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  • Treating A Wound

    Broken skin is a laceration or "wound". In a world with no running water and antibiotics any wound can become worse because of additional infection from contamination. The medical field has learned that when a proper bandage is placed on a laceration and not changed out that it has a tendency to create its own antibody and heal better without complications. Follow the procedure[LIST=1][*]1. If you do not have clean water it can be cleaned with a water purification tablet.[*]2. Clean the wound and area with clean or treated water and completely dry. [*]3. With a guaze roll of 2" 3" or 4" cut a piece off large enough to fit over the wound fairly thick. [*]4. Betadine purchased from a drug store comes in 3 or 4 oz bottles which is similar to iodine but can be used on below the skin tissue and pour some on and apply to area. If the wound is very large then a continuous piece such as the 2" should be soaked in betadine and fill in the wound.[*]5. Wrap the guaze roll around to secure the bandage in place and tape securely.[*]6.The bandage should stay on a minimum of 5 days, 7-10 days is better for the wound to have its own antibody effect and keep the bandage dry. If it gets wet only replace the wrap, not the bandage!
    Even if the Betadine has expired it is more than likely still good and is ever so much better than nothing. So stock these items: Betadine, gauze rolls, and water purification tablets. THE EQUIPMENT, SUPPLIES, MEDICINES, AND MEDICINES ARE DONE WITH BY ORDER OF A PHYSICIAN AND QUALIFIED INDIVIDUALS. THIS IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE ONLY AND THIS INFORMATION IS NOT ENDORSED OR SUGGESTED BY THIS MESSAGE FORUM.
    THE LARGER THE CITY THE FASTER IT FALLS

  • #2
    are you sure?

    Is there a website that supports this? It sounds dangerous to me. I was taught that betadyn was cytotoxic (meaning it kills bad bugs in you but also your cells aswell).
    " I would rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it! "

    Comment


    • #3
      As a rule, I will not allow anything substance ending in "ine" to remain on a wound without properly cleansing it on occasion.....not even iodine....one of those rules of thumb you pick up in field medic training....

      If there's no water available for wound cleansing, even boiled-down urine will serve better than letting a wound serve itself under an old bandage....
      "I Have Sworn Upon the Altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man." -Thomas Jefferson

      "When plunder becomes a way of life for a group of men living together in society, they create for themselves, in the course of time, a legal system that authorizes it and a moral code that glorifies it." -Frederic Bastiat

      Comment


      • #4
        In the medical field even in deep wounds are packed with betadine soaked onto what is called nu gauze and left 3-4 days without a dressing change and this is with antibiotics.
        THE LARGER THE CITY THE FASTER IT FALLS

        Comment


        • #5
          Many deep wounds in the medical field have been packed with betadine soaked gauze and left there for a few days. In WW1 there was a study that found out that changing out dressings too often was causing increased infections and this was a time without antibiotics. Yes I agree if a wound needs to be debris a dressing change is in order. The betadine was applied at the beginning. Were you refering to tincture or solution? The surgical operating procedures often preop clean open wounds with betadine. Guys, its not poison-it helps and if your in a world without antibiotics treating a wound can be tricky no matter how you look at it. During the war between the states if a knife or sword wound or gunshot wound hit limbs they were amputated just because of impending infection. Treat the wound as you see fit and may you have good luck. PHR
          THE LARGER THE CITY THE FASTER IT FALLS

          Comment


          • #6
            IMO, betadine is an awesome wound cleaner and sanitizer, but I would not use it in a wound dressing without a good antibiotic on hand, and the WW reference is true, but it's because the medics and their help were dressing hundreds of wound a day, with poor sanitization in between and cross0contaminating their PXs.....
            "I Have Sworn Upon the Altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man." -Thomas Jefferson

            "When plunder becomes a way of life for a group of men living together in society, they create for themselves, in the course of time, a legal system that authorizes it and a moral code that glorifies it." -Frederic Bastiat

            Comment


            • #7
              when I went through SFQC (special forces qualification course) part of our training was to debride and amputate limbs. We learned there are three ways to basicly close a wound.

              1. Primary intention closing a wound imediately.

              2. secondary intent used mostly when there is not enough tissue to close or there is an infection.

              3. delayed primary closure which is used when there is a high chance of infection.

              I pulled out my old manuals and there is a lot covered here I'll throw it out there so you guys can take what you like. I am omitting a lot because I don't feel like retyping the whole chapter but I'll keep the imoprtant stuff.

              the purposes of surgical dressings are to protect the wound, apply preasure but not to much, support viable tissue, absorb drainage, and administer medications. classical dressings are gauze that you can moisten that is used inside the wound while something non-adherent is used on the outside. The gauze helps you bebride the tissue gently by applying the dresssing and removing it 4-6 hours later and wetting it if it is stuck to the wound. You don't want to disturb any of the healing process with it. But you do want dead tissue out and any puss/infection to come out with it. There are also dressings you can apply for drainage of a infected wound like iodoform gauze or even making something as simple as a tube to drain.

              Antiseptic solutions you can use are.

              Normal saline: mositens and helps healing.

              Hydrogen peroxide: dissloves clotted blood in wound but slows the healing process.

              betadine: preparation of wound to be cleaned may be used for severly contaminated slows the healing process and useless on severe burns.

              Dakin's solution at 1/2 to 1/4 strength to clean a wound but slows the healing process.

              Acetics acid, neomycin, bacitracin, polysporin, gentamycin are all antibiotic and have their strengths. Neomycin, bacitracin, polysporin are the broader spectrum antibiotics so you would have a more luck with them if you don't know what you're dealing with.

              Each bandage should be changed atleast once a day if not more. So while you can use betadine to clean a wound it is not a good idea to leave it in. If there is some new info out there that has come out I'd love to hear it. I'd be happy to eat my words if i'm wrong.

              that is the down and dirty I left a lot out I hope that there is enough info there that you can put the pieces together and make it work for yourself. good luck.
              " I would rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it! "

              Comment


              • #8
                According to:

                Originally posted by PHR View Post
                Broken skin is a laceration or "wound". In a world with no running water and antibiotics any wound can become worse because of additional infection from contamination. The medical field has learned that when a proper bandage is placed on a laceration and not changed out that it has a tendency to create its own antibody and heal better without complications. Follow the procedure[LIST=1][*]1. If you do not have clean water it can be cleaned with a water purification tablet.[*]2. Clean the wound and area with clean or treated water and completely dry. [*]3. With a guaze roll of 2" 3" or 4" cut a piece off large enough to fit over the wound fairly thick. [*]4. Betadine purchased from a drug store comes in 3 or 4 oz bottles which is similar to iodine but can be used on below the skin tissue and pour some on and apply to area. If the wound is very large then a continuous piece such as the 2" should be soaked in betadine and fill in the wound.[*]5. Wrap the guaze roll around to secure the bandage in place and tape securely.[*]6.The bandage should stay on a minimum of 5 days, 7-10 days is better for the wound to have its own antibody effect and keep the bandage dry. If it gets wet only replace the wrap, not the bandage!
                Even if the Betadine has expired it is more than likely still good and is ever so much better than nothing. So stock these items: Betadine, gauze rolls, and water purification tablets. THE EQUIPMENT, SUPPLIES, MEDICINES, AND MEDICINES ARE DONE WITH BY ORDER OF A PHYSICIAN AND QUALIFIED INDIVIDUALS. THIS IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE ONLY AND THIS INFORMATION IS NOT ENDORSED OR SUGGESTED BY THIS MESSAGE FORUM.
                My US Army Survival Manual, circa 1991

                "CAUTION: Do not apply common antiseptics such iodine, merthiolate, and mercurochrome directly to a wound without diluting them. These solutions can cause further tissue damage, and should be used on intact skin only."

                "Cover the wound with a clean dressin. Place a bandage on the dressing to hold it in place.
                Change the dressing daily to check for infection"

                It goes on about how to treat an infection including maggot therapy.
                You can't get here from there. ;)

                Comment


                • #9
                  I still cannot believe these replies: All the recomondations army or not are based on a world with eventual antibiotics. If you are at the point of needing a drain you best amputate then. If the WW1 study was based on dirty hands dressing too many wounds in one day...what makes you think in a world without running water after taking a daily dump and wipe that anyone's hands will be clean? In the no running water world will be close to if not any better than Africa right now with cholera. This is burn out! see yall PHR
                  THE LARGER THE CITY THE FASTER IT FALLS

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by PHR View Post
                    I still cannot believe these replies: All the recomondations army or not are based on a world with eventual antibiotics. If you are at the point of needing a drain you best amputate then. If the WW1 study was based on dirty hands dressing too many wounds in one day...what makes you think in a world without running water after taking a daily dump and wipe that anyone's hands will be clean? In the no running water world will be close to if not any better than Africa right now with cholera. This is burn out! see yall PHR
                    Wow...that was quick.....guess your's is the only opinion that matters to you....bye then.
                    "I Have Sworn Upon the Altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man." -Thomas Jefferson

                    "When plunder becomes a way of life for a group of men living together in society, they create for themselves, in the course of time, a legal system that authorizes it and a moral code that glorifies it." -Frederic Bastiat

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I do realize that this is a old, old post. However, despite the new stuff that might have come to us since 82 or 83. I will talk from having lived thru it. I packed a Betadine
                      2x2 cork gauze or a 3x3 into a gunshot wound, and slowly watched the skin grow to the suface and become even with my flesh, from a 2" deep hole. Now, that is all post surgery, and in a clean and mantainable enviro. Would that make a difference? If you are not allergic to the "dine" family; use it. If you have to use it to much, you might be in the future. I don't know. I can not use the "sporin" brothers any more. I have to stay away. I can not use Oxy, Neo, or the Chortis cosin either. It was a hit as well, because they are good medicines. I am not a Doctor, Nurse or EMT. I just watch and listen. Please read any and all the new information out there on first aid and all that goes with it. I bent the ear of MD friend of mine and he agreed on this product. Betadine is yet to become a bad thing.... I think? PF
                      Last edited by pathfinder3081; 03-05-2009, 09:28 AM. Reason: text
                      "And with a collection of minds and talent, they survived"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Saw,

                        This makes me think a new thread might be in order...

                        It is my opinion that we are all here to help each other prepare and be ready for just about any event that occurs. From the past little snow event here in the South, all the way to an "EOTW" scenario, we should consider and be prepared for all variations. Does this sound about right?

                        Some of the other posts seemed a little too focused on "EOTW", worst case scenario only, without any shades of grey that might be encountered.

                        But, then again, I'm ignernt.
                        If it looks ignernt, but it works, then it ain't ignernt.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Betadine is generally used for skin degerming. It iis used primarily as a presurgical hand scrub by surgeons etc, and as a presurgical skin cleanser used topically (on the skin surface) of the patient to kill both gram positive and gram negative bacteria and reduce the possibility for infection. I do agree that in a world with limited hygienic facilities and supplies, and limited anti-septics and antibiotics, that the microscopic bad guys are going to be much more dangerous to mankind than the two-legged bad guys. Jusy my opinion. Bubba





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                          BETADINE® Solution is the aqueous solution of 10% povidone-iodine. It is a fast-acting, broad-spectrum antiseptic that kills gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria (including antibiotic resistant organisms), as well as most fungi/yeasts, viruses and protozoa. It is used for degerming skin, wounds and mucous membranes, and for preoperative skin preparation of patients.
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                          BETADINE® Spray provides 5% povidone-iodine solution in a pump spray. It delivers a microbicidal mist for wounds too tender to touch. It saves time and is indicated whenever effective microbicidal skin degerming can be applied more conveniently with a spray.
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                          BETASEPT® Surgical Scrub 4% chlorhexidine gluconate provides rapid antiseptic action with a persistent antimicrobial effect against a wide range of microorganisms. For surgical hand-scrubbing, healthcare personnel handwashing, preoperative patient prepping, and general skin degerming.
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                          Simple precautions such as washing hands can help reduce the risk of infections caused by bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics.
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