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if shtf, the pistol wont amount to a hill of beans.

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  • #31
    Same as when I went on my EOD course in '85, a fair percentage of the reference books regarding building IED's came from the wacky left wing, "victim" trash.

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    • #32
      I took the course up here in Canada. While it was not PC to be running it. It regained military correctness after 02 and Afg was on.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Garand View Post
        Same as when I went on my EOD course in '85, a fair percentage of the reference books regarding building IED's came from the wacky left wing, "victim" trash.
        Ah, The Anarchist Cookbook which is about as handy as the Ranger's Handbook.



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        • #34
          That was one of them

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Garand View Post
            That was one of them
            There are more.

            Actually, there are Army manuals on those exact subjects online. They are obsolete for the Army.
            Those manuals are no different than reading John Plaster's Ultimate Sniper book. It will not ever make one a sniper.


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            • #36
              There's more skills to being a sniper, long range musketry is just one facet. Theres individual movement, cam and concealment, observation & reporting, stalking, etc. It's a big list to master, but every body seems to focus on shooting.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Armyjimbo View Post
                There's more skills to being a sniper, long range musketry is just one facet. Theres individual movement, cam and concealment, observation & reporting, stalking, etc. It's a big list to master, but every body seems to focus on shooting.
                Definitely more skills are required to be a sniper than a BR shooter.

                Here, it was called putting on the burlap, the US basis of a Ghillie suit.

                Even with shooting, the distances aren't known and no range flags. I'd imagine today's sniper's have laser range measuring devices and anemometers to measure "near wind." Back in the day, they had the dots and guess-ti-mated wind by movements of vegetation.

                Although, it requires a lot of practice and skill; shooting is the easiest skill to acquire. Not being detected before and especially after the shot is a lot more challenging.






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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Tugaloo View Post

                  Definitely more skills are required to be a sniper than a BR shooter.

                  Here, it was called putting on the burlap, the US basis of a Ghillie suit.

                  Even with shooting, the distances aren't known and no range flags. I'd imagine today's sniper's have laser range measuring devices and anemometers to measure "near wind." Back in the day, they had the dots and guess-ti-mated wind by movements of vegetation.

                  Although, it requires a lot of practice and skill; shooting is the easiest skill to acquire. Not being detected before and especially after the shot is a lot more challenging.


                  Using the mildots is still used, and up until recently anemometers were not an issue piece of kit for the course. So the candidates had to figure wind drift all on their own. My experience is dated, took course in 90's got out 10+ yrs ago. Times move on. I don't own an LRF but still depend on mil dots/ guesstimenting the range. Hard lessons learned don't fade easy.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Armyjimbo View Post
                    Using the mildots is still used, and up until recently anemometers were not an issue piece of kit for the course. So the candidates had to figure wind drift all on their own. My experience is dated, took course in 90's got out 10+ yrs ago. Times move on. I don't own an LRF but still depend on mil dots/ guesstimenting the range. Hard lessons learned don't fade easy.
                    I use the mildot system.

                    IMO, it is not that difficult to learn how if someone who knows how shows you.

                    There are so many things that can provide range estimation. The rims on vehicles, power poles, people's waist up or down, windows or doors have standard sizes. The distance between a deer's withers and the bottom of its rib cage. Averages yes, but close enough


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                    • #40
                      Practice, practice, practice. Yup that's what it takes. Ask Jerry Miculek some of his shooting is "trick" shooting according to some, but I'm pretty sure I would not want to be pitted against him armed with just a pistol and me with a long gun.

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                      • #41
                        Armyjimbo,
                        Back when Jerry Miculek used a revolver set a new record speed at the bowling pin challenge; how he did it was a stroke of genius and practice.
                        After he shot the first pin while moving to the second pin; he was already squeezing the trigger.

                        4-time 2nd Chance Bowling Pin Champion
                        1997, 2007, 2011 World Shoot-Off Champion (The only person to ever win this title with a revolver.)
                        There was an article online where he explained how he did it.
                        BTW, that is the best example of Gun Control... ROFL

                        He is one of the fastest revolver shooters in the world, capable of emptying a five-shot revolver in 0.57 seconds in a group the size of a playing card.
                        https://www.hornady.com/team-hornady.../jerry-miculek

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