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How do you measure the LOP?

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  • How do you measure the LOP?

    I'm not a fan of the standard M-4 style collapsable stock on my AR. Don't get me wrong. There's nothing wrong with that style, and I even use on on my 12 ga that I love. I just want a more solid feel on the rifle, so I plan to install a fixed unit. My question is how is the LOP determined? From end of stock to receiver? From end of stock to trigger? or something else?

    Thanks.
    The 12ga.... It's not just for rabbits anymore.

  • #2
    :D OMG - Lop?? I pictured measuring from the belt to the belly button - or something...

    Going quietly away, now...
    "If Howdy Doody runs against him, I'm voting for the puppet." - SkyOwl's Wife, 2012

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    • #3
      Originally posted by slowz1k View Post
      I'm not a fan of the standard M-4 style collapsable stock on my AR. Don't get me wrong. There's nothing wrong with that style, and I even use on on my 12 ga that I love. I just want a more solid feel on the rifle, so I plan to install a fixed unit. My question is how is the LOP determined? From end of stock to receiver? From end of stock to trigger? or something else?

      Thanks.
      A good rule of thumb to follow concerning measuring Length of Pull (LOP):

      Bend shooting arm in a 90 degree position
      Palm of shooting hand should be open
      Measure from center of palm to end of forearm (Arms Pivot Point)
      This measurement is a close approximation of your LOP
      Keep in mind that heavy clothing may change this slightly.

      Another way is to grasp the firearm's stock or pistol grip in the shooting hand and rest the stock against the pivot point of forearm (inside of portion of elbow). You will find the results are very similar to the previous recommendation. This method works very well when measuring new or un-installed stocks. Good Luck.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Skyowl's Wife View Post
        :D OMG - Lop?? I pictured measuring from the belt to the belly button - or something...

        Going quietly away, now...
        LOL :eek:

        Thanks Bayou Blaster,
        That's good to know.... and was very accurate when I tried it. Turns out the stock I wanted probably won't be available until spring of 2012 :mad: Of course I exagerate, but everyone seems to be really backed up right now. I did find a "plain jane" A-2 stock that should be here on Thursday. I'll give it a shot, until the Ace gets in.
        The 12ga.... It's not just for rabbits anymore.

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        • #5
          Glad the measurement worked out for you. It's never failed me yet. At most the difference has been 1/2 inch max (Negligible).

          Concerning the A2 stock: Make sure it comes with the buffer tube and buffer tube spacer. Yeah that ACE brand stock in the pic is nice. ACE makes good products.

          I like the 6 position stock myself for several reasons:
          1. You can change LOP easier to compensate for heavier clothing.
          2. Family members can adjust LOP if they have to use it.
          3. You can change a scopes eye relief without having to remount/adjust a scope. Again family members in mind. Avoid neck strain that way.
          4. Collapses for easier storage (Great for smaller rifle cases) especially carbine length models.

          But I agree it's not for everyone.
          Good Luck.

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          • #6
            Well I changed my mind..... Again. The solid feel of the A2 style stock was good, but I can see the value of a multi-positioned stock, especially considering bulkier clothes in the colder months. The wife has expressed interest in shooting it from time to time as well. This Magpul CRT knockoff seems (to me) to be the best of both worlds. It's very solid and far from being the "rattler" that I had before.


            The 12ga.... It's not just for rabbits anymore.

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            • #7
              nice gun thaanks for the length of pull lesson
              the pack that plays together stays together

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