Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Springfield XD subcompact

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Springfield XD subcompact

    Im trying to decide on which caliber to get. It looks like the subcompact 3" is definately going to be the size for concealed, but which caliber? The 9mm holds 13+1 with the compact clip, and 16+1 with the larger clip that uses the spacer. The .40 holds 9+1 with the compact and 12+1 with the extention.

    My question here is how does the .40 compare with the 9mm? If there is not that big of a penetrating and speed difference, then I might as well go with the 9mm due to cheaper ammo and it will hold more.

  • #2
    I don't think you'll be wrong with either caliber. The reviews that I've read on both the 9 and the 40 are all positive. Even though the .40 throws heavier lead, oddly, the recoil is reported to be very manageable and even comparable to the 9mm. I have noticed that, in my area at least, .40 ammunition is very easy to find. The 9mm is still somewhat scarce at times.
    The 9mm will have a higher muzzle velocity and some might criticize the round for over penetration, ie small hole in... small hole out, where as the .40 moving slower, and carrying more weight will create a larger wound cavity.
    Both rounds will get the job done though, and the higher capacity of the 9 is always to be considered.


    Keep us posted on what you choose!
    Last edited by slowz1k; 03-25-2010, 04:36 PM.
    The 12ga.... It's not just for rabbits anymore.

    Comment


    • #3
      .45 all the way! I owned a Springfield XD in .45 caliber before I smartly traded it for my Officers model 1911 which I absolutely love! Collest handgun Ive owned to date! The XD was nice, and the recoil wasn't bad at all. I did like the double stack magazine: 13+1 in the pipe. Thats quite formidable.
      Now if you're looking for some quality smaller weapons for concealed carry I would suggest looking into Kel Tec. They are an American company that is based in Florida. I have owned and shot a bunch of different guns in different calibers made by them and am pretty impressed. I personally own a Kel Tec P32 pocket pistol and I love the thing. You can be wearing nothing but swim trunks and hide this thing completely. Also their customer service is just phenomenal! kel-tec-cnc.com

      Comment


      • #4
        With the 9 mm, one thing you ought to realize is it doesn't have the penetration / stopping power of the .40. I mean, I have a 9 mm too, and I buy cheap ammo for plinking, but then I've got the +P+ stuff as well, 'cause that's what you want when it's killing time.

        Comment


        • #5
          Well I have decided to go with the 9mm. I like the fact that it will penetrate further than the .40. Im a good shot, so Im not worried about just how big the wound will be. Cant wait to get it, but have to wait on the permit.

          Comment


          • #6
            In all honestly you really cant go wrong with any caliber, since the only gun that will help you out of a bad situation is the one you have on you, which ultimately means whatever you are most comfortable carrying. Doesn't help you when its being left at home! This is why i traded out my XD. I didn't like how it felt when I had it on me concealed. To me it was uncomfortable and bulky. Of course it was the bigger .45 model. My 1911 is more comfy, believe it or not! 9mm is very accurate, has a bit more range due to its higher speeds, but it does tend to penetrate too much like slowz1k said: small hole in... small hole out. This makes for a lack of stopping power, meaning that the threat may keep right on coming instead of being knocked down.

            BUT, do some research on the different defensive rounds such as the hollow points, hydra-shocks, etc. that are available, and you'll find that these rounds will compensate nicely for the higher speeds and penetration of the 9mm. Any defensive round you get you do not want penetration so much as you want stopping power. Meaning that you want the projectile to grab tissue and cause as much internal damage as possible. The more trauma a threat sustains per shot, the less likely they are to keep coming your way. Of course you want to use as few bullets as possible to stop them as well, which is why so many people do go for .40 or .45 since they make so much more damage per shot than the smaller calibers. Look up some ballistics gel tests involving different calibers and you'll see what I mean. Higher penetration, depending on where it may be used, can cause collateral damage and as a civilian you have to consider that, since we aren't indemnified like cops are against shooting the wrong person. If, because of higher penetration, it goes right through a threat, you have to realize that it could feasibly keep going and hit an innocent, at which point you are liable! Keep that in mind when you are buying defensive rounds and look for maximum expansion. Just some food for thought :)

            Comment


            • #7
              I decided on the 9mm 3". It is a great looking gun, but dont have anywhere to shoot it yet. What is with the shell casing in the envelope? I would assume that it has something to do with forensics, but seems nearly impossible to identify a gun from the rifling marks and the mark from the firing pin on the primer.

              Comment


              • #8
                Spent shell casing is just from the test fired round at the factory. I am sure all bullets are removed from ballistic gel so they can have your barrels rifling on file(not sure about this but who knows). Firing pins do leave traceable marks but i dont think much is put into it as it it im sure not nearly as accurate as barrel rifling. But good choice on the 9mm sub. I love mine and have a great crossbreeds IWB holster for CC. The factory holster is ok but you may want to look into a paddle holster if you do alot of open carry.
                ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

                Comment


                • #9
                  I got a Blackhawk Serpa Concealment Sportster Holster. It is called a concealment holster, but is open carry. Im not looking to conceal right now, so when I do conceal, this will be my range holster.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As far as ammo goes, you might want to take a close look at the Hornady Critical Defense ammo. The 9mm hollowpoints were developed for rapid expansion to increase stopping power and limit over-penetration. Better knockdown and less collateral liability. The rounded polymer tip is also supposed to feed more reliably than flat-tipped hollowpoints. It is also less likely to get clogged with heavy clothing fibers (i.e. denim or leather), which have been known to interfere with proper mushrooming.

                    I haven't had a chance to actually test this ammo myself, but it looks like it's worth consideration.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X