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  • cwconnertx
    replied
    I am also getting a reloading setup for the 308 and 50.

    That should help with the high cost of the heavier stuff.

    Its good to have options.

    Leave a comment:


  • SandHillsHillbilly
    replied
    In my situation it was a need or a want to train 2 teenager step daughters how to shoot without investing in another caliber. The best way I thought to do so was build some 22 cal ARs for them. This would give the same feel (except recoil) as a standard AR. While I was developing a training plan for them I decided since I already had a 9mm why not build some 9mm ARs as well. So it has become like stair steps for them and makes it exciting (keeps them interested). They have already been eyeing my ARs and one is drooling over my AR10. There is shotguns and pistols mixed into the plan. I have managed to limit myself to 5 calibers 22, 223, 308, 9mm, 40 and still cover training economically.

    Think about it. If the crap really hit the fan what calibers are you going to find out there on the street.

    Leave a comment:


  • cwconnertx
    replied
    The only thing about shotguns is they are not a good substitute for practicing with a rifle. Shotguns are great tools but different. I have no problem finding shotgun ammo or even pistol ammo to some degree. It is the price and availability of rifle ammo that has been my issue.

    Practice for me also involves other people, who are on my "team" but don't
    necessarily know it, but they get to practice and shoot with me. So even though I have my own rifles and ammo that I practice with, I am thinking of other weapons for other people that are a bit cheaper to shoot.

    I decided I am going with a 5.45 upper for an AR. I also decided against adding 7.62x39 to the collection.

    So what to consider next?

    Leave a comment:


  • denvernative321
    replied
    caliber problem

    what about shotguns i see no mention of them. ammo is still plentiful in all calibers, cheap and fun to practice with.

    Leave a comment:


  • Northphx602
    replied
    Originally posted by cwconnertx View Post
    Ok, so It has generally been my viewpoint that sticking to as few calibers as possible is best, since it is easier to stock up and keep an adequate supply. Lately I have been having second thoughts due to the massive price increases in some of the caliber I use. By no means am I thinking about dumping any of the weapons I have now, I am quite fond of them, but I currently use .223, 308, 30-06, and 50BMG in my rifles. 223 and 308 in particular have become harder to find in quantity. I certainly have a decent supply if i need to defend the castle, but I have reached the point where I don't want to use much of it to train since it is difficult to replace.

    I have been considering getting some AR-15 upper recievers in a few new calibers. Maybe 5.45 and 7.62x39 since I can still find these fairly reasonably and shoot them for training purposes. My new thinking is that with more calibers perhaps I can shoot cheaper, plus will have capability to shoot whatever is available if it becomes even more of an issue.

    I just don't know whether to stick to a few and make stocking easier, or add a few and have the capability to shoot more different things. Any thoughts?
    I concur with what some of the folks are saying regarding staying with the .223, .308 and some of the others you have. I have more than a few years training people with a myriad of training budgets, what I can tell you is keep what you have but you will still need to train. I suggest you spend more time on dry firing, up drills, reloads, malfunctions, transitions and the like can all be done for hours a month and you are not only saving money on bullets you are ironing out some of your personal challenges you may have (you may be weak on transitioning from your primary weapon, rifle, to your secondary, pistol. Train in the day, with any tactical vest you may have, transition from the standing, kneeling, the from and from cover.

    You can dry fire with a pastie on the wall of your garage (ensure you clear all firearms before you do it). video yourself and perform a self critique. In Iraq (Al Anbar) Insurgent snipers were trained to shoot coalition forces with air rifles and bottle caps, they then cut out loopholes and the learned how to shoot from a concealed position (inside of a home, or inside of a trunk), they shot thousands of pellets in a week, inside of their back yards, all the while we let them keep the pellet rifles because they said they shot birds to eat them.

    "Training and the ability to obtain your desired end state is only limited by your innovation and ability to embrace your circumstances and use them to your advantage"..not quoted by anyone famous, just me.

    Leave a comment:


  • cwconnertx
    replied
    At least around here the combloc stuff is still available and cheaper

    I would probably buy the ammo before the weapon, that is what I did with other calibers.

    I have 22 pistols and rifles, but it isn't quite the same, I do use it a lot though.

    Leave a comment:


  • jetskrtal
    replied
    I have stuck w/ the current military calibers 5.56/.223 7.62x51/.308
    but also have a ton of
    7.62x39
    7.62x54r
    5.45x39
    9mm
    .22
    12 guage
    The big plus w/ the combloc calibers WAS that they WERE cheaper,but those days are long gone.

    Leave a comment:


  • group2lt
    replied
    Rifle Calibers

    Well, like most of you I have een trying to maintain an adequate supply while maintaining my skills. In Massachusetts that tends to be difficult. What I have been doing, and this is simply my way, is I have purchased and stock what the majority of police depts in my area use. These being AR-15 .223 and either Sigs or Glocks in .40 S&W. Additionally I have two close friends who own the same weapons as I do there by increasing our compatability. We can exchange ammo, mags and parts. We purchase for each other and keep a similar stock of what we shoot. It seems to work reasonably well. I ma just hoping that other than range days, I never have to put it to the test.

    Leave a comment:


  • beebopcop
    replied
    IMHO the time for this sort of play is past. Stock up on the ammo that you need in the calibers that you need. If you don't have a .22 pistol and rifle, get one. Then you can practice until your heart is content. Be advised that .22 is getting hard to get also, so do it now. Buy enough for practice and enough for barter. I know that it is better to practice with the actual weapon that you will be using in a given situation but it is really getting to the point of having to do with what you have.
    bbc

    Leave a comment:


  • Lil Bear
    replied
    I was thinking the same thing. I am wanting a new weapon, but can not decide on whether to get a new caliber or just double up on the amount of weapons that can shoot the same caliber. I will probably do the latter in a 30-30 or 223- something my wife can use.

    Lil Bear

    Leave a comment:


  • cwconnertx
    replied
    I'm not suggesting I am going to get rid of 223 or 308, I have some pretty slick hardware set up in those calibers, only that instead of sticking to my past procedure of minimizing the number of calibers I use, i was thinking of adding some.

    Disadvantage
    - more calibers to stock up on
    - less parts commonality in weapons

    Advantage
    - cheaper ammo for practice
    - can use whatever is available easier

    Leave a comment:


  • Emmet Fitz-Hume
    replied
    calibers

    I'm like most of you guys. I have narrowed my calibers (both pistol and rilfe) to just a few, and buy bulk when availbable. As for the .223, purchase the Ciener .22LR conversion drop in for your AR15. It's great when practicing reflexive fire CQC drills. When you want to practice longer shots go back to the regular .223 caliber.

    I've considered going to an 5.45x39 upper, but I'd rather spend that money on .223 ammo and accessories

    Leave a comment:


  • iceman
    replied
    just my .02

    I'll stick with the .223 and 308 as well. But having something new is always fun too....

    Leave a comment:


  • kenno
    replied
    I would recomend the 17 RF as rim fires will be the last to be outlawed

    Leave a comment:


  • TheLastMountainMan
    replied
    30-30s are cheap, plentiful, and you can use that for hunting and not use up your defense ammo.

    Leave a comment:

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