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Basic Lesson Number 160 Review of Trauma Kits

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  • Basic Lesson Number 160 Review of Trauma Kits

    Review of Trauma Kits



    Started a review of commercial made Trauma Kits that you wear on a belt or strapped to your leg. The problem is they don't carry everything I want, or they carry too much, and they cost too much! So far most are the size of a gas mask size container. Weight from 12 oz to over 36 oz. Cost every thing from $36-127.



    Operational Requirement:
    individual Trauma kit needs to be carried by each member of group, while away from home/retreat. Has immediate major trauma and first aid basic requirements. This reduces the requirement for having a Medic along on each mission.


    Training: Use the Red Cross to get courses in basic first aid, CRP, advance first aid, etc. Continue to seek training - You cannot go wrong with this.

    My group has every one trained in basic trauma management and advance first aid. This next summer we will be sending two of the kids to a mountain rescue school in CO. It is 6 weeks long and goes well beyond the basics. Cost +$3200.00 each but well worth it.


    Wish list: This kit should be able to handle one or two major trauma injuries per individual. Additional medical aid will be required within 1-2 hours.

    a. (1) CAT tourniquet - can be used single handed very important

    b. (1) 1/4" x 30" stretchable rubber tubing - reduces blood flow without total stoppage

    c. (2) Israel Battle dressing 6" - best battle dressing made today

    d. (4 oz) Processed Honey - honey will stop blood flow and is antibacterial

    e. (Assortment) OTC meds - Pain relief, tums, allergy relief

    f. (Assortment) Individual wound care packets - alcohol, antibacterial, wound cleaning, etc.

    g. (10) Band Aids - assorted


    Note: Weight with container about 14 oz. Nylon case 6"x8"x3" weight 4-7 oz.

    I have all the materials but still looking at containers

  • #2
    on the container, thinking a little out of the box, that would be about the size of some side by side DVD cases I've seen. The type used for taking them along in the minivan to use in the DVD player. Doubt they'd be super durable but could depend.

    Other idea would be a SAW magazine pouch holder. I have one I use for holding a 75rd AK drum and it'd be about the size you want and would be mil-spec so u know it'll last.
    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

    Comment


    • #3
      You might consider a soft sided lunch box for a container. Wally World usually has them for under $10.00. Is this something you put in a bag, or carry on your belt?
      The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

      Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

      Comment


      • #4
        How you carry it is up to you. On a pistol belt, in a pocket, on your back pack, or attached to your thigh like a gas mask pouch.

        I like the idea of the SAW pouch. They are cheap on E-Bay.

        Another Hint: The usage of the kit, is for use on the individual, carrying the kit. You do not use your own, because you may need it for yourself.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hint: Define major trauma: Major blood loss, stop breathing, heart stopped, broken bones, concussion, shot by firearm or bow, etc. We are not talking about a sprain finger.

          I did not include a 14 gauge needle to do a decompression of the lung cavity. To do this you need very good training or on-job-training during war. If you get shot in the lung you will need to decompress the cavity with a 14 gauge needle. They are about 6"-8" in length.

          You might have a good multi-tool along to help pull out any arrow heads, or buck shot.

          Comment


          • #6
            Rich, do you mean like a body piercing needle?

            Comment


            • #7
              I think rich is wanting a needle for dealing with Tension Pneumothorax from a collapsed lung, Often associated with a GSW to the chest. Something like these maybe.
              Click image for larger version

Name:	PROD%20-%20PMI%20660576%20Decompression%20needle.open.1.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	21.2 KB
ID:	188217

              From, http://theopsdeck.com/MEDKIT%20CONTE...PMI.660576.htm

              Regular large gauge needles are routinely used if you've had the training.

              Dale

              Comment


              • #8
                cool, thanks Dale

                Comment


                • #9
                  Don't buy one or try to use one without the proper training and experience. That is very advance Medical Training. It is because you will press the needle very near large veins and arteries even the heart. You have to be able to do it not under normal learning conditions but under fire and a lot of stress.
                  PS thanks Dale my mind went blank when I first wrote it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RICHFL View Post
                    Don't buy one or try to use one without the proper training and experience. That is very advance Medical Training. It is because you will press the needle very near large veins and arteries even the heart. You have to be able to do it not under normal learning conditions but under fire and a lot of stress.
                    PS thanks Dale my mind went blank when I first wrote it.
                    RICH, It's one of those things for me that I would like to forget learning and using but I'm afraid I may need those skills again some day.

                    Dale

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RICHFL View Post
                      Don't buy one or try to use one without the proper training and experience. That is very advance Medical Training. It is because you will press the needle very near large veins and arteries even the heart. You have to be able to do it not under normal learning conditions but under fire and a lot of stress.
                      PS thanks Dale my mind went blank when I first wrote it.
                      understood

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Maybe you should consider sending one or more
                        of your group to an EMT course in your area. It
                        would be more comprehensive and cheaper than
                        the mountain rescue course and it covers a wide
                        range of both medical and rescue skills. It is a
                        pre-requisite to the paramedic courses.

                        Courses are usually available through community
                        colleges, local fire/rescue services and sometimes
                        even through high schools as part of the community
                        service curriculum.

                        Cost is usually free if you are a fire/rescue member.
                        (You may even consider joining such an organization
                        to both get training and giving back to the community
                        and even meet many like-minded people there.) And
                        the fire/rescue service will expose you to the WORST
                        conditions out there that you will encounter in a SHTF
                        situation!
                        Last edited by fireman; 03-07-2016, 11:42 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=fireman;124729]Maybe you should consider sending one or more
                          of your group to an EMT course in your area. It
                          would be more comprehensive and cheaper than
                          the mountain rescue course and it covers a wide
                          range of both medical and rescue skills. It is a
                          pre-requisite to the paramedic courses.[QUOTE]

                          I am doing just that next month! I don't have a "group" just family, but I want to be prepared for that "just in case" emergency. I've done the basic Red Cross first aid stuff, but found a local guy teaching move advanced stuff. Hope to God I never need to use it, but it's the prepper in me!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I thought Red Cross used to do their training for free? I looked into some basic courses for a refresher and to take my oldest daughter to and was surprised to see it was several hundred dollars a head. Anyone know of any options out there for free or lower cost for someone on a budget?
                            I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by CountryGuy View Post
                              I thought Red Cross used to do their training for free? I looked into some basic courses for a refresher and to take my oldest daughter to and was surprised to see it was several hundred dollars a head. Anyone know of any options out there for free or lower cost for someone on a budget?
                              If your daughter is a student she should be able to get her First aid and CPR training and cert card for free. http://www.redcross.org/take-a-class/school-programs If your willing to volunteer in your community for Disaster Training and preparedness you should be able to get that training for free also. http://www.redcross.org/take-a-class/disaster-training Hope this helps.

                              Dale

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