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  • Brosia
    replied
    excellent looking garden Mike & Teach!

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  • herbalpagan
    replied
    Wonderful garden space! So neat and well organized. Mine is in no shape for pictures right now, but hopefully next week will give me some warmer weather so I can whip it into shape.

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  • Lostinoz
    replied
    W4OCO, nice garden! Thanks for sharing the pics and I look forward to seeing more! I will try to remember to take my camera the next time we work in our garden and post some pics.

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  • W4OCO
    replied
    Garden Picture

    Here is a picture of our garden that shows our irrigation system header with drip hoses attached. We are able to feed water from our 6 rain barrels with pump or city water yard supply. We have tomatoes, cabbage, onions, potatoes, carrots, corn and green beans in the ground. Teach is my better half. Garden needs tilling and hoeing, pictures taking after 1.5 inches of hard rain. More pictures to come later.

    W4OCO
    Mike & Teach
    Attached Files
    Last edited by W4OCO; 04-13-2009, 10:02 AM.

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  • Lostinoz
    replied
    Today we finally were able to plant the onions, potatoes, tomato plants, spinach, turnip greens, bell peppers and lettuce. Tomorrow, before the rain starts, we plan to finish out 2 more rows of tomato plants.

    How is everyone else's garden coming along, well, those who are able to plant at the moment.

    I am very proud of the new strawberry patch we started. The plants already have runners attached and starting new plants. Each plant has about 3 strawberries on it right now.

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  • herbalpagan
    replied
    IMO, the "three sisters" works best if you have a traditional garden. The vines need a place to spread out. I don't grow vining beans, so I don't need to use it. I also have opted not to grow corn. Corn takes a lot of space and nutrients, and as it's mostly my husband and me and he hates corn, there isn't any point to growing it.
    However, the "three sisters" is just another method of companion and "tiered" gardening. This makes a lot of sense, especially when space is at a premium. I grew tomatoes last year in one of my beds and peppers in another. Rather than let the space betweem go to waste, I popped in some spinach seeds. Spinach grows fast, but it also can take a wee bit of shade. Perfect for the space I had. I'll plant my dill, but underneath I may do lettuce...get creative! When one crop is fading another can be seeded to take over.

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  • Skyowl's Wife
    replied
    Any of you try "Three Sisters" type of garden? Was reading about it today.
    Links at http://www.nativetech.org/cornhusk/threesisters.html and http://www.reneesgarden.com/articles/3sisters.html and http://www.ecoliteracy.org/publications/3sisters.html and a table of "compatible" plantings is at http://www.canadiancountrywoman.com/...nionplants.php .

    Lots to read there!

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  • pathfinder3081
    replied
    Thanks for the feed back from both of you. We are Planting / Sprouting our seeds over the next few days. It is going to be two or three weekends before the raised beds are complete. If we get good germination I will plant these seeds exclusivly. Will it hurt to blend with other hybird plants as long as I keep tract of which is which?

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  • herbalpagan
    replied
    You can go ahead and try them. If you want to know in advance how viable they are, take ten seeds and put them on a wet paper towel. Wrap them up and place them in a plastic bag for several days. Check every day, keeping the paper towel very damp to see if any are sprouting. After 10 days (for most seeds) you should have a fair idea of how well they will sprout...10 seeds=100%,8 seeds=80% etc.
    Or, you could just plant them and watch and replant as needed.
    Some seeds ARE vacuum packed and I still have some from years ago (now that I think about it) and they work just fine for many seeds, keeps them fresher and dry. I think it's cost prohibitive for things like peas and beans though.

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  • Brosia
    replied
    use them definitely! But make sure you have more seeds, just in case. I have seeds from a number of sources, in case one crop fails, I've got plenty more set by.

    Perhaps HP can answer this question, but I thought since seeds are living things, they should not be vacuum packed?

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  • pathfinder3081
    replied
    Originally posted by herbalpagan View Post
    In my first raised bed garden, it was a scraggly forest and we cut the trees and moved them around to make raised beds, then filled them. This one we got pressure treated lumber and built 4/16' beds, with a brace in the middle to keep the boards from bowing. I researched about the pressure treated stuff, but learned that it won't hurt the plants or soil, something about it not leeching out. Plus they use a different method now to treat it.
    I hate pulling stumps, and tend to cut them up and mound the soil around them and make it a feature! :p I have a stump in the middle of our front garden, and I planted a tall grass and herbs around it and then set a bird bath on top of the stump. The butterflies love it and they help with polination too.
    I was wondering if I could get some advise:o I have had these seed since 2002. Do you think that it's time to "use or loose" them?
    Attached Files

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  • Gatesvilleguy
    replied
    Here is a link for anyone thinking of a raised garden
    http://journeytoforever.org/garden_sqft.html

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  • pathfinder3081
    replied
    Thanks for the quote of confidence we already shared..PF..

    I'll "PIC" profile the beginning to the end. (for research and stuff)
    PF

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  • herbalpagan
    replied
    In my first raised bed garden, it was a scraggly forest and we cut the trees and moved them around to make raised beds, then filled them. This one we got pressure treated lumber and built 4/16' beds, with a brace in the middle to keep the boards from bowing. I researched about the pressure treated stuff, but learned that it won't hurt the plants or soil, something about it not leeching out. Plus they use a different method now to treat it.
    I hate pulling stumps, and tend to cut them up and mound the soil around them and make it a feature! :p I have a stump in the middle of our front garden, and I planted a tall grass and herbs around it and then set a bird bath on top of the stump. The butterflies love it and they help with polination too.

    Leave a comment:


  • pathfinder3081
    replied
    Very good info.. I am cutting the trees and have plans for the "Built up garden". I have been surfing. I see a few resevations about using treated lumber? Is there a big problem with using treated lumber and boards at the border because if toxins in treated lumber?. I can use the pine drops and dead fall as a border. ( I just dont' want to spend the next 3 or 4 weeks pulling stumps) I have found a topsoil provider who's tandem load to that will fill our beds at a good price. What do you recomend?
    Thanks for the info. PF

    Leave a comment:

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