Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Filipino Marine Scout Snipers

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Filipino Marine Scout Snipers

    The Filipino Marine Scout Snipers are using upgraded old M-16 rifles for sniping. What they did was take stock of their rifles and economic situation. Being a poor island nation they decided to make good use of what they had: surplus M-16 rifles and lots of the 5.56 ammo. For the most part, this is a really smart move on their part and has kind of set a new standard for sniping or designated riflemen.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_Scout_Sniper_Rifle


    https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...pers&FORM=IGRE


    http://military.wikia.com/wiki/Marin...t_Sniper_Rifle

    At the beginning, the Filipino Marine Snipers used a 3 by 9 Tasco scope for their first telescopic sight coupled with a 55 grain bullet. It worked pretty well for their beginning snipers. Later on they changed to a 62 grain bullet and different scopes. For the most part, the Filipino Marine Snipers have had no problem repeatedly hitting bad guys out to 750 meters. Over the last couple of years the style of the rifle has changed a bit with the addition of a modified chin rest and target triggers but the basic design remains the heart of the old M-16 rifle which many of us used in the military services over the years.

    Having been a sniper in Viet Nam and using a XM-21 sniper rifle, I like to urge people to have some sort of scope or red dot sight system on their rifles. Even a simple 4 power scope mounted on a rifle enhances the ability of a person to increase their overall accuracy or precision of shots when compared against somebody without a scoped rifle. A good scope system or red dot helps increase speed and accuracy which can help save your bacon in some situations when time is a necessity.

  • #2
    good info, thanks. Hits a bit close to home as I spent two years in the Philippines with the Peace Corps. And I definitely agree about getting comfortable with a red dot or low power scope on whatever rifle you are using.

    And, thanks for your service.
    Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm glad to hear the Marine Scout Snipers got better weapons. I spent half a year in the Philippines in the early 80's training the marines and chasing the NPA. Time flies.

      Dale
      Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by dalewick View Post
        I'm glad to hear the Marine Scout Snipers got better weapons. I spent half a year in the Philippines in the early 80's training the marines and chasing the NPA. Time flies.

        Dale
        Early 80's??? I was there 83-85, Ilocos Norte, Vintar. My barangay was Salsalamagui. We had NPA in the valley but I never had a problem with them. Peace Corps has a very good reputation regarding being there for pure technical support at the grass roots level. Yeah, lots of good memories; I keep in touch with the village, really wanting to return there again.
        Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by lalakai View Post

          Early 80's??? I was there 83-85, Ilocos Norte, Vintar. My barangay was Salsalamagui. We had NPA in the valley but I never had a problem with them. Peace Corps has a very good reputation regarding being there for pure technical support at the grass roots level. Yeah, lots of good memories; I keep in touch with the village, really wanting to return there again.
          I was mostly there in 84 and 85 as a tactical advisor and reconnaissance expert. We worked out of Subic mostly. I have some good memories of Olongapo City but I also saw enough evil to never want to return to the PI.

          Dale
          Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

          Comment


          • #6
            That was a huge advantage.....living in the remote areas; we just had to deal with corrupt politicians. As Peace Corps we lived with a family in the barangay, ate with them, worked with the villagers, celebrated birthdays, weddings, funerals, harvest feasts. I remember a couple times getting chewed out by Nanang for coming home late, drunk lol. Life in the big cities was very different and i could only tolerate it for a few days before having to leave. It surprised me, making me tremendously homesick, to be in Manila when a US ship would come in and the sailors would hit the bars. I wanted to talk with them, to reconnect with America.......but I was a civy and not part of their crowd. My wife and i have talked about possibly joining Peace Corps again after the last child is up and out and maybe we'll do that. But for us, the memories and experiences were great and I count that time as some of the most valuable and rewarding.
            Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

            Comment


            • #7
              Lalakai, It's good to hear there are Americans with good memories from that place and time. When I got orders to go, it was never good. That was the job and I volunteered to be that guy. Such is life.

              I hope things work out well for you and your wife. Good luck.

              Dale
              Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

              Comment


              • #8
                I Know that the USMC used 4x power scopes on their M-16. BUT the power was too low for urban areas where you might need to hit a target over 600 meters away. This they found in both in the sand box and stan. So now they used red dot and multi power scopes.

                Comment

                Working...
                X