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  • Vacuum Packing

    Just want to share a little on vacuum packing. I have used several machines, my current being Foodsaver V2480. What I like about it versus earlier cheaper models is the vacuum port is in the lid instead of the bottom channel. Liquid can't get sucked into pump. The lower channel has removable tray making clean up a snap. For large jobs it is not continuous duty like a $4000.00 commercial unit. When heat strip has too much built up heat it won't cycle until it cools off. Good idea, because if you try to vacuum on hot strip, it will soften and collapse bag channels and start sealing because it is no longer pulling air from bag. No problem, go fix a drink, take a break then start again. However if this is not your forte, and in a hurry to "git er done" keep a bowl with a couple of ice cubes handy. After each cycle, slide ice cube across heat strip 3-4 times and you have a continuous duty vacuum sealer. Now for how it really preserves food. A few years ago I catered my step-daughters wedding at her dad's place in Eastern Oklahoma mountains 400 miles from Houston. I served brisket, ribs, and chicken, pit cooked in Houston, Sliced and cut ready to serve, in 3-4 lb, packages. Also potato salad with mayonnaise and boiled eggs vacuum packed in 5# packages. All was iced down in coolers immediately after packaging. I fed over 100 people and all I had to carry was 3 ice chests, large pot, and propane burner. Pot full of water on burner, drop bags in simmering water few minutes, and constant supply of fresh barbecue without any hassle on site. Now for the value of vacuum packing for longevity, I purposely did an experiment. I came home with bag of potato salad and rack of ribs. I kept in refrigerator for about 7 weeks. Sunday morning I put on pot of beans, opened potato salad and ate four big spoonfuls thinking if it was off, it would show before evening meal and placed anybody else at risk. Tasted like fresh made and chilled, with no ill effects. Supper of ribs potato salad and beans like I had slaved all day.
    If at first, you don't succeed, suck harder.

  • #2
    Good info, Maddog. Hadn't thought of using the "sucker" that way. When we go camping, I do my rib pre-cook and then freeze them so when we get to camp, they are ready to BBQ. I seal those in baggies. Will use the sucker next time!
    "If Howdy Doody runs against him, I'm voting for the puppet." - SkyOwl's Wife, 2012

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    • #3
      I was looking at that Model (V2480), found one new for $70 +ship... good deal? Also, I look for fresh meat deals at the grocer... Is it feasible to place the raw meat in a vacuum bag with marinade, seal it up, then freeze... will the vacuum decrease the marinade time, so that by the time it freezes it is marinated enough? Take it out, thaw and cook when ready?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by hubste5 View Post
        Is it feasible to place the raw meat in a vacuum bag with marinade, seal it up, then freeze... will the vacuum decrease the marinade time, so that by the time it freezes it is marinated enough? Take it out, thaw and cook when ready?
        I don't know about decreasing the time, but when we go camping and we are having Korean Ribs (bulgogi), I put all the goodies into the bag with the raw meat and freeze it. Get some of the prep out of the way ahead of time, that way. When I thaw them out for the BBQ, they are awesome.

        Have done this with steaks and ribs, too.
        "If Howdy Doody runs against him, I'm voting for the puppet." - SkyOwl's Wife, 2012

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        • #5
          Originally posted by hubste5 View Post
          I was looking at that Model (V2480), found one new for $70 +ship... good deal? Also, I look for fresh meat deals at the grocer... Is it feasible to place the raw meat in a vacuum bag with marinade, seal it up, then freeze... will the vacuum decrease the marinade time, so that by the time it freezes it is marinated enough? Take it out, thaw and cook when ready?
          $70.00 is excellent deal. No longer sold by Tilia, new (not necessarily better) models replaced it. Marketing. You can season, spice, or marinate before freezing. With liquid marinade you need a model that has wet seal option. The V2480 does. It simply heats longer to seal the wet plastic. Be sure to hit seal button as soon as liquid approaches end of bag. Some machines on the market come with instructions to freeze any product with moisture prior to vacuuming. Their inferior design allows liquid entering the vacuum chamber to go straight into pump effectively destroying it. Tilia also sells canisters for freezer or shelf storage. Also an attachment to vacuum seal canning jars for storage containers. Great for true cold pack pickled okra, green beans, or bread and butter pickles. However these have to be kept refrigerated always. Also economical way to pantry store bulk beans, rice, cereal, etc. Use what you need and re-seal. Allows bulk buying and long term freshness. Put 75 lbs of fresh fryers and 52 lbs of bone in center cut pork loin sawn in various thicknesses for frying and grilling chops in freezer yesterday.
          Last edited by maddog37jad; 05-17-2009, 12:52 AM. Reason: Spelling error
          If at first, you don't succeed, suck harder.

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          • #6
            Thanks for the info, waited to long on the 2480-- sold out. I did pick up a different (lesser?) model for $54... V2050. Hope it works OK. It does come with many of the same options as the other model. I just want to start out with dry rice/beans, buy bulk and break down into family sized portions, so I think it will work fine for that (and at that price, they will likely sell out quickly). Thanks for the help!

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