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For all those that ask is reloading worth it

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  • For all those that ask is reloading worth it

    Bottom line is yes.
    Q: Can you save money reloading.

    A: Yes. Ex:
    My .38 special.
    Brass is collected from range = free
    Wolf primers are $20.00 / 1000 = $2.00 / 100 rounds
    Powder is $30/ lb = $1.00 / 100 rounds
    Bullets (Boolits) = free cast from lead

    So I can make 100 rounds of .38 special for $3.00
    100 rounds of 9mm for $3.25
    100 rounds of .45 for $4.00
    If I shoot lead out of my rifles, they are $5-$6 / 100 rounds


    Equipment needed:
    (I'm going budget here.)
    Lee press and kit
    $120.00 (you can get the hand presses even cheaper, $30-$40)
    $20 die set
    $25 mold
    $40 melter

    This is about the bare bones set up. You can save a few more bucks using the hand press. This is for one caliber. Every caliber after will need a new die set and new mold.

    You can get lead from wheel weights or from taking it off the berm where you shoot. (Free)

    So for $200 +- you can reload all you want. It will pay for itself quick.


    The Real Truth:
    I have never saved a dollar reloading. I do have 4 presses (one being a high dollar Dillon) And 30+ molds. I do shoot a hell of a lot though.

  • #2
    The savings is great, even if you do not cast your own. Not only that, you can develop loads for each firearm, thus improving accuracy. I load a lot.

    You also save money if you shoot oddball rounds. I shoot 7.5 x 55. I make my own. And 30 carbine is friggin expensive. I make my own for that too.

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    • #3
      I've heard that you can only reload the same shells up to 3 times before they become too weak to withstand the force. Is this true? Thinking about setting up for my .45.
      "Reject the basic assumptions of civilization, especially the importance of material possessions." "The things you own end up owning you"-Tyler Durden

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Visinedrops View Post
        I've heard that you can only reload the same shells up to 3 times before they become too weak to withstand the force. Is this true? Thinking about setting up for my .45.

        Not true.


        .

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        • #5
          I've got brass that I know I've reloaded at least 50 times (probably alot more).
          Home from range, brass goes right to tumbler. Later on, same brass comes out to be reloaded. Back into range bag and back to gun.

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          • #6
            ) Originally Posted by Visinedrops View Post
            I've heard that you can only reload the same shells up to 3 times before they become too weak to withstand the force. Is this true? Thinking about setting up for my .45.)'
            Brass life depends on a lot of variables, load, cartridge pressure, action type ect. The higher power the load the lower the case life. If you're speaking of 45acp or even 45 colt, these calibers both generate pretty low pressure and are very easy on brass. Ive loaded both calibers extensively and I don't think Ive ever "worn out" a case in these calibers. The same goes for .38 special (with the exception of nickel cases which seem to crack after they are re-sized a few times.). High power rifle cases on the other hand get worked much harder, especially in semi-auto rifles (.223 , 308) the bottleneck cases expand and contract alot more, have to be trimmed to length much more often that straight-walled lower powered cases. In my experience cases like .223 and .308 fired in semi-auto rifles generally have a life expectancy of 3-5 loadings, here again depending somewhat on the load being used, lite loads= better case life.
            Hope that helps!

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            • #7
              Yeah, what morguns said.

              If you are loading high pressure loads all the time, your brass life will be shortened. (Not to mention your barrel life) Most of the time, the hottest,fastest load isn't the most accurate. I'd rather hit at 1100 fps than miss at 1400 fps. analyze your needs. Do you really need your .30-06 to touch upon 3000fps to hit a paper target 100 yds away. What I'm trying to say is: you don't need to load the absolute most powerful load for your gun.

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              • #8
                My 30 06 works best with a 150 grain bullet going about 3000 fps. I have a huge supply of military brass made during WWII. U43. It is tedious to remove that damn primer crimp. But we were fighting a war then, 1943, that we wern't sure we were going to win. So the people that made that brass made it as best they could. I have loaded some of that brass half a dozen times with no problems. As far as I know, when loaded to reasonable velocities, 45 and 38 brass lasts forever. 357 Magnum and 44 Magnum do not.
                Those who would trade freedom for security will end up with neither.

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                • #9
                  reloading can save you money but I just think it is a great hobby and I love doing it and have a ton of fun.

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                  • #10
                    I didn't save any money but I did get to shoot a lot more for the same amount of money.
                    WE DIDN'T BELIEVE THOSE WHO HAD SWORN TO KILL US 9-11-01

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                    • #11
                      Brass can be reloaded many times....the determining factors are how hot are you loading......how tight is your chamber......what was the quality of the brass to begin with.

                      Most important thing is to do a visual inspection to look for cracks and fractures....it's not even that they wont work....but the powder may become compromised quicker....and the bullet may not seat well....which may lead to a failure to fire.
                      Live like you'll die tomorrow, learn like you'll live forever.

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                      • #12
                        Maybe one day we will become good enough friends that you could teach me... this is one of those skills I am sorely lacking in :)
                        Deja Moo: The feeling that you've heard this bull before.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Arak Zantara View Post
                          Maybe one day we will become good enough friends that you could teach me... this is one of those skills I am sorely lacking in :)
                          Get new reloading manuals and read them first will give you an Idea how to start I went with R.C.B.S. rock chucker kit years ago all of it is still in use . You will add other tools as you become familiar with reloading but books first Nosler,Hornady,Sierra, all put out good reloading manuals get a couple get started.
                          WE DIDN'T BELIEVE THOSE WHO HAD SWORN TO KILL US 9-11-01

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                          • #14
                            The book ABCs of reloading is a great book on the subject for those considering reloading.


                            http://www.amazon.com/ABCs-Reloading.../dp/0873491904

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                            • #15
                              Absolutley we are set up to reload all primary calibers. And I hand load all our hunting ammo. But if you shop carefully you can get good deals at gunbroker.com A seller there sportsmansupply user name has auctions on case lots with free shippng to lower 48. Last week I got 5000 rds remington 22 lr hollow points $155.00 delivered they came yesterday
                              You don't have to be perfect, but you better be smart!!!

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