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Food processing for quality of life

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  • maddog37jad
    replied
    Some web sites of interest

    Now that I have enough posts to post URL's, the first is to Allied Kenco catalog that caters to the home butcher This is direct link to cure #1. I prefer this with canning salt versus Morton Tender Quick as canning salt is available most anywhere. A pound of cure #1 will do a lot of meat. A must in brine cures and sausage production that will be cold smoked. Not necessary if cooked or frozen immediately. Fortunately the store is local to me. On the other hand it might be better if it wasn't to handy. I wander around and find things I need that I didn't know I needed.

    http://www.alliedkenco.com/catalog/p...oducts_id/1467

    http://www.dizzypigbbq.com/recipesHam.html

    The second is my source for ham cure recipe. I also use for fresh pork bellies to bacon. Bacon is 5 days in brine without injecting, Turn more often as thin flat meat tends to seal against container preventing contact with brine. The critical ingredients are salt, sugar, and cure. Recommend following recipe first time. My personal modification is doubling the pickling spice and garlic, and replacing 1 cup of sugar with "Grandma's Molasses". The fun is experimenting with different herbs and spices and developing your own signature recipe. Start small with 1/2 boneless pork loin. Inject lightly, brine 5 days in refrigerator, and cook outside over indirect heat or oven. Voila, you have Canadian Bacon. Better than deli, 1/4 the price. With all brine cured meats, the longer you soak in clear water after the cure & the more often you change water, the more salt you will draw from meat.

    http://schmidling.com/polsaus.htm

    This is link to my favorite sausage. Explore the site. Many recipes and a wealth of info on sausage making in general.

    Any questions, feel free to ask.

    Check pictures in album in my profile. More to follow, 1/3 acre garden, equipment, some homemade.
    Last edited by maddog37jad; 05-02-2009, 03:03 PM.

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  • Brosia
    replied
    awesome info maddog. With all the recent problems with salmonella, melamine, goodness knows what else- doing it yourself is probably the only way to ensure your family is eating safe food.

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  • Lostinoz
    replied
    Wonderful! Thanks Maddog! Printing this out to keep!! :D

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  • maddog37jad
    replied
    Home cured ham and bacon recipe

    See attachment for basic ham & bacon brine recipe. Skin ham and remove as much surface fat as possible.Make sure ham and brine are 37-38 degrees. Inject the ham with strained brine solution be sure to inject thoroughly around bone,use about 3 cups for 18-20 pound ham. My personal modifications are replace one cup of brown sugar with 12 oz. jar of "Grandma's Molasses". Before glazing and cooking take ham or bacon from brine and hose off to remove spice solids if desired and soak in tapwater for two hours change water and soak two more hours. This will keep ham from being too salty, don't worry, your ham is cured and should be at room temperature prior to cooking anyway. For glaze I use my 84 year old Mom's traditional recipe. 1 part honey to one part "Heinz 57 Steak sauce". I inject the cured ham with all it will hold and brush the outside. I cook it on my large pit with external firebox(no direct heat) at 250 degrees. Plan on 5-8 hours. I turn and baste every 20 minutes. When it reaches 135 Degrees internal, I double wrap in heavy duty foil. It has not broken and lost any juice yet and has plenty of smoke. Cook sealed to internal of 165 degrees and remove from heat. The temp will continue to rise. I prefer to leave sealed and cool to room temp for several hours. Take particular care to not puncture the bottom of foil. Slice into large container. If you like a ham bone in your bean pot, leave enough meat on bone to make it worth your while. Take the jelly in bottom of foil and distribute it through sliced meat. The mixture of glaze, brine and natural ham juices is just short of heaven, and no one will ever accuse you of serving dry ham again. I vacuum pack and freeze in meal sized packages. Vacuum bags are microwave and boiling safe. Straight from freezer to microwave or poaching pot. (Not rolling boil.) Good as fresh cooked. No need to puncture bag, as vacuum pack has plenty of room for expansion. Since I do 20 lb. range hams, 5 gallon plastic igloo water cans are perfect. Just turn everyday to keep meat from sealing against plastic and not absorbing cure. Critical issues: Brine and meat at 37-38 degrees before placing in brine. Get reliable thermometer. Below 36 degrees, curing stops. 40 degrees and plus, danger of spoilage. Same recipe for bacon cure, only 5 days and no injection.(Thin layer of meat)Turn bacon twice a day. Flat meat has more tendency to seal against container. I cold smoke my bacon slabs at 120 Degrees for 5 hours, then chill thoroughly before slicing. Bacon and sausage should be hung at room temperature for 2-3 hours before placing on smoker. Hand dry surface as much as possible, fan helps drying. This gives time for pellicle to form (protein sheen) and allow smoke to penetrate. I got seriously into this a little over a year ago and would not consider eating store bought again. Not just for the quality control, but the mega difference in flavor. Share with friends and relatives and the response is universal-WOW. Amazing the number of people who would love to partake but refuse to get off their rump and do it. It is fairly labor intensive but well worth it in my opinion. I would not dream at showing up at family gatherings without an ice chest of something, as everybody is wondering what Rick is bringing this time. Got to go check on my keg of naturally fermenting sauerkraut.
    Attached Files

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  • Lostinoz
    replied
    Originally posted by maddog37jad View Post
    It was. Diesel cured my ignorance. Starting to learn how to navigate. When I get my camera back from my brother, will post equipment pictures. Hopefully that will generate both questions and self explanatory answers.
    Maddog37jad
    That will be great! I would like to learn to cure my own bacon and ham. :)

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  • maddog37jad
    replied
    It was. Diesel cured my ignorance. Starting to learn how to navigate. When I get my camera back from my brother, will post equipment pictures. Hopefully that will generate both questions and self explanatory answers.
    Maddog37jad

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  • Lostinoz
    replied
    Originally posted by maddog37jad View Post
    My survival focus is a little different than most. My main interest is processing most of the food my family eats myself. My primary tools are homemade smoking cabinet, meat grinder / sausage stuffer, meat slicer, a used 2 door soft drink cooler, cheap meat band saw and non self defrosting upright freezers, and vacuum bagging machine. My primary source of meat is wholesale distributor. Most if not all will sell to public in case lots with at least 100 pound purchase for cash. I pay what the grocery stores pay and it is in my truck on the way home in less time than delivery trucks can get it to the store. Who knows what goes on behind closed doors as bulk packaged meats are parted for packaging in display counter. My concerns are sanitation practices, temperature control and age in display for peak freshness. The soft drink cooler is perfect at 37 degrees for holding bulk as it is being processed. Small quantities are out at a time and immediately returned in stages of processing. Perfect for brine curing hams for 10 days, bacon for 5 days. Holds smoked sausage and bacon till sliced, vacuum packed and frozen. When not in use it is unplugged with doors open saving electricity. Not like a refrigerator, it will cool down to 37 degrees in 20 minutes. Pit cooked cured hams are sliced, vacuumed, and frozen in meal sized packets. Like fresh cooked. They claim vacuumed meats will store for 3+ years. Can't vouch for that, never lasts. I vary my inventory to prevent monotony. Non defrosting freezers at or below 0 degrees are important for long term storage. Self defrosters work by partially thawing, drying the air and refreezing. Perfectly ok for kitchen ref/freezer where you have small quantities. By processing my own I know the quality of meat, lack of fillers, and additives. The only thing I use that isn't natural spice is sodium nitrate. It is a MUST for curing or cold smoking. Prevents growth of botulism. Without it, you might get lucky, but eventually you will serve a deadly feast. For truly special, there is the annual deer, and year round trapping of feral hogs. I also have a large vegetable garden underway. If any one is interested in recipes, techniques, or advice, post back here and I will post for all to see. The only equipment I purchased retail was grinder and band saw. Everything else was a "deal" on eBay or Craig's List.
    Maddog, this is great!! I would love more information. I think you would get a greater response if you posted this under Food and Water or even the DIY threads on the board. :) Very good info here!

    Ok, nevermind, I have lost my mind. I thought this was posted under the rules and reg thread. :( Carry on luv!

    Leave a comment:


  • maddog37jad
    started a topic Food processing for quality of life

    Food processing for quality of life

    My survival focus is a little different than most. My main interest is processing most of the food my family eats myself. My primary tools are homemade smoking cabinet, meat grinder / sausage stuffer, meat slicer, a used 2 door soft drink cooler, cheap meat band saw and non self defrosting upright freezers, and vacuum bagging machine. My primary source of meat is wholesale distributor. Most if not all will sell to public in case lots with at least 100 pound purchase for cash. I pay what the grocery stores pay and it is in my truck on the way home in less time than delivery trucks can get it to the store. Who knows what goes on behind closed doors as bulk packaged meats are parted for packaging in display counter. My concerns are sanitation practices, temperature control and age in display for peak freshness. The soft drink cooler is perfect at 37 degrees for holding bulk as it is being processed. Small quantities are out at a time and immediately returned in stages of processing. Perfect for brine curing hams for 10 days, bacon for 5 days. Holds smoked sausage and bacon till sliced, vacuum packed and frozen. When not in use it is unplugged with doors open saving electricity. Not like a refrigerator, it will cool down to 37 degrees in 20 minutes. Pit cooked cured hams are sliced, vacuumed, and frozen in meal sized packets. Like fresh cooked. They claim vacuumed meats will store for 3+ years. Can't vouch for that, never lasts. I vary my inventory to prevent monotony. Non defrosting freezers at or below 0 degrees are important for long term storage. Self defrosters work by partially thawing, drying the air and refreezing. Perfectly ok for kitchen ref/freezer where you have small quantities. By processing my own I know the quality of meat, lack of fillers, and additives. The only thing I use that isn't natural spice is sodium nitrate. It is a MUST for curing or cold smoking. Prevents growth of botulism. Without it, you might get lucky, but eventually you will serve a deadly feast. For truly special, there is the annual deer, and year round trapping of feral hogs. I also have a large vegetable garden underway. If any one is interested in recipes, techniques, or advice, post back here and I will post for all to see. The only equipment I purchased retail was grinder and band saw. Everything else was a "deal" on eBay or Craig's List.
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