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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    First I would like to discuss powders. I would like to say, that powders are not interchangeable. You will note the below reloading data for the 300 Weatherby Mag. Notice that the minimum load for a 130 Gr bullet using 4831 is 83.1 grains. You willl notice that the maximum load for IMR 4064 is 73.3 grains. If you load 83.1 grains of 4064 because you read the data wrong, you will be buying a new rifle. And, with this caliber, this could cost you lots of money. Read your data, double check it, and make sure you know it before proceeding. Another note, loading below minimum is as dangerous, if not more so then overloading. Even though most of us preppers are known for being somewhat non-conformists, this is one case that you need to stay between the lines!!!!


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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    Here are the four components needed to make your new ammo. The first item is reloading powder. The second are new primers. The third items needed are projectiles, and the fourth is your cleaned brass (more on that later).

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    Today, I am going to discuss the components "PARTS" needed for reloading. Again, I must stress, a reloading manual is a must to make your own ammo. Probably the first question crossing your mind is, "Why would I want to make ammo? Can't I blow my firearm up?" And I always answer: NO, as long as you load properly and use a firearm that is in good shape. It is cheaper, and in my opinion, safer. I know that I am loading my ammo, and I have no idea what kind of day the person in the ammo plant is having. He could be drunk, or high, or hungover, or mad at the spouse.

    Folks usually then add, "But I do not know what powder to buy or what projectiles to use". Easy, get a manual and read what they suggest.

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  • Diesel
    replied
    feel better brother!

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    Sorry folks. Flu still has me down. Been unable to eat anything for 4 days now, and it is starting to take it's toll on me. I will try to get the components up tomorrow. I will drink another shot of Jaegermeister and go to bed.

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    Originally posted by Zombie Axe View Post
    Good Job RS :D You can tell that equipment sees a lot of use. About got enough brass ready to go for a run myself:cool:
    \
    Brass has never been short for me. I used to sell it for a living. I have a lifetime supply.

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  • Zombie Axe
    replied
    Good Job RS :D You can tell that equipment sees a lot of use. About got enough brass ready to go for a run myself:cool:

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    Next time, when I get over my Jagermeister hangover, I will go over the componanents needed for reloading. Merry Christmas all.

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    The next items are luxury items that just make reloading easier. Buy them at leisure.

    THis is an auto primer. Makes life easy. Not sure what they sell for new, but I bought this used at an estate auction for $5.00.




    This is a case lube pad, used for getting case lube onto your cases. Not necessarily needed, but really helpful.



    These 2 tools are a funnel for dumping powder into your cases, and a "decrimping" tool. Military brass has a crimp around it that MUST be removed before replacing the primer. I put this as luxury item, because you will not need to load military brass, but often saves money.

    The funnel is almost a needed item, but you can live without it if needed. It only costs $5.00 or less. I paid less then a dollar at an auction.



    This is a fancy shell holder. My original was made with a piece of wood that I drilled holes in, but I got this at an estate for 25 cents. It helps out for holding your shells while reloading.



    This is a case trimmer. Needed for long distance accuracy. I do not recommend this step for handgun rounds.



    And last, but not least, this is a tumbler for cleaning your brass. I own 8 of these little beauts, including a HUGE commercial sized one. I used to sell reloading brass, so I needed them. There are ways of cleaning your brass other then this, but it is the best way I have found.

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    Next Item is a must. 1/10 of a grain of powder can cause you to blow yourself to New Jersey. And nobody wants to go to New Jersey. A scale is a must. I use an RCBS 10-10-10. New they are about $100.00. I bought mine at an auction for $18.00. New in the box. You must have this or you are a fool.




    Remember, why buy new, when used will do?

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    The next item is a set of dies. Every caliber has its own set of dies. Rifle dies that are 30 caliber are not the same. a 30 carbine is not the same as a 30-30, or a 30-06 is not the same as a 308. All cartridges are different. I will go more into this on the next installment of my instructions. Lee Dies give you a set of shell holders. This is the small device that slips into your loader and holds the shell in place as you reload. Some say that lee dies are inferior to RCBS dies. I own both. I recommend you blowing the dust off your wallet and paying $30.00 and buying a set of shell holders.


    Here is a set of Lee Dies for my 7.5 x 55 Swiss. Dies are available for just about any caliber out there. And if you have an oddball (and I do mean oddball) you can have a set made from RCBS. Dies should run you under $25.00 used. If you are buying pistol calibres, I recommend "carbide" dies. More on that later.

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    Item next is a press. I am an old fashioned kind of 40 something, so I prefer the RCBS rockchucker. I got this from my Dad many moons ago. There have been millions of rounds loaded through it, and it is as good (if not as clean) as it was from day one. The new one have a handle that is amidexdrious for you south paws. There are fancy ones on the market, and some simple ones on the market. I prefer simple. There are also the old timey Lee Handy loaders. I have a couple for "prep" purposes, but have never used mine. It is an antique collector item.



    It would work in a pinch if needed.




    And, yes, I know my stuff is dusty. I cannot explain the pure joy of living in a place where sand and dust storms are a weekly occurance. I even rented a storage facility where my stuff has been stored for the last few months. Dust proof my a$$.
    Last edited by Rustyshakelford; 12-04-2008, 04:58 PM.

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    The first and most important item is a reloading manual. I stress, this is a must. I have a Hornady manual, but any will do. The first 1/4 of the book will explain the loading process, and is a must before doing ANYTHING. PERIOD. Speer makes one, WInchester makes one, but I prefer the Hornady. Mine is an older manual, but the information is still good for the cartridges I load. I repaeat. Do not NOT start loading without a manual.

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    As promised, I will start my pictorial on reloading this evening. I am out of the oil patch for a few days, but will make this a multi part series due to my impatience. In the next few minutes I will start to describe, what I percieve as the "must haves" for the reloader. Bear with me, as I have a nasty stomach flu and have been self medicating on copious amouts of Jagermeister.

    ***Disclaimer***

    This info is for informational purposes only. If you do what an anonomous person says on a chat board, and you blow your self to smitherines, you are a fool and need to seek psychiatric help ASAP.

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  • Rustyshakelford
    replied
    Originally posted by nitehawg View Post
    Definitely interested, starting to start from scratch in the next coupla months.
    Very cool!! What calibre are you starting with?

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