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  • Thermos Cooking

    Here's an idea. Want to save cooking fuel in the field? Once you get your water to the boiling point turn off your stove. Put your rice/noodles along with your dehydrated food stuffs, tuna, lentils, seasonings etc into your thermos. Put enough water into the Thermos to be absorbed by the food plus a little extra water. Seal the Thermos. As you are traveling your next meal is cooking away and ready for you at your next stop. Drain excess water and enjoy.:)

    Please chime in with any other ideas or recipes for this way of cooking.
    Last edited by Bayou Blaster; 03-23-2009, 09:50 AM.

  • #2
    Dang! Now I gotta go buy a thermos!

    Good idea, especially when you're on the move and need to stay that way.
    The 12ga.... It's not just for rabbits anymore.

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    • #3
      Running heavy equipment in the winter I have cooked food by wraping it in foil or those one use aluminum pans and putting it on the block or mannifold in the morning and by lunch a nice hot meal. I know guys who snow mobile who do the same thing and my grandfather said they use to do the same thing with the old model A fords.

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      • #4
        I'm leary if the thermos is lined with plastic.
        The chemicals leach into your blood stream
        and cause infetility. Just sayin' . . .

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Moira View Post
          I'm leary if the thermos is lined with plastic.
          The chemicals leach into your blood stream
          and cause infetility. Just sayin' . . .
          There are Thermos containers that are currently being manufactured out of stainless steel for the inner (food/beverage) container. I know that Stanely makes them. You can still find Thermos products out there made of glass. Additionally food grade plastics DO NOT use toxic release agents in the molds during the manufacturing process. I think the issue you are refering too concerns a news item almost a year old now concerning infant feeding bottles. Thoses bottles were leaching out chemicals in the high heat of a dishwasher which after prolong exposure was of concern to infant/child development. Some water bottles and sippy cups were also found with this problem. Run a search concerning Bisphenol A or BPA free polycorbonate products. Good on you to be concerned.;) Unfortunately even the air we breath today is not healthy.

          Here's one Link

          http://www.fox47.com/artman/publish/printer_364.shtml

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          • #6
            Bayou Blaster,

            I've had many a meal this way and the Thermos is an excellent method of cooking.

            Many Eastern Europeans also would make stews with a similar method that doesn't involve a Thermos, but the same basic idea.

            They would cut up and portion any meats, vegetables, and seasonings they had on hand, put them in a pot with just enough boiling water to cover them, cover the pot with a lid, put the pot in a wooden box, fill the space between the box and the pot with newspaper, then cover the pot lid with more papers, then cover the papers with the wooden box lid. The newspapers and the wooden box would store in the heat of the pot for several hours and when the people got back from a hard day's work, they had a delicious stew.

            (I've also heard that as long as you keep boiling water in the pot, the contents never go bad. Personally, though, I would think it would be too easy to forget about the pot on very busy days, though, so I wouldn't want to risk a case of food poisoning by storing things longer than a day's time.)
            Last edited by TheUnboundOne; 03-24-2009, 12:39 AM. Reason: Removing redundancy and adding punctuation.
            "Apocalypse is by no means inevitable." --Jim Rice.

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            • #7
              Moira,

              Bayou Blaster is right. I stand by the Stanley Stainless Steel Thermos with the wide neck for hot meals, and the narrow-necked version for both hot and cold drinks.

              In addition to food and drink storage, Stanley Stainless Steel Thermoses are also hard enough to make great blunt instrument weapons. Woe to the one who gets hit by one of those bad boys!

              :D
              "Apocalypse is by no means inevitable." --Jim Rice.

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