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  • Longer-Term Food Storage

    I came across this site and thought it may help some people who are just starting out with prepping..

    http://providentliving.org/content/d...4224-1,00.html

    Longer-Term Storage—30 Years or More

    Properly packaged, low-moisture foods stored at room temperature or cooler (75°F/24°C or lower) remain nutritious and edible much longer than previously thought according to findings of recent scientific studies. Estimated shelf life for many products has increased to 30 years or more (see chart for new estimates of shelf life). Previous estimates of longevity were based on "best-if-used-by" recommendations and experience. Though not studied, sugar, salt, baking soda (essential for soaking beans), and vitamin C in tablet form also store well long-term. Some basic foods do need more frequent rotation, such as vegetable oil every 1 to 2 years.

    While there is a decline in nutritional quality and taste over time, depending on the original quality of food and how it was processed, packaged, and stored, the studies show that even after being stored long-term, the food will help sustain life in an emergency.

    New "Life Sustaining" Shelf-Life
    Estimates (In Years)

    Wheat 30+
    White rice 30+
    Corn 30+
    Sugar 30+
    Pinto beans 30
    Rolled oats 30
    Pasta 30
    Potato flakes 30
    Apple slices 30
    Non-fat powdered milk 20
    Dehydrated carrots 20

  • #2
    Tooo cool!
    "If Howdy Doody runs against him, I'm voting for the puppet." - SkyOwl's Wife, 2012

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    • #3
      Thanks! On the potato flakes, do you leave in the seal can or do you vacuum seal in smaller bags?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Lil Bear View Post
        Thanks! On the potato flakes, do you leave in the seal can or do you vacuum seal in smaller bags?
        Hey Bear! The potato flakes in the #10 cans I leave as is.. For the larger containers, I do split it up into vacuum bags and then toss into a bucket. :)

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        • #5
          This is really great news Oz! Thank you! I had worried about this kind of stuff.
          Your opponet got stronger today, did you?
          {{unswydd-Of One Purpose}}

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Lostinoz View Post
            For the larger containers, I do split it up into vacuum bags and then toss into a bucket. :)
            That's how I do it too :).
            "If Howdy Doody runs against him, I'm voting for the puppet." - SkyOwl's Wife, 2012

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            • #7
              Where do you get your mylar bags and oxygen absorbers from? (I'm going cross eyed from an internet search on the dang things after watching that video of dehydrating! lol)

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              • #8
                Oxygen absorbers = http://www.sorbentsystems.com/order_...FQkzawod-SIJoA

                Mylar bags for 5 gal buckets = https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/e...orage_bags.htm

                5 gallon buckets = http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/pro...roduct_id=9715

                Don't forget the lids = http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/var...iant%5Fid=2287
                As Zombie Axe would say...
                "Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty."

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                • #9
                  Thank you so much! Just placed an order. Got the buckets this weekend in town, just needed the mylar and h2o absorbers to go with it.:)

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                  • #10
                    What do you use to seal the mylar bags, or can you just pinch closed and fold over?

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                    • #11
                      I'm going to use my food saver for the smaller bags and an iron for the larger bags. I don't thin a clip would work since the idea is to have an airtight seal.

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                      • #12
                        [I'm going to use my food saver for the smaller bags and an iron for the larger bags. I don't thin a clip would work since the idea is to have an airtight seal.]

                        Duct tape? Saves havin to scrape all that scorched plastic offin the iron.
                        O.W.
                        Things are seldom what they seem.

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                        • #13
                          use a linen type towel or "pressing cloth" and there will be no scorched plastic. I also shelled out $15 bucks at the craft store for a heating iron for a project I was doing. It's small and will heat at hot as an iron and it's made for sealing stuff.

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                          • #14
                            Oh.....:o
                            O.W.
                            Things are seldom what they seem.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Lil Bear View Post
                              What do you use to seal the mylar bags, or can you just pinch closed and fold over?
                              I utilize the Wife's steam iron set to just below max setting. I iron the bag shut with a constantly moving iron. Have not had aanyting stick to the iron in over 60 bags sealed thus far.
                              As Zombie Axe would say...
                              "Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty."

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