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  • orangetom1999
    replied
    by Tugaloo..

    I'm not a striker fire person. My money, so my opinion is the only one that counts.
    Amen on that!! Amen on that!!!



    I have a S&W .40 cal striker tool and It is ok...but I am accustomed to my .357 Mag. GP 100 and also my 1911. My Kimber has a very very nice trigger pull for a 1911...but the Charles Daley ..my other 1911 is also nice..but not quite up to the Kimber.
    I too am not partial to the striker fired types.

    Been Switching to my Charles Daley this weekend instead of my GP 100.

    This one here but without the fiber optic fron sight...never liked those. Prefer the standard metallic front sight.

    Charles Daly // 1911 Superior Grade Pistol (Blued) 45ACP/5"BBL

    Kimber..

    This one here..

    Kimber America | Custom TLE II

    I like it but it will not feed cast bullets. Mayhap if it is broken in a number or rounds down the road. It sure is tight. One can tell the difference in the two 1911s and the machine tolerances between the two. The Kimber is definitely tighter...definitely.

    I like a well made proven practical tool in anything..but am not into a lot of chrome or bling...no use for that.




    Orangetom
    Not an Ishmaelite.
    Last edited by orangetom1999; 10-01-2021, 12:38 PM.

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  • Tugaloo
    replied
    I celebrate diversity. My usual EDC choices range between CZ 97BD, CZ PO1 Omega, Browning High or Hi Power, 1911-A1 and S&W M 59. The 97 BD, PO1 Omega and the M 59 have decocker ability which is nice.

    Everyone has an opinion and mine is due to the heavy trigger pull weight, I'm not a striker fire person. My money, so my opinion is the only one that counts.

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  • Mangler
    replied
    I should have made clear that I was commenting on the weight of the loaded pistol, two spare magazines, and the holster. If I am off by several ounces so be it. My point is, for an overweight old man, it is not comfortable to carry at the beltline.

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  • registror
    replied
    Originally posted by Mangler View Post
    As an experiment, so I could become familiar with the realities of concealed carry, I carried my Taurus PT-11 .45 for a year. However, it was so cumbersome trying to be a responsible gun owner and try to effectively conceal carry a large frame 45 that I didn’t last six months.

    Every workday I had to leave the firearm in my vehicle. I was reluctant to leave a loaded gun protected by a pane of glass, so I unloaded and locked it each time. I could have purchased a safe for the car, but then I would need one for each vehicle.

    Going out for Friday night fish and a beer required me to leave it at home, because our law says you can’t have any alcohol in your system while in possession of a loaded firearm.

    Trying to actually conceal a 45 is problematic. I don’t normally wear a suit coat or jacket at work, so conceal carrying it under my shirt was pointless; it was not concealed.

    Fully loaded the PT-11 weighs 4 pounds. Having that hang off my belt was unbelievably uncomfortable after only a few days. It has front sights, rear sights, corners, edges, and a safety and hammer, which snagged on everything. My habits had to change, so I did not use my hip to hold open a door while my hands were full. Sitting in my vehicle was uncomfortable due to the extra space the firearm takes up.

    I settled on putting my firearm in my GHB and leaving it in my vehicle. Most of the time I am in a facility that does not allow it anyway, but I can still get to a firearm within a few minutes. It won’t help in a quick draw situation, but it is what it is.
    factory specs say that the PT11 weighs 22 ozs. 4 lbs is 64 ozs. So you're claiming the gun holds 42 ozs of ammo? if so, you're full of it. As a skinny 17 year old kid, i used to conceal a 7.5" barreled .44 Navy cap and ball. I wore it Calvarly draw position, behind my hip, under a hung out shirt. on a motorcycle, even. I am 6 ft tall, and can sit down just fine with a 1911 worn at the navel. It' can be fast drawn just fine, too. It's just a question of rotating it enough to put the muzzle into the crease between your thigh and pelvis.

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  • Applejack
    replied
    Originally posted by CountryGuy View Post
    AJ, you might also consider taking your LCP and other guns you have trouble pulling the trigger on to a gunsmith and ask them about doing a trigger job and lightening the pull weight. Don't get it to light as it can become a "hair trigger" but lightening them some might give you relief.

    Making the slide easier to pull back and cycle is a different story. In that case the best option might be a small compact revolver like say a Ruger LCR or Lady Smith in .38 Special which is quite similar to your .380 LCP. Just food for thought.
    Never thought about taking my Ruger to a gun smith. I had a neighbor that was transfered as he was going to see if he could fit my gun with some grips to see if that would make the slide easier. I could ask a gun smith about that as well.

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  • CountryGuy
    replied
    AJ, you might also consider taking your LCP and other guns you have trouble pulling the trigger on to a gunsmith and ask them about doing a trigger job and lightening the pull weight. Don't get it to light as it can become a "hair trigger" but lightening them some might give you relief.

    Making the slide easier to pull back and cycle is a different story. In that case the best option might be a small compact revolver like say a Ruger LCR or Lady Smith in .38 Special which is quite similar to your .380 LCP. Just food for thought.

    Leave a comment:


  • Applejack
    replied
    Country there is no problem with the recoil. It is my hand and fingers are not strong enough to pull back on the lever nor push the trigger back without pain in my index finger. This one was no problem. And yes I did get a great price on it. I have used my husband's 45 many times but the trigger is the problem now. This one though it is a 380 is great for concealed carry. I will be doing some target practice with it next week. And I am going to take the 22 with me as well to see how I do with that also. I really hope I can still shoot with the 22 but haven't tried yet.

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  • CountryGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by Applejack View Post
    I just bought a new Smith & Wesson M & P shield EZ 380 semi auto. It is made for people with arthritic hands. I could pull the lever back as well as squeeze the trigger with no problem. I tried out the judge but can no longer pull the trigger on that without great pain in my index finger. I got this one at the pawn shop by us. I go in there looking around a lot and sometimes find great buys. Last buy was a couple brand new gas cans. Couldn't beat that price on them of 5.00. They were higher than that at walmart. I am going out next week to range for target practice with it next week. This gun had very good reviews. It will now replace my Ruger 380 for my concealed carry.
    Congrats on the find AJ, hope you got a smoking deal on it!!

    With your arthritis, if you find and that the .380 recoil is getting to you, and it might not make sense, but you might be better off going to a 9mm. With just a slightly slightly larger gun and with the way the cartridge reacts, the perceptible recoil is often much less on a 9 than a .380. this also typically allows for faster follow up shots due to less muzzle flip.

    Sadly it seems that if a lady walks into most gun shops looking for a small concealed pistiol, most shops throw and Micro .380 at them. Then when they go shoot them they don't like the recoil as often the gun is even to small to fit their hands and prevents a good hold, the recoil can be a bit snappy and off putting for a new shooter and then they end up not practicing and worse, not carrying it. Just food for thought in case recoil was also part of the issue with your LCP, hopefully your M&P will be just what you need.

    I've recently been looking at picking up an LCP as a pocket gun and deep conceal to allow me to have something small enough to carry places that may wish that I don't... hypothetically speaking that is...I wouldn't advocate to violate any laws or say company policy as I'm sure they're all capable of protecting me on a moments notice in the event of say workplace violence. With the prices on some LCP models at like $190 it's sort of hard to pass up. I used to be of the "if it isn't a .45" crowd... but something is better than nothing and to be honest, I know I wouldn't want to get shot period and I sure wouldn't want hit with a .380, especially if it's by a person that knows how to shoot and knows about shot placement.

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  • Applejack
    replied
    I just bought a new Smith & Wesson M & P shield EZ 380 semi auto. It is made for people with arthritic hands. I could pull the lever back as well as squeeze the trigger with no problem. I tried out the judge but can no longer pull the trigger on that without great pain in my index finger. I got this one at the pawn shop by us. I go in there looking around a lot and sometimes find great buys. Last buy was a couple brand new gas cans. Couldn't beat that price on them of 5.00. They were higher than that at walmart. I am going out next week to range for target practice with it next week. This gun had very good reviews. It will now replace my Ruger 380 for my concealed carry.

    Leave a comment:


  • SonofLiberty
    replied
    If I could find one and could afford it, I would carry an old Detonics 45
    https://www.sightm1911.com/lib/history/detonics.htm
    I currently carry a SCCY 9mm.
    https://www.sccy.com/product/cpx-2-tt-9mm/

    Leave a comment:


  • Applejack
    replied
    As some of you know, I have arthritis in my hands to the point of possible knuckle surgery which is not going to happen. I have a Ruger 380 semi auto that I cannot even use due to weak hands and fingers. So today though I was not looking for a gun, went into my local pawn shop. They had a big sale going on so I decided to look around. I have bought things from them before. Got 2 gas cans for cheap that were brand new at $1.00 each a while back. So I decided to talk to a couple of the guys about guns and my hand problem. Two or three years ago I was doing target practice with my neighbor's the judge as you call it. Today I tried one out and can't even push back on the trigger. So the guy had me try a Smith and Wesson M&P sheild EZ 380 semi auto. I could pull it back and pull the trigger with no problem. I checked the reviews and they were great. So I tried it out and loved it. So yes I bought it. I now have a gun that my hands can handle without pain. I will now be back carrying a concealed gun again.

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  • Sierra 173
    replied
    Over the years I've carried all sorts and caliber of pistols. In the end, I've come to the conclusion that accuracy is the most important thing to have on your side when launching a bullet. The next thing you want on your side is a decent weight/diameter bullet. The 9 mm bullet lets me have everything that I need to get the job done. For me the Glock 19 gives me 15 rounds of 9 mm diplomacy to immediately put into service should the need arise and it delivers those rounds with dependability and accuracy.

    Here's a photo of my primary carry pistol, a grey Glock 19. This pistol is small enough to carry concealed and I use it for such about 90% of the time when I leave home. I have other pistols that use on other occasions but a good Glock 19, with a Glock 17 magazine for an emergency reload, is really a hard combination to beat.

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  • Sierra 173
    replied
    My concealed pistols depend on where I am headed and what I will be doing. They also are determined by the clothes that I wear too. About 90% of the time I carry a Glock 19 for my CCW. Other times, when I am looking for flat and thin guns, I carry a Springfield Armory XD-S in 9 mm or a Smith and Wesson 9 mm Shield.

    I have practiced with all 3 pistols and feel comfortable carrying any of them with one or two spare magazines. When I wear more casual clothes like sweatshirts with the tails out I carry the G-19. The G-19 gives me at least 15 rounds of 9 mm diplomacy if I should ever need it. For a compact handgun that G-19 is pretty darned accurate too from about 25 yards right on down to zero yards.

    My XD-S is the more accurate of the three pistols. I love to shoot that little jewel. I don't know what SA did but my XD-S is so accurate that a buddy of mine decided to get a SA pistol of his own and loves his too. Normally Charlie can't hit a silhouette target very well from 25 yards. In fact, he's lucky to put 1 or maybe 2 bullets on a silhouette if he's lucky. With his SA pistol or mine he plugs all 6 of his required shots right into the center mass. Not just on the target but in the center mass area of the target.

    Any way, that's how I roll with my pistols.

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  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by dalewick View Post
    I've finally changed up after years of carrying a Glock 19. I now am carrying a Glock 43 as I'm not needing as many rounds on my side since I'm retired and the lighter weight and smaller size work better for me now. I carry 1 extra mag for a total of 12 rounds but still practice 2 quick rounds to the heart/chest area and 1 to the head then on to the next target. If I am so unfortunate as to be in a target rich environment that there are that many bad guys around, I will be picking up a rifle from one on the ground.

    Dale
    I forgot to mention in my last post that my change was more than just swapping my G19 for a G43. I now carry a second "pistol" in my vehicle bag or anytime I feel that I need more than my side arm. I had my criteria for years but until SB Tactical arm braces came about I wasn't willing to deal with the legal headaches of a SBR. Now I have a civilian version of the MK18 and it works very well for me, especially with 77gr ammo. So well out to 300 yards that I use it as my predator hunting gun, I'm satisfied with it.

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  • CountryGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by RICHFL View Post
    What you need to do is misdirect the eyes to an area of the body away from the weapon.

    My EDC is a belly pack I wear most places, inside I can carry 2/4 magazines, and my weapon on my hip.
    To me those 2 statements contradict. If I see someone with a fanny pack in a forward or hip position I automatically assume they are packing. My eye is drawn to it. So to me a fanny/ belly pack is a huge flag. I know you said you're hip carrying and the pack is for your mags but now days a fanny pack is so out of style it becomes a neon sign.

    As big of a flag as a fanny pack is one of those camera/ fishing style vests guys like to wear as a cover. A friend of mine wears one all the time and I tell him i think it's a huge tell. Though I do admit I like the look. But how often do you see guys wearing those at the gun shop, range or gun show...

    Just my thoughts and observations...

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