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Ar-15 bolt selection

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  • Bayou Blaster
    replied
    Originally posted by neverknow View Post
    Bayou can i be your neighbor?
    LOL.:D Too funny.:D

    I just enjoy firearms as you have guessed by now. I like to try and help out people when and where I can. I'm no expert, just have accumulated alot of experience and knowledge acquired from a few very respected names in shooting and the firearms gunsmithing world.

    If I had gone with the wife to visit her brother in North Carolina where she is now. I would have enjoyed meeting you and shooting the breeze.:)
    Last edited by Bayou Blaster; 07-24-2009, 12:38 PM.

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  • neverknow
    replied
    Bayou can i be your neighbor?

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  • Bayou Blaster
    replied
    If the dimensions are the same, the titanium firing pins should not puncture the primer. If however you have severly worn parts (bolt or barrel extension) this might happen, though doubtful. Some primers are lighter than others. Generally military ammunition primers are harder than standard primers. This is especially so with Russian ammunition. If concerned just get a standard milspec firing pin as a spare. The problem with firing pins is that they tend to stretch and break from prolonged dry firing. That's why I recommend snap caps.

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  • neverknow
    replied
    Bayou im glad you brought that up i was going to ask about titanium fireing pin but i heard it would puncture primers. And im ordering a newer colt 6920 lower for my rifle that is milspec, So i would use my original as a backup

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  • Bayou Blaster
    replied
    Originally posted by neverknow View Post
    The only reason i ask is if the @#%& hits the fan if i can at all make it more reliable and easier to clean im willing to pay the money now while i have the funds and keep my regular bolt as a back up
    I think it's a great idea to keep a fully assembled spare bolt when utilizing this firearm. AR-15 bolt lugs and extractors have been known to break. I would also consider a spare firing pin (titianum) and a firing pin retaining pin as well. If bugging-in a lower reciever rebuild kit would not hurt to keep around. Remember Murphy's Law.

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  • Bayou Blaster
    replied
    Originally posted by methusaleh View Post
    I seem to remember a huge deal being made to not swap bolts between rifles. I don't remember the reason, but why may that be a concern? This was with the Army, so maybe it was just something the DIs taught us for some reason...
    They may have been concerned with a Head Spacing issue. Most AR-15/M-16 platforms don't have an issue with headspacing unless the bolt or barrel extension are severly worn. In any case one only has to purchase a set of headspacing guages to confirm if the firearm is safe to fire.

    The other issue that they may have been concerned with is that the bolts utilize 3 gas rings, similiar to the piston rings in a car engine. These rings will wear to a particular bolt carrier. Swapping the bolts may effect gas pressure and thus the firearms ability to function reliably. To check if the gas rings on an AR-15 variant are still good:

    Remove Bolt and Carrier as a complete assembly from the firearm.
    Grasp Bolt Carrier in one hand and pull/extend Bolt with the other hand.
    Carefully place face of Bolt on table supporting weight of Bolt Carrier (Vertically on Table).
    If Bolt Carrier collaspes unto the Bolt then the Gas Rings should be replaced.
    Index new rings so gaps are at least 90 degrees apart.

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  • neverknow
    replied
    The only reason i ask is if the @#%& hits the fan if i can at all make it more reliable and easier to clean im willing to pay the money now while i have the funds and keep my regular bolt as a back up

    Leave a comment:


  • methusaleh
    replied
    I seem to remember a huge deal being made to not swap bolts between rifles. I don't remember the reason, but why may that be a concern? This was with the Army, so maybe it was just something the DIs taught us for some reason...

    Leave a comment:


  • Bayou Blaster
    replied
    Originally posted by neverknow View Post
    Ok another damn question, the bolt carriers on the market chromelined and phosphate which is better and are they better then the regular milspec ar bolts?
    Besides the magnesium phoshate bolts and carriers on the market, several manufacturers offer these bolts and carriers either chromed or titianum nitrite finished. While many people will say there is no advantage to these alternative platings they do offer more lubricity when running the firearm hard over a prolonged period without major cleaning. This is it's biggest advantage. I've seen AR-15 type variants run longer without major cleaning when using chromed bolts and carriers. The bolts and carriers are much easier to clean as well. If you take good care of your firearms and they are running reliably now, I would then leave well enough alone.

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  • neverknow
    started a topic Ar-15 bolt selection

    Ar-15 bolt selection

    Ok another damn question, the bolt carriers on the market chromelined and phosphate which is better and are they better then the regular milspec ar bolts?
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