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  • Human Mange???

    I wasn't sure where to post this...

    A couple of nights ago, I had a new patient come in....he was not completely oriented, and at one point, he peed and crapped all over the bed, and himself, ripped off his hospital gown and his heart monitor, and jumped out of bed....this set off the bed alarm, so I came running....major clean-up ensued....

    I had to stick him in the shower to clean him up.....OMG..... he had something wrong with his skin.....all over his butt and in between his thighs and his crotch area.... I have never seen anything like it..... the RN had never seen anything like it, and THAT freaked me out even more.... she's not a new RN..... she's seen a lot....

    All I can say is that it looked like mange that you see on a dog.....the rest of his entire body was covered in small scabs, like chicken pox.....

    This skin disease is not the reason he was admitted....he had a build up of fluid in his abdominal cavity.....

    I'm most afraid that when I go back to work tonite, that I will find him now in isolation..... I did have gloves on when I was bathing him, but......

    :(

  • #2
    Ok, after doing some research online, in my highly untrained medical opinion, I think it's scabies.... I have never seen it up close and personal before.... but it makes sense..... it's supposed to be fairly common in nursing homes.....

    I'm going to mention it to the charge RN tonite.....

    I wonder if scabies will be another rampant problem in a SHTF situation, with people huddled together in emergency camps and little to no sanitation? I wonder if the influx of illegal immigrants are carrying it with them across the border? Be interesting to see once school starts up again if there is an outbreak due to the illegal kids being dumped into our schools.

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    • #3
      That was a lovely story Ms Amy, thanks for the visuals. I'm sufficiently creeped out to have breakfast now... ;)

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      • #4
        Lol Cap!
        Thanks Amy, something else to ponder.
        Illegals, another kettle of fish. There is a new Twitter bot that acts as a thesaurus, making suggestions for words other than "Illegal immigrant". Apparent some of the trespassing parasites are getting offended.
        I'm living your dreams!

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        • #5
          OmGosh.

          As I eat my corn flakes, I reflect on this post. Corn flakes..... Corn flakes


          Corn...F......l....a....k....e.....s.....

          -Buggy
          I'm not a fatalist. I'm a realist.

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          • #6
            Amy,

            Scabies are really nasty little buggers and are contagious. Some are extremely contagious, like the Norwegian variety and can be contracted through contact with the individuals bedding. Good news, there is medicine available.

            Dale

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            • #7
              I can see many of you have never had much contact with the “Itch” as it was called when I was growing up and I dare say you have no idea how it was dealt with then. Believe me it has been around forever and still lurks in this entire nation. If immigrants brought it in, it was the ones on the Mayflower or shortly thereafter.
              As soon as anyone showed the slightest symptoms (usually on the hands) my grandmother and mother would mix up some lard and powdered sulfur. This was applied liberally to the infected areas and red spots 3 or 4 times a day and the entire body at night. The unfortunate patient was assigned his own towel and wash pan set apart from the rest of the family. His bed was carefully striped, each corner of the bottom sheet was untucked and pulled to the center, making a big bundle. This bundle was carried into the yard, the wash pot set up, water carried and a fire built. Lye soap was shaved into the pot and the bottom and top sheets were boiled, along with any “small clothes” (aka undergarments) wash cloths and towels the family had used since the last laundry day. The remaining bedding was then washed along with the rest of the families dirty clothing. The unfortunate’s bed mate (small house, 7 kids) was gone over with a fine tooth comb for signs of “infestation” as well. While the wash was being my Dad and Grand Pa questioned the unfortunate about where and with whom he had been over the past few weeks to get to the source of the “infestation” and which friends or relatives should be on the lookout for the beginnings. Hand washing became fevered.
              My grandmother preferred to wash the bedding, towels and such every three days but most times this was impractical or impossible so the unfortunate slept with his hands bagged and the bags wash daily along with his towel and small clothes in his private wash pan and scalded (a kettle of boiling water poured over them). This continued until all signs were gone for 3 days. The bagging of the hands served 2 purposes. It reduced the scratching in sleep and contained the mites, reducing the likely hood of transmission and infestation of the bed clothes again. I don't know what they did if other areas of the body were infested.

              The lard and sulfur did work.. I don’t remember how long it took to cure and I do know a doctor was consulted if at all possible if it didn’t get better after a couple of months.

              Needless to say this was a LOT of work. Now days hot water and a hot dryer makes the washing soooo much easier and the RX cream if properly used can eliminate the mites in a few days. However it still takes up to 4 or 6 weeks for the skin to heal from the burrows and reactions to the mites. And you will continue to itch.

              The only way to avoid it is to avoid contact with anyone who might have it. That can be difficult, especially if you work in a hospital, daycare center, or another crowded environment where the disease often breaks out. Good hygiene isn't a guarantee that you'll be able to avoid scabies, but it can help: People who bathe or shower regularly, wash their clothes after one or two wearings, and avoid sharing hats, combs, and even headphones may be less likely to make the acquaintance of the horrid mites. It's important to practice safe sex, too.

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              • #8
                Nasty stuff. Haven't heard about this in a long time.
                Amy be careful and keep your hands washed. When you go home, wash your clothes in the hottest water that you can safely wash them in and then high setting in dryer.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ZAGran View Post

                  The only way to avoid it is to avoid contact with anyone who might have it. That can be difficult, especially if you work in a hospital, daycare center, or another crowded environment where the disease often breaks out. Good hygiene isn't a guarantee that you'll be able to avoid scabies, but it can help: People who bathe or shower regularly, wash their clothes after one or two wearings, and avoid sharing hats, combs, and even headphones may be less likely to make the acquaintance of the horrid mites. It's important to practice safe sex, too.
                  Hmmm spending 4 nites a week in hotels all I thought I had to worry about was bed bugs and unsanitary conditions. Thanks for adding to the list Z... :confused:
                  I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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                  • #10
                    Ok, you all ready for this?

                    It's a fungal infection of the skin, AKA, Jock Itch!!!!

                    Jesus, Mary and Joseph!!! Jock itch looks like THAT?????!!!!! It literally covers his entire butt! It looks like someone took a flame thrower to his ass and then used a cheese grater on it.

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                    • #11
                      Must have been on some crazy drugs 'cause I'd think that'd hurt like hell. Can't even imagine that being all over and trying to put on a pair of drawers. OUCH!!
                      I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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                      • #12
                        Aaagggghhhhh!!!! It gets worse! They're putting him in isolation cause they're not sure what he has!!!!! I feel the need to run myself through a car wash!!!!!!!

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                        • #13
                          And maybe skinny dip in a tub of hand sanitizer...
                          I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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                          • #14
                            Stop by every afternoon Ms Amy and I'll check you over head to toe.... I'm glad when I can help out. Old folks still got a purpose!

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                            • #15
                              Amy, Hope it's not anything serious. I remember several things from medical training that looked like what your describing but none of them were "nice". Impetigo and small pox come to mind. Stay safe.

                              Dale

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