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First Aid Kit to fit in mesh bottle carrier pocket of a backpack?

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  • First Aid Kit to fit in mesh bottle carrier pocket of a backpack?

    I have a new bag as of a couple months and decided downsize my PFAK, but the bag had 2 bottle-type pockets, one with solid fabric and one made with the mesh.

    I am not generally a fan of those mesh/net bottle carrier pockets on backpacks. They seem (likely) to snag on things and get torn easily.

    But if there was a first aid kit designed to go in that sort of space--it would have to be the right size and shape, but also be sturdily made and closed so that riding on the outside of the backpack wouldn't compromise it--I'd have gone with that.

    I've made a FAK with the ziploc snack baggies inside a fabric cover (like at this link: http://gourmetbyjanae.blogspot.com/2...t-aid-kit.html) and that might work in terms of size and shape, but I'm not sure about the sturdiness aspect.

    If anyone knows of a kit that would work this way, I'd be glad to hear about it.

    Been there, done that. Then been there again several times, because apparently I never learn.

  • #2
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    • #3
      Why not just get a cheap knock off nalge type bottle and stuff your PFAK in there and then it'll fit in the packs pouch as it's designed plus be water proof and in a very tough case.

      Lay your kit out like a mini tool roll. All you need to do then is roll it up and slide it into the bottle. You could even possibly put a SAM splint inside to fill out the area under the lip or maybe instead put it around the outside diameter of the bottle to give you more room. Heck they sell "survival" kits in bottles like I'm describing.

      Just an idea..
      I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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      • #4
        I had thought about that and thought it'd be too hard to get at stuff, but I hadn't thought about how that would give a double use of the bottle--available for toting water, but also protecting the FAK, so with those aspects in mind, yeah! I think that's the way to go. Thanks.
        Been there, done that. Then been there again several times, because apparently I never learn.

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        • #5
          I hate those mesh pockets. I always feel like whatever I have in there is going to fall out. I have a tiny PFAK in my get home bag. It is about 2-3" square. I works amazingly well, and I'm sorry, but I do not remember where I got it. You might try a small kit that would fit in the pocket with a small carabiner to secure it. I wouldn't trust zip lock bags.
          The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

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          • #6
            I recommend building your own kit Schneb. Sometime you can get a nice "container" one comes in but it always seems most of the cheap store bought ones, lets say they say 200pc, well they do but the problem is 190pieces are band-aids and often not good ones or ones of the size you most often would need. so hand pick bandaids, mole skin, alcohol wipes prep wipes, burn gel, triple antibiotic cream, maybe some electrolyte powder, tweezers, ibuprofen, anti-diarreheal, itch cream and then say some large gauze and maybe an ace bandage. wrap the water bottle with duct tape and you have all the first aid tape you need. This mainly needs to be a IFAK as you don't have weight available to carry some huge first responder kit. but if you know how to use all the things in one of those, by all means keep it in your vehicle.

            Hope this helps some. Only limited by your imagination and experience. I'm curious, when you ask your students about what they think are in first aid kits, what do they say or wonder if any besides Scouts have ever given it a thought.
            Last edited by CountryGuy; 03-05-2018, 07:02 PM.
            I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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            • #7
              Schneb, have you ever considered a rip away IFAK like the one from Condor Tactical? I've used one for almost 5 years now in all kinds of conditions and I've been impressed with how well it works. I carry a fairly extensive IFAK so that I can deal with anything from blisters and bee stings to severe trauma such as gun shots or broken bones. I keep it usually on my ATV or side by side, but it easily snaps on my belt or back pack when needed. https://www.condoroutdoor.com/Condor-MA41-008.aspx Just a thought. I also build my own kit so that I have a good kit without all the junk usually in commercial kits.

              Dale
              Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by dalewick View Post
                I also build my own kit so that I have a good kit without all the junk usually in commercial kits.

                Dale
                Amen to that--seems like the kits that claim to have lots of items often have dozens of odd shapes of band-aids.

                I'm going to look-up the Condor Tactical to see how big it is--if it'd ride in those mesh water bottle pouches that'd be ideal, as my new (smaller) bag has two such and for everyday use, I don't need to carry two water bottles. Since the bag is smaller I'm looking for ways to use every inch of it and being able to tuck my FAK in that outside mesh pocket would free up a nice bit of space inside the bag.

                But I kinda have a sweet-tooth-like soft spot for bags and such in the size range where you could wear them on a belt, or add them as an accessory for another bag. Having a sort of upgraded FAK that I could add that way could be kind of handy: the mini-kit would have the band-aids and asprin and such, but this one could be tacked on for situations where more might be needed.
                Been there, done that. Then been there again several times, because apparently I never learn.

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                • #9
                  Oh Dalewick, now you got me looking at all those bags--and there's 5 million of them on eBay! I'll be up for a while I think. :-)

                  ...but they do look good. I like the ripaway feature for mounting it in a vehicle.
                  Been there, done that. Then been there again several times, because apparently I never learn.

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