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  • Omegaman
    replied
    You can also make pumpkin leather like the Indians did or use a dehydrator. Pumpkin leather is nothing more then thin strips or slices of pumpkin that have been dried to be used later in breads soups or anything else or worse case eaten plain. Pumpkin leather has along self life if kept dry and it is easy to store and carry.

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  • sd allen
    replied
    I will add a punkin patch this year for sure.

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    Originally posted by Loshali View Post
    I was grazing the freezer looking for something for supper, and decided on spare ribs. I saw a bag of something that I'd frozen (think its turkey broth from Thanksgiving? could be. Why didnt I mark it!!!). So I thought I"d fix some turkey stew for tomorrow while I was cooking tonight. Got out my pot and started simmering the frozen block of 'something', and low and behold, its pumpkin that I froze around thanksgiving! Gah, definitely not turkey, lol.. So ok, I can make some pumpkin bread with this. Little flour, some nuts, brown sugar, couple eggs, some vanilla and all the 'sweet' spices in my cabinet (cinnamon, allspice, clove, nutmeg, ginger, vanilla). Man, that is some tasty bread.

    I bought the pumpkins at a pumpkin center a couple days after Halloween for about $4 for half a dozen big pumpkins. Nice haul huh? Thats definitely the time to get them. If you like pumpkin seeds, you get almost a quart out of one pumpkin.

    And there's so much pulp! These pumpkins dont really have its own distinguished flavor, it more or less takes on the flavor of what it's cooked with. Yes, some things are slightly different with pumpkin, but not a lot. Fresh pumpkin is a world away from the canned gunk you might make a quick pie with. Its slightly stringy, with a huge amount of fiber and vitamins. You can make soups, enhance pies like apple and pear, breads, cakes, etc. Its sweet on its own, so you use less sugar or honey. Its easy to can and prepare. Just scoop out the pulp and put it in a pot with some water and let it simmer. Very little sugar is needed to make a filling. Water bath can to Ball directions.

    Then there's the farming side. If you grow a pumpkin patch, pigs and goats will love the leaves and vines once you harvest. Chickens love the pulp and seeds. Pigs and goats love the flesh as well. Very inexpensive and you yield such a good harvest from a few plants. Definitely worth having a pumpkin corner in your survival garden...
    I wish I could raise pigglets here in town.

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  • Brosia
    replied
    awesome. great idea!

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  • Loshali
    started a topic Survival garden

    Survival garden

    I was grazing the freezer looking for something for supper, and decided on spare ribs. I saw a bag of something that I'd frozen (think its turkey broth from Thanksgiving? could be. Why didnt I mark it!!!). So I thought I"d fix some turkey stew for tomorrow while I was cooking tonight. Got out my pot and started simmering the frozen block of 'something', and low and behold, its pumpkin that I froze around thanksgiving! Gah, definitely not turkey, lol.. So ok, I can make some pumpkin bread with this. Little flour, some nuts, brown sugar, couple eggs, some vanilla and all the 'sweet' spices in my cabinet (cinnamon, allspice, clove, nutmeg, ginger, vanilla). Man, that is some tasty bread.

    I bought the pumpkins at a pumpkin center a couple days after Halloween for about $4 for half a dozen big pumpkins. Nice haul huh? Thats definitely the time to get them. If you like pumpkin seeds, you get almost a quart out of one pumpkin.

    And there's so much pulp! These pumpkins dont really have its own distinguished flavor, it more or less takes on the flavor of what it's cooked with. Yes, some things are slightly different with pumpkin, but not a lot. Fresh pumpkin is a world away from the canned gunk you might make a quick pie with. Its slightly stringy, with a huge amount of fiber and vitamins. You can make soups, enhance pies like apple and pear, breads, cakes, etc. Its sweet on its own, so you use less sugar or honey. Its easy to can and prepare. Just scoop out the pulp and put it in a pot with some water and let it simmer. Very little sugar is needed to make a filling. Water bath can to Ball directions.

    Then there's the farming side. If you grow a pumpkin patch, pigs and goats will love the leaves and vines once you harvest. Chickens love the pulp and seeds. Pigs and goats love the flesh as well. Very inexpensive and you yield such a good harvest from a few plants. Definitely worth having a pumpkin corner in your survival garden...
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