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  • Food Rationing

    I came across this on one of the FB groups I'm in. Now I've seen it before but I think this helps keep in perspective what (depending on your age) our Great grandparents, grandparents or parents went thru during WW2.

    Can you imagine how this sort of govt mandated restrictions would go over today, especially from the left and the freeloaders in society. How do you think the left would react when they finally realize that with all the millions of illegals being here and standing in line with their hands out are taking food from their and their families mouths. How long do you think it'd take them to flip their script on fairness?

    Honestly there is no way this could be implemented today as people would loose their minds rather than tighten their belts, cut back, start a garden, have chickens, rabbits etc...

    Last edited by CountryGuy; 08-04-2018, 10:37 AM.
    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

  • #2
    I talked to my mom about this. Her family lived on a farm so they grew their own food plus grand dad was very good hunter for deer, moose, bear, etc. Plus there was a major river near by for fishing.

    Since it was a self supporting farm with a family of 11, they did not have rationing imposed except for gas and tires.

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    • #3
      It would be interesting to translate the list into calories. One ounce of cheese, and four ounces of bacon per week doesn't sound like enough food to keep a mouse alive.

      CG: You are so right. Ration isn't even in anybody's vocabulary anymore. There would be riots for every morsel. We turned into a " Let me get mine " society a long time ago.
      The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

      Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

      Comment


      • #4
        Brought to us by the friendly personal space invaders at Google...

        2 oz of Jam = 159 cal
        8 oz of Sugar = 887 cal
        4 oz butter = 815 cal
        4 oz margarine = 815 cal
        2 oz of Lard = 509 cal
        1 oz of cheese = 114 cal
        4 oz of Bacon = 610 cal
        1 egg = 78 cal (fortnight = 14 days) so divided by 2 that only contributes 39 cal per week
        1 onion = 44 cal
        1 pound of beef = 585 cal
        (I don't quite get how much meat they are saying, is it to be a pound? I assumed yes)
        1 can of Spam = 1080 cal

        Grand total = 5657/ person/ week
        so per day/ person = 808 calories

        Now just Googling, it says an average woman needs around 2000 cal per day to maintain weight, 1500 cal to loose 1lb per week. An average man needs 2500 to maintain and 2000 to loose.

        "Calories When Starving. The lowest recommended caloric intake for women and men is 1,200 and 1,500 calories, respectively. According to the National Institutes of Health's Medline Plus, a diet of 500 to 800 calories a day is dangerously too low and should not be done unless its a medically supervised diet.Nov 25, 2010"

        So if a family couldn't substitute fruit, veg or wild game the above weekly ration was barely enough to keep people alive and likely they would have been in a weak and ineffective state.
        Last edited by CountryGuy; 08-06-2018, 08:32 PM.
        I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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        • #5
          Out of curiosity thought I'd check some items one might find on a homestead or farm...
          So just seeing what having some of the following items available to an individual each week would add in caloric intake (I assumed a 1/4 of the chicken, 2 quail, 3 potatoes & 3 carrots in my summation) the following:

          1 Qt of raw goats milk = 673 cal (same cal if made into cheese)
          1 gal of raw cows milk = 2560 cal
          1 whole roasted chicken = 2,140 cal (1/4 = 535 cal)
          (additional cal available from bone/ soup stock)
          1 quail = 123 ( x2 = 246 cal)
          1 rabbit = 617 cal/ lb of meat
          1 potato = 163 cal - 114 in a sweet potato ( x3 = 489 cal)
          1 carrot = 40 cal ( x3 = 120 cal)

          Totals = 5240/ week or 749 cal/ day

          So the ration amount of 808 cal / day + the additional 749 cal/ day from the farm would give a person 1557 cal per day which is still in the range of loosing a pound per week.


          I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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          • #6
            I guess obesity was not a big issue.
            One day you eat the chicken.....next day the left-over chicken.....next five days you eat chicken feathers, head and feet.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by CountryGuy View Post
              Brought to us by the friendly personal space invaders at Google...

              2 oz of Jam = 159 cal
              8 oz of Sugar = 887 cal
              4 oz butter = 815 cal
              4 oz margarine = 815 cal
              2 oz of Lard = 509 cal
              1 oz of cheese = 114 cal
              4 oz of Bacon = 610 cal
              1 egg = 78 cal (fortnight = 14 days) so divided by 2 that only contributes 39 cal per week
              1 onion = 44 cal
              1 pound of beef = 585 cal
              (I don't quite get how much meat they are saying, is it to be a pound? I assumed yes)
              1 can of Spam = 1080 cal

              Grand total = 5657/ person/ week
              so per day/ person = 808 calories

              Now just Googling, it says an average woman needs around 2000 cal per day to maintain weight, 1500 cal to loose 1lb per week. An average man needs 2500 to maintain and 2000 to loose.

              "Calories When Starving. The lowest recommended caloric intake for women and men is 1,200 and 1,500 calories, respectively. According to the National Institutes of Health's Medline Plus, a diet of 500 to 800 calories a day is dangerously too low and should not be done unless its a medically supervised diet.Nov 25, 2010"

              So if a family couldn't substitute fruit, veg or wild game the above weekly ration was barely enough to keep people alive and likely they would have been in a weak and ineffective state.

              I think if most women went on a 2000 cal per day diet, they'd all be 400 lbs.. The number of calories you need is based upon your weight and your metabolism.
              The average person of average weight, regardless of male or female, needs about 10 calories per pound.. So a 200 lb person would require about 2000 calories a day. A 150 pound person requires 1500 calories per day.

              This assumes a person who is only moderately active with a moderate metabolism.

              A person who lives in an apartment who watches television most of the time would only require about 7 or 8 calories per pound per day.. For a slow metabolism, probably 7.. for a fast metabolism, probably 8.

              A rough carpenter, roofer, or someone who does hard physical labor, requires about 15 to 17 calories per pound per day.

              It really depends on your body size.. small people move around a lot more efficiently than large people and require less energy.

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              • #8
                Again, those were the numbers that popped up in the Google. Your numbers are probably spot on but I think you might agree that post SHTF our easiest days are behind us. A person trying to go back to the old ways will burn a load of calories, then let it be in winter. As I recall the military used to issue 3 MRE's a day in winter conditions which was to be about 9000 calories. Post-SHTF, when people go from turning up the thermostat to needing to split a cord of wood to heat their house, they'll burn a lot more calories. Having done hard labor construction when I was young, I'm telling you putting up hay or cutting and splitting firewood burned even more calories.

                Your point on body size and metabolism are spot on. I'm 6'2" and by all the BMI calculators and the Navy's standards I'm only to be at a max weight of 180lbs. Now to put that in perspective I'm your standard issue corn fed country boy that in my prime had a 50-52" chest and now that I got "fluffy" is closer to a 60" chest. When I left boot camp with a set of 6 pack abs I tipped the scale at 220lbs and was wearing 36" waist pants. At 180, I would look like a concentration camp victim but yet we're told that's what is to be "typical".
                I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

                Comment


                • #9
                  My parents grew up on a farm as well. Things were not as bad for the farmers and homesteaders. Only thing now is that riots and such will start in the cities and then spread out to farm lands and anywhere along the way they think there might be food. And yes in this day and age. I do believe they would kill for anything they could get.. Things are not like they were 60 to a 100 years ago. People today are to used to having the govenrment feed them and give them free or almost free housing.. That will no longer exsist in a SHTF situation on a long term bases. Those will be the ones that will rob, steal, rape, and kill for what they want. Sad but true that this country has become like it has.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If I remember my Dad's stories correctly, not everything was rationed. And those rationed were often traded among families or individuals. For instance if you hated the cheese available you might make deal with a friend or neighbor to go ahead and buy it and trade it to him for something he had plenty of or did not like, say Spam. Or you might just trade the stamps. The exact terms being set before the purchase of either. Also potatoes and bread were never rationed during WW II thus providing additional calories depending on what you could afford. My family also lived on a small family farms, either as owners or share croppers.They all had gardens and a few head of livestock. The share croppers were allowed a certain amount of land for their personal use that the land. The owner had no rights to anything produced on or by that land be it live stock or garden. One of my great grand parents had 5 acres for personal use of the 50 he grew corn on for the owner. No one ever told me what his share of the corn was but the had a kitchen garden, a potato patch, a bean/squash/pumpkin patch, grazing for a milk cow and a hog pen. I almost forgot, chickens lived around the barn. So they produced most of the things on the rationed list of foods.

                    I have what is lift of the last ration book of my paternal grandparents (in a safety deposit box) but don't remember what the remaining ration stamps were for. Sugar was the most sought after by my family who quickly learned to use molasses and wild honey for cooking. Sugar was reserved for canning and the very rare cake. Pie abounded in our area as molasses could be used for sweetening.

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                    • #11
                      Interesting Z and very cool about still having the coupon book as a keepsake. On the part about sugar and using molasses instead I'm thinking maybe some of that is why things like molasses cookies and shoefly pie were (and still are to a point) big around these parts.
                      I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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                      • #12
                        Very interesting ZAGran. I always find it interesting to learn more of the history, especially from those who have lived it. We were always city folk, and my parents never talked about the war or rationing. Also very good information to hear about alternatives to things like sugar. I do keep a large supply of honey, but I never thought about molasses.
                        The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

                        Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Before you run out and stock up on molasses you need to know a bit more about it.
                          First there is molasses made from sugar cane. It comes in 3 forms. Sulphured, Unsulphured & Black Strap. In my youth the following described the difference.

                          Sulphured molasses is the syrup left over after the first boiling of the sugarcane juice and the extraction of white sugar. It is lightest in color ( usually a golden color) and sweetest of the 3. While Sugar itself has no nutrition the remaining syrup (molasses) does. Because of it's moisture content sulphur dioxide is added to prevent the growth of bacteria or lighten it's color or extend shelf life.

                          Unsulphured molasses comes from the second boiling and extraction of white sugar. It has less moisture (it is thicker), darker in color, thicker and does not have any sulphur dioxide added. The nutrients in it are more concentrated. It is not as sweet and has a very slight bitter (not unpleasant) taste because of the caramelization of some of the sugar.

                          Black Strap molasses is what is left after after the third boiling of the sugar cane and extraction of white sugar. It is the darkest (most caramelized) and thickest of the 3 and has the densest concentration of nutrients and a distinct bitter taste. Some people considered it fit only for animal consumption. Other tout it as a super food.

                          Blackstrap molasses is often used for its nutritional benefit, containing nearly 20% of our daily need for calcium, magnesium, potassium, and iron per tablespoon, among others (though this may vary depending on brand). https://www.willcookforfriends.com/2...ak-friday.html

                          America's molasses is somewhat comparable to British trechle

                          Now days you can get all three but apparent the labeling is different. I haven't seen any golden colored molasses in years, I think that form of molasses is marketed as some form of syrups . Both sulphured and unsulphured appear in taste and consistency, to me, to be from the same (second boiling) batch with a little difference in color, due to the sulphur dioxide. This is MY OWN OPINION.

                          Now sorghum molasses,the second kind & my favorite, is an entirely different animal. It is made from sweet sorghum, a type of grain grown from the Carolinas to Oklahoma.The juice is cooked down with no sugar removed until it reaches a certain color & consistency, them put into jars (usually fruit jars). When I was pre-school you could still get it in small kegs, around 5 gal I think. The grain can be feed to livestock or ground into flour for human consumption. The making of sorghum molasses is mostly a cottage industry. Since I am close to Arkansas I get my sorghum molasses there becausethe one maker in eastern Oklahoma I knew of went out of business 40 - 50 years ago.
                          Last edited by ZAGran; 08-30-2018, 11:40 AM. Reason: omited words

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                          • #14


                            I need to make a correction to the above. After I wrote about getting sorghum molasses in 5 gal. kegs I made some nectar the humming birds that come every year. I have anywhere from 8 to 30 depending on the year and how the hummers fared on their migration and in their wintering grounds. This year is a good year with around 20 to 25. As I took sugar from the 5 gal food safe bucket I realized it was much to big to be held under my grandmother's arm as I remember her doing when she would fill a small jar to sit on the table for breakfast. The small keg I remember could not be 5 gal. keg. It had to be smaller. I dug out the old photo album and and flipped through it looking for photo evidence of the small keg remembered . There was one of a small keg sitting beside a 5 gal crock for making pickles. I can't swear it had molasses in it but appeared to be the right size. It was more in the 2 to 2 1/2 gal size. So accept my apologies for mis-stating the size of the "lasses" keg.

                            Butter & 'lasses spread on a hot biscuit, yum-yum! Excuse me while I go make a small pan of biscuits for dinner and put the butter out to soften.
                            Last edited by ZAGran; 08-31-2018, 02:39 PM. Reason: spelling

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