INSIDE PART.

    I cooked it and it did taste ok, I ate three pieces before I thought I had better ask around. the wife would not touch it!

    What did I do wrong or is it ok? I have like 24 quarts of frozen egg plant put up. I usually grill it, this time I used the George Foreman and sometimes I just fry it.

    Thanks for any help

    BB
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